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March 17, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Guitarist Al Di Meola was a charter member of one of the authentic jazz super-groups of the '70s, Return to Forever. Along with pianist Chick Corea, bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Lennie White, Di Meola--who will play at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight--charted a course for jazz that virtually defined the word fusion. After RTF broke up in 1976, Di Meola went on to sell millions of albums as a soloist with several acoustic and electric groups of his own.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Chick Corea is smiling. In fact, he's beaming. Seated behind his Minimoog and his Fender Rhodes keyboards, arms and hands in motion, kicking out one brisk rhythmic phrase after another, making constant eye contact with the musicians around him -- guitarist Al Di Meola, bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Lenny White -- he's obviously feeling great. Wait a minute: Corea, Di Meola, Clarke and White?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are three types of Al Di Meola fans: those who favor his electric groups, those who prefer his acoustic guitar stylings and those who can't get enough of both. Two of those factions were rewarded this year when Di Meola released an acoustic recording, "World Sinfonia," his first album of any sort in almost four years. Fans in the remaining camp shouldn't be downhearted, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is the Times' jazz writer
List the names of Joe Pass, George Benson, Al Di Meola and Pat Metheny and you've got a pretty good representation of the jazz guitar styles of the post-bebop era. Pass' playing, of course, has deep roots in acoustically oriented straight-ahead jazz; Benson added blues and soul; Di Meola opened windows to fusion and world music; and Metheny has roved freely through all of the above--and then some.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Al Di Meola doesn't like to be pigeonholed. Known early in his career for the burning electric riffs he fired up for Chick Corea's Return to Forever band, the Jersey City native has found, to his frustration, that many of his fans, as well as record companies, expect the same kind of play from him year after year. Di Meola, who plays tonight at Orange Coast College's Robert B. Moore Theatre, has always resisted that kind of categorization.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you're as good a guitarist as Al Di Meola, it's hard to avoid using fast fingers as a musical weapon. And Di Meola has sometimes been guilty of precisely that, relying heavily upon his astonishing virtuosity rather than the richness of his musical imagination. But in his late set at Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday, in the opening of a six-night run, Di Meola managed to use virtually all of his creative skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is the Times' jazz writer
List the names of Joe Pass, George Benson, Al Di Meola and Pat Metheny and you've got a pretty good representation of the jazz guitar styles of the post-bebop era. Pass' playing, of course, has deep roots in acoustically oriented straight-ahead jazz; Benson added blues and soul; Di Meola opened windows to fusion and world music; and Metheny has roved freely through all of the above--and then some.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
At 33, guitarist Al DiMeola, the man who built his reputation with one finger-flying solo after another in Return to Forever and his own band, is slowing down. "Endless blistering fast lines do not impress me anymore," DiMeola said recently. His three Manhattan Records LPs--"Cielo e Terra," "Soaring Through a Dream" and the just-released "Tirami Su"--back up his statement: each has a degree of quietude and lyricism not previously found in DiMeola's live or recorded performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Al Di Meola's quest for the right band finally seems to have hit pay dirt. His current ensemble, which performed at the Strand in Redondo Beach on Sunday night, is a state-of-the-art collection of contemporary musicians who enhance his playing and challenge him to stretch his abilities, both as a guitarist and a composer. The net result was an exciting evening of music. Di Meola's improvising was so explosive that it sometimes seemed on the verge of bursting past the strings of his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
Fourteen years after the breakup of Return to Forever, guitarist Al DiMeola still misses being a member of the seminal electric jazz band led by Chick Corea. DiMeola, in fact, still harbors hopes of a reunion with former band mates Corea, the piano and keyboard player, drummer Lenny White and bassist Stanley Clarke. "It was the most ridiculous thing for Chick to ever break up the group," said DiMeola, who plays the Bacchanal at 8:30 Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you're as good a guitarist as Al Di Meola, it's hard to avoid using fast fingers as a musical weapon. And Di Meola has sometimes been guilty of precisely that, relying heavily upon his astonishing virtuosity rather than the richness of his musical imagination. But in his late set at Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday, in the opening of a six-night run, Di Meola managed to use virtually all of his creative skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guitarist Al Di Meola doesn't like to be pigeonholed. Known early in his career for the burning electric riffs he fired up for Chick Corea's Return to Forever band, the Jersey City native has found, to his frustration, that many of his fans, as well as record companies, expect the same kind of play from him year after year. Di Meola, who plays tonight at Orange Coast College's Robert B. Moore Theatre, has always resisted that kind of categorization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Al Di Meola's quest for the right band finally seems to have hit pay dirt. His current ensemble, which performed at the Strand in Redondo Beach on Sunday night, is a state-of-the-art collection of contemporary musicians who enhance his playing and challenge him to stretch his abilities, both as a guitarist and a composer. The net result was an exciting evening of music. Di Meola's improvising was so explosive that it sometimes seemed on the verge of bursting past the strings of his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, some musicians harbor dual identities, playing reserved acoustic sets one day and shrieking electric gigs the next. Since breaking into view back in the 1970s with Chick Corea's fusion project, Return To Forever, guitarist Al DiMeola has been known to exhibit both personalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are three types of Al Di Meola fans: those who favor his electric groups, those who prefer his acoustic guitar stylings and those who can't get enough of both. Two of those factions were rewarded this year when Di Meola released an acoustic recording, "World Sinfonia," his first album of any sort in almost four years. Fans in the remaining camp shouldn't be downhearted, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good thing guitarist Al di Meola didn't listen to recording industry execs who took a pass on his newest recording. Rejected by several labels, Di Meola produced "World Sinfonia" himself and landed his own distribution deal. The release, his first in four years, is quite possibly the finest among his 13 as a leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, some musicians harbor dual identities, playing reserved acoustic sets one day and shrieking electric gigs the next. Since breaking into view back in the 1970s with Chick Corea's fusion project, Return To Forever, guitarist Al DiMeola has been known to exhibit both personalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Good thing guitarist Al di Meola didn't listen to recording industry execs who took a pass on his newest recording. Rejected by several labels, Di Meola produced "World Sinfonia" himself and landed his own distribution deal. The release, his first in four years, is quite possibly the finest among his 13 as a leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
Fourteen years after the breakup of Return to Forever, guitarist Al DiMeola still misses being a member of the seminal electric jazz band led by Chick Corea. DiMeola, in fact, still harbors hopes of a reunion with former band mates Corea, the piano and keyboard player, drummer Lenny White and bassist Stanley Clarke. "It was the most ridiculous thing for Chick to ever break up the group," said DiMeola, who plays the Bacchanal at 8:30 Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Guitarist Al Di Meola was a charter member of one of the authentic jazz super-groups of the '70s, Return to Forever. Along with pianist Chick Corea, bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Lennie White, Di Meola--who will play at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight--charted a course for jazz that virtually defined the word fusion. After RTF broke up in 1976, Di Meola went on to sell millions of albums as a soloist with several acoustic and electric groups of his own.
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