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Al Gore

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1997 | ROBERT S. McELVAINE, Robert S. McElvaine teaches history at Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. He is currently completing a book entitled "Sex: Women, Men and History."
How can it be that Bill Clinton, who has been linked to more scandals than a dog has fleas, continues to sail along with second-term approval ratings that rival Eisenhower's and Reagan's, while poor Al Gore seems to be unraveling over a few phone calls for contributions that he made from the White House? To any reasonable observer, it is plain that the allegations against the vice president are inconsequential in comparison with those that have been made for years against the president.
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NEWS
July 9, 1999 | ROY RIVENBURG
Naked Truth Bureau: Now that the war in Kosovo is over, we're pretty sure the most dangerous job in journalism is covering Al Gore's presidential campaign. That's partly because his speeches are so powerfully dull that they have been used as a substitute for anesthesia in Third World hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1992
The force of change hit last night with the roar and rush of a sonic boom. Suddenly 12 years of Ronald Reagan and George Bush--with their shares of notable successes and notable failures--were history. Suddenly a new figure--relatively young, relatively unknown outside of Arkansas, but obviously intelligent, talented, shrewd and extremely determined--will become the new commander in chief, leader of the Western World and 42nd President of the United States. THE TRIUMPH: How Gov.
OPINION
October 11, 1992 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a national reporter for The Times
More than one person in the crowd asks why Al Gore, the apparently flawless candidate, isn't at the head of the ticket. The son of a famous senator, of the same name, from Tennessee, the younger Gore, at 44, has already served 13 circumspect years in the House and Senate. The ever-so-slight drawl may suggest backwoods Tennessee, but he spent his childhood living at the Fairfax Hotel only blocks from the White House.
OPINION
July 5, 2002 | CRISPIN SARTWELL, Crispin Sartwell teaches philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art. E-mail: mindstorm @pipeline.com.
"If I had it to do over again, I'd just let it rip," Gore told a private gathering of many of his most significant donors and fund-raisers, according to an aide who relayed the remarks to reporters. "To hell with the polls, tactics and all the rest. I would have poured out my heart and my vision for America's future." --Washington Post, June 30, 2002 * Pity Al Gore. Like the comic-book character Howard the Duck, he's "trapped in a world that he never made."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At last year's Environmental Media Awards ceremony, organizers handed out hundreds of hardback copies of then-Sen. Al Gore's hit book "Earth in the Balance." This year, they handed out Vice President Al Gore. Following Gore's sober keynote address to the star-studded crowd at Fox Studios Monday night, host Paula Poundstone playfully suggested that Gore might want to stick around and "work the crowd." But the crowd worked him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2006 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
Al Gore, leading man? To borrow a cliche from the Hollywood marketing playbook, the new global warming documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" stars the former vice president as you've never seen him before. Al Gore wheeling his own suitcase through airports, taking off his shoes and emptying his pockets at security. Al Gore firing up crowds with his one-man PowerPoint presentation show on arctic melt rates, devastating heat waves and dangerous changes in ocean currents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 40,000-member California Federation of Teachers endorsed gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Brown here Saturday as the parent American Federation of Teachers' 73rd convention got underway, with leaders introducing the issues that will occupy the union's delegates through Tuesday. "We know that Kathleen Brown cares deeply about kids--big kids and little kids--at all levels," said California Federation of Teachers President Mary Bergan, a vice president of the national organization.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Time: 5 p.m. EST. The Place: Cyberspace. The Scene: Nine hundred Compuserve subscribers, from Los Angeles to London, logged on by computer to an electronic conference room, awaiting the virtual presence of Vice President Al Gore, who is sitting at his own Compaq Pro Linea 4/33 in the White House. A sample of the on-screen dialogue: CAN ANYBODY SEE THIS? Is this gonna be on C-SPAN? it is how many are on? a jungle CAN ANYBODY TELL ME HOW TO SEE WHAT I'M SENDING?
NEWS
July 16, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Gore began developing his reputation as a stickler for detail as soon as he won his father's old seat in the House of Representatives. As a first-year congressman, he read all his office mail and then parceled out each letter for action. Over the years, that reputation has grown. When discussing a program involving hundreds of satellites, he wanted to know their colors--to ensure that their "reflective quotient" would not affect night light on Earth adversely.
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