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Akiva Goldsman

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Akiva Goldsman arrived at the door of producer Brian Grazer in 1998 with one purpose. "I went there," the screenwriter says, "to beg." Goldsman, who had enjoyed a steady ascension in Hollywood for years, was coming off a string of films that had badly battered his reputation. He had produced and written the forgettable dud "Lost in Space" -- and far worse, he had written the screenplay that would become the 1997 bomb "Batman & Robin," one of the most savagely disliked movies of the decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By John Horn
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, who died Sunday at age 76, represented one of the most famous miscarriages of justice in recent American history: He served 19 years in prison for three murders before his convictions were set aside. But the former middleweight boxer also figured prominently in a Hollywood drama, this one focused on how negative publicity can destroy an Academy Awards campaign and how studios in the years that followed mastered the art of heading off Oscar criticism before it was too late.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Winter's Tale" is so obviously a passion project, so much a labor of love for industry veteran Akiva Goldsman, that you'd like to be able to say it's a complete success. It isn't, but the parts that do succeed, especially the fervor between stars Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay, provide such lush, emotional magic that unabashed romantics will be pleased. Co-produced, written and directed by Goldsman, "Winter's Tale" has been drastically pared from Mark Helprin's nearly 700-page 1983 literary blockbuster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | Charles Taylor, Special to The Times
"The Da Vinci Code" is not just a mega-selling book, not just a crowd-drawing movie, it's also, at $21.95, an "illustrated screenplay" replete with storyboards, stills from the movie, musings by author Dan Brown and the movie's principals and boxes of production trivia (such as " 'The Da Vinci Code' had 25 revisions over six months" and "Twenty-four rue Haxo doesn't actually exist in Paris.") At the heart of the "official making-of-the-movie book," though, is Akiva Goldsman's script.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Winter's Tale" is so obviously a passion project, so much a labor of love for industry veteran Akiva Goldsman, that you'd like to be able to say it's a complete success. It isn't, but the parts that do succeed, especially the fervor between stars Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay, provide such lush, emotional magic that unabashed romantics will be pleased. Co-produced, written and directed by Goldsman, "Winter's Tale" has been drastically pared from Mark Helprin's nearly 700-page 1983 literary blockbuster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
OSCAR-winning screenwriter Akiva Goldsman was "startled" when he heard that Vatican cardinals were condemning his next picture, the hotly anticipated film version of "The Da Vinci Code." "Then I was concerned," he muses, "and then I realized that the Vatican doesn't like condoms either, and a lot of people buy those." If the 43-year-old scribe sounds insouciant, he has reason to be. At least 50 million people have read the novel, and awareness of the Ron Howard film, opening in the U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a balmy Tuesday night in West Hollywood. And no one's enjoying it more than the mid-size guy who's ambling up Sunset in navy T-shirt and chino pants, hands in pockets, looking like he might be mentally whistling a happy tune. Akiva Goldsman, Oscar-nominated author of the screenplay for "A Beautiful Mind," is about to realize a dream. As a child in Brooklyn, Goldsman never hankered for Academy Awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2002 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"A Beautiful Mind" is often described as a film about Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Forbes Nash's harrowing journey into schizophrenia. But the film, which earned eight Oscar nominations Tuesday, is also the culmination of an intensely personal journey for screenwriter Akiva Goldsman, whose script was nominated for best screenplay adaptation. "I've probably been writing this story my whole life," says Goldsman, 39, whose parents founded one of the first group homes for childhood schizophrenia in the late 1950s in Brooklyn Heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By John Horn
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, who died Sunday at age 76, represented one of the most famous miscarriages of justice in recent American history: He served 19 years in prison for three murders before his convictions were set aside. But the former middleweight boxer also figured prominently in a Hollywood drama, this one focused on how negative publicity can destroy an Academy Awards campaign and how studios in the years that followed mastered the art of heading off Oscar criticism before it was too late.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Akiva Goldsman arrived at the door of producer Brian Grazer in 1998 with one purpose. "I went there," the screenwriter says, "to beg." Goldsman, who had enjoyed a steady ascension in Hollywood for years, was coming off a string of films that had badly battered his reputation. He had produced and written the forgettable dud "Lost in Space" -- and far worse, he had written the screenplay that would become the 1997 bomb "Batman & Robin," one of the most savagely disliked movies of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | Charles Taylor, Special to The Times
"The Da Vinci Code" is not just a mega-selling book, not just a crowd-drawing movie, it's also, at $21.95, an "illustrated screenplay" replete with storyboards, stills from the movie, musings by author Dan Brown and the movie's principals and boxes of production trivia (such as " 'The Da Vinci Code' had 25 revisions over six months" and "Twenty-four rue Haxo doesn't actually exist in Paris.") At the heart of the "official making-of-the-movie book," though, is Akiva Goldsman's script.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
OSCAR-winning screenwriter Akiva Goldsman was "startled" when he heard that Vatican cardinals were condemning his next picture, the hotly anticipated film version of "The Da Vinci Code." "Then I was concerned," he muses, "and then I realized that the Vatican doesn't like condoms either, and a lot of people buy those." If the 43-year-old scribe sounds insouciant, he has reason to be. At least 50 million people have read the novel, and awareness of the Ron Howard film, opening in the U.S.
BOOKS
March 24, 2002 | DAVID FREEMAN, David Freeman is a screenwriter and the author of "A Hollywood Education," "One of Us" and other books.
In Los Angeles, script reading can be a badge of honor, a sign of position. "Don't bother Mommy now, she's reading scripts." The little tyke is expected to back off, knowing there's no appeal. Mommy's mired in her "weekend read," plowing through scripts of unproduced movies. It means Mommy's important. Now another kind of script is gaining a new popularity: the published versions of movies already made and in some cases even playing at the multiplex.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a balmy Tuesday night in West Hollywood. And no one's enjoying it more than the mid-size guy who's ambling up Sunset in navy T-shirt and chino pants, hands in pockets, looking like he might be mentally whistling a happy tune. Akiva Goldsman, Oscar-nominated author of the screenplay for "A Beautiful Mind," is about to realize a dream. As a child in Brooklyn, Goldsman never hankered for Academy Awards.
BOOKS
March 24, 2002 | DAVID FREEMAN, David Freeman is a screenwriter and the author of "A Hollywood Education," "One of Us" and other books.
In Los Angeles, script reading can be a badge of honor, a sign of position. "Don't bother Mommy now, she's reading scripts." The little tyke is expected to back off, knowing there's no appeal. Mommy's mired in her "weekend read," plowing through scripts of unproduced movies. It means Mommy's important. Now another kind of script is gaining a new popularity: the published versions of movies already made and in some cases even playing at the multiplex.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009
Great article about Akiva Goldsman ["For Akiva Goldsman, a Beautiful Turnaround," Oct. 18]. It's nice to see a fair and balanced perspective on the failures and successes of writers-directors as they pursue their craft in Hollywood. Chandus Jackson Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2002 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"A Beautiful Mind" is often described as a film about Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Forbes Nash's harrowing journey into schizophrenia. But the film, which earned eight Oscar nominations Tuesday, is also the culmination of an intensely personal journey for screenwriter Akiva Goldsman, whose script was nominated for best screenplay adaptation. "I've probably been writing this story my whole life," says Goldsman, 39, whose parents founded one of the first group homes for childhood schizophrenia in the late 1950s in Brooklyn Heights.
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