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Al Davis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Al Davis is like a bad drug habit. First he wants $30 million to keep the Raiders in Los Angeles. Now he wants us to destroy our nice old Colisuem. Tomorrow maybe he'll want $50 million and our firstborn. I say let him walk. JOSHUA ALPER Los Angeles
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SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Oakland Raiders Chief Executive Amy Trask, who joined the Raiders in 1987 and became CEO in 1997, resigned from the team on Saturday. "Earlier today, I informed Mark Davis of my decision to leave the Raiders," she said in a  statement. "Having honored a commitment that I made to effectuate a smooth transition and transfer of control, I no longer wish to remain with the organization. For over a quarter of a century, it was my honor and my privilege to work for the Raiders. I will forever appreciate the opportunity afforded me by Al Davis.
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SPORTS
December 15, 1991 | By Mark Heisler, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
An hour before the game, Al Davis stands at the 50-yard line of the silent Coliseum, surveying the field through his sunglasses darkly, as if the world's fate were to be decided upon it. His bodyguards, two off-duty Los Angeles policemen dressed like assistant coaches, watch from a discreet distance. A small retinue of close friends from Oakland, who fly down faithfully for games, walks up to shake hands. Sometimes, Sam Bercovich, a kindly, spindly 73-year-old retired furniture dealer, actually runs onto the field for warmups with the defensive backs, a commitment to excellence in the geriatric extreme.
SPORTS
April 23, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Thirty years ago this week, the NFL teetered on wobbly legs. It was coming off the 1982 player strike, Raiders owner Al Davis had just successfully sued the league for the right to move his team to Los Angeles, the USFL was poaching players -- including Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker -- and John Elway, who would be selected No. 1 overall in the draft, was threatening to play for the New York Yankees if the Baltimore Colts used the first pick...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2011 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
Al Davis, the tough-minded owner of the Oakland Raiders who transformed a failing team into a three-time Super Bowl champion and one of the most successful franchises in professional football only to preside over its dramatic decline in recent years, died Saturday. He was 82. On their website, the Raiders confirmed the death of Davis, whose "Just win, baby!" motto underscored his desire to emerge victorious in every battle, whether it was on the field or in the courtroom. He had been ailing in recent years and did not travel to a Raiders game in Buffalo last month, only the second game he had missed since the team returned to Oakland in 1995.
SPORTS
October 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Al Davis was an early bloomer and a late riser. The NFL icon, who became the Oakland Raiders' head coach at 33, was known for keeping very late hours and making middle-of-the-night phone calls to football confidants and team employees. Agent Leigh Steinberg remembers getting those calls. "If my home phone would ring after midnight, I knew it would be Al," Steinberg said Saturday, hours after learning that Davis, 82, had died. "He would ask questions about every player I represented, every other team in the league, every college player I knew anything about.
SPORTS
July 5, 2003
So Al Davis is now suing the city of Oakland for $1 billion. This is the same Al Davis who let Jon Gruden leave for Tampa Bay after the 2001 season and saw Gruden's current team embarrass Davis' Raiders in the Super Bowl this year. I will say there is one thing that Al Davis did that turned out to be great for die-hard Denver Bronco fans like myself. If he hadn't fired Mike Shanahan as the Raider coach during the 1988 season, there's a very good chance that the Broncos may never have won the two Super Bowls that Shanahan's leadership helped us win. Michael Lipofsky Simi Valley
SPORTS
February 3, 1995
When Al Davis lets it fly, he really lets it fly. Morning Briefing moves aside like a San Diego safety today to make room for the Raider owner taking off on a variety of subjects Thursday. Coach-in-a-box: The 1988 hiring of Mike Shanahan, now coaching at Denver, was probably not his greatest decision, Davis admitted. "When he was here, he was just overwhelmed. "He's grown up now. He was so insecure when he was here (addressing the team), he made them put a box here so he'd seem taller."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990
Well, the other kids wouldn't play by his rules, so Al Davis picked up his ball and went home--though in typical Davis fashion he went not so much out of pique as for a price. Los Angeles may be without a professional football team for the second time in 10 years, but there is no reason for city officials or the Coliseum commissioners to be particularly downcast.
SPORTS
October 5, 2008 | Dave Goldberg, Associated Press
Two decades ago, Al Davis and Bill Parcells were chatting during an NFL owners meeting when Davis' new coach strolled by. "I want you to meet Mike Shanahan," Davis told Parcells. "He's going to be a great head coach." Shanahan, 35 at the time, has indeed distinguished himself, but not with Davis' Raiders. Twenty games into his tenure, he was fired, the same point that Davis fired Lane Kiffin this week. So what happened to Kiffin isn't new. But it's sad. Because given recent history, it's easy to overlook the many contributions Al Davis has made to the NFL. They include moves that led to the AFL-NFL merger, making the league into the multibillion dollar corporation it is today.
