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November 20, 1999 | Edmund Sanders
Al Frank, one of the nation's top-ranked investment newsletter writers, has sold a 70% stake in his Laguna Beach-based company, Al Frank Asset Management Inc., to a group of Minneapolis investors. Frank, 69, will continue to write the newsletter, the Prudent Speculator, and help run the company's small-cap mutual fund and its private investment accounts, which manage about $60 million.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | Edmund Sanders
Al Frank, one of the nation's top-ranked investment newsletter writers, has sold a 70% stake in his Laguna Beach-based company, Al Frank Asset Management Inc., to a group of Minneapolis investors. Frank, 69, will continue to write the newsletter, the Prudent Speculator, and help run the company's small-cap mutual fund and its private investment accounts, which manage about $60 million.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Frank, one of the nation's top-ranked investment newsletter writers, said Friday that he has sold a 70% stake in his Laguna Beach-based company to a group of Minneapolis investors. Frank, 69, will continue to write the newsletter, the Prudent Speculator, and help run the company's small-cap mutual fund and its private investment accounts, which manage about $60 million.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two California companies that make systems to detect weapons saw their shares surge Monday after the arrest of a passenger who allegedly tried to blow up a plane on a transatlantic flight Saturday. InVision Technologies Inc., based in Newark, Calif., makes machines that scan baggage for the presence of explosives. Its shares rose $4.20, or 15%, to $32.71 on Nasdaq as investors bet sales will increase. The stock has soared tenfold since Sept. 11. OSI Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
The next big stock tip might be as close as a Twitter feed. Professional traders are developing computer programs that scour Internet posts in search of the next stock market darling. Their technology analyzes everything uttered about a company - good or bad, racy or mundane - and spits out trading recommendations. The logic is that the popular sentiment expressed by millions of people on sites such as Twitter and Facebook yields investment clues that can't be gleaned from financial statements or analyst reports.
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