SPORTS
November 5, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
ALAMEDA. - Equipment manager Bob Romanski has been working for the Oakland Raiders longer than head Coach Dennis Allen or any of his players have been alive. Yet that's only good for second place on the family list when it comes to service time with the team. Romanski's father, Dick, 84, who still reports to work as something of an equipment manager emeritus, joined the team a half-century ago at the invitation of an old Army buddy named Al Davis. And although the feisty, combative Davis went on to become the man behind the Raiders and their outlaw image, Dick Romanski might actually have been the face of the franchise.
SPORTS
July 30, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
NAPA, Calif. -- The Oakland Raiders know their past, are surrounded by reminders of their past, and pay homage to their past. But they're no longer stuck in their past. That's the early indication, anyway, as the Raiders begin their next chapter with new owner Mark Davis - son of the late Al Davis - first-year Coach Dennis Allen, and top football executive Reggie McKenzie, the club's first general manager since the elder Davis began running the entire operation in 1963. Al Davis died in October, and control of the franchise was passed to his son. Even the team's 2012 media guide, finally printed in color, reflects the change, bearing the slogan "A New Era of Excellence" on the cover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
George Anderson, the longtime athletic trainer for the Oakland and Los Angeles Raiders who devised an innovative knee brace that became standard for football players, died Thursday in Santa Fe, N.M., his daughter Kristi Anderson Ornstein said. He was 82 and had Parkinson's disease and diabetes. FOR THE RECORD: George Anderson: The obituary of former Raiders athletic trainer George Anderson in the April 1 California section gave his age as 82. Anderson was born Jan. 23, 1929, and was 83 when he died March 29. The obituary also omitted his wife, Gailey Vollmer, from the list of survivors.
SPORTS
January 10, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
The Raiders have long been considered a candidate to relocate back to Los Angeles, and Tuesday new owner Mark Davis officially put them in play. Davis, son of late owner Al Davis, said it's essential that the Raiders get a new stadium and that the organization has had conversations with L.A. stadium groups. "The timetable is yesterday. So that's where it is. We've got to get a stadium. We've got to get that done," Davis said Tuesday at a news conference to introduce Reggie McKenzie as Raiders general manager.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Reporting from Alameda — Almost three decades before becoming coach of the Raiders, Hue Jackson turned his back on NFL football. And he was paid to do so. Jackson, a tough but levelheaded kid from South Los Angeles, was one of those yellow-jacketed security guards at L.A. Raiders games in the 1980s. His job was to stand at field level at the Coliseum, facing away from the game, and scan the stands for unruly fans. There were plenty of those, although he concedes he was a bit halfhearted in carrying out his assignment.
SPORTS
October 27, 2011 | Sam Farmer
Reporting from Alameda, Calif. — It's obviously an off week for the Oakland Raiders because Coach Hue Jackson was wearing a maroon sweat suit Thursday when meeting up with a reporter at team headquarters. That's not standard attire in the land of Silver & Black. "Sorry about the outfit," Jackson said. "Just grabbed the first thing out of my closet. " The colors aren't changing, but the Raiders undeniably are a franchise in flux. They have a new owner — the late Al Davis has been replaced by his son, Mark — a first-year coach, and a just-acquired quarterback in Carson Palmer.
SPORTS
October 9, 2011 | Sam Farmer
Westward whoa! The four teams from the left-hand coast found themselves in the left-hand column Sunday, as Oakland, San Francisco, San Diego and Seattle put up big victories in locales all over the NFL map. The Raiders, a day after the death of owner Al Davis, beat the first-place Texans in Houston, 25-20, and now have a winning record. Oakland hasn't been above .500 this late in the season since 2002. In a battle of 3-1 teams, the 49ers crushed Tampa Bay, 48-3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2011 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
Al Davis, the tough-minded owner of the Oakland Raiders who transformed a failing team into a three-time Super Bowl champion and one of the most successful franchises in professional football only to preside over its dramatic decline in recent years, died Saturday. He was 82. On their website, the Raiders confirmed the death of Davis, whose "Just win, baby!" motto underscored his desire to emerge victorious in every battle, whether it was on the field or in the courtroom. He had been ailing in recent years and did not travel to a Raiders game in Buffalo last month, only the second game he had missed since the team returned to Oakland in 1995.
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