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Al Green

ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1995 | Robert\f7 Hilburn
Just 39 minutes, but a gem from the greatest soul singer of his generation. This 1977 album was significant in two ways: Not only did Green take over the production chores from longtime cohort Willie Mitchell, he also made his formal move from secular to spiritual music. The key line in the song "Belle" was directed at a woman, but it could just as easily have been aimed at his old pop fans: "Belle, the Lord and I have been friends for a mighty long time. . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There aren't many singers who could get away with the performance Al Green gave in his early show at the Coach House Saturday night. It's not just that he only appeared for 55 minutes--he's been known to perform for as little as 35. But, evidently favoring a worn throat, he spent nearly half his time onstage mugging, featuring band solos and exhorting the audience to sing--in short, doing everything but sing himself. On top of that, the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1985 | RICHARD CROMELIN
In a transfixing performance Saturday at the Beverly Theatre, sexy-soul-singer-turned-sexy-minister Al Green soliloquized on sin and salvation, temperance, temptation and Tina Turner, God and the Grammys. He handed out roses and decried the rock 'n' roll he used to sing, then teased the crowd with lines from the old hits. Backed by a five-piece band and female vocal trio, Green twitched and undulated and slipped seamlessly from song to sermon and back again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1995 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Al Green isn't just the greatest soul singer of his generation--he's among the great est ever. Before becoming a minister and switching to gospel music in the late '70s, the Arkansas native mixed the passion of gospel music and the seductiveness of R&B in such classic Top 10 hits as "Tired of Being Alone." On Tuesday, MCA Records releases "Your Heart's in Good Hands," Green's first U.S. secular album in almost 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Al Green, arguably the ranking soul singer of the last 20 years, left the pop world to devote himself to gospel music a decade ago, but he still commands a room like a mass media star. Arriving at A&M Records' Hollywood headquarters for an afternoon interview, he breezes into the publicity offices like a one-man party.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
With the death of Ray Charles, the mantle of greatest living soul singer falls to Al Green, who is saluted in "The Immortal Soul of Al Green." The dazzling package highlights Calendar's annual salute to some of the year's highest-profile boxed sets. Green's set heads a group of offerings rated "essential" because they belong in any comprehensive pop library. Prices are typical figures at various retail outlets.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES ORANGE COUNTY POP MUSIC CRITIC
The eternal skirmish between flesh and spirit has always been an animating force in soul music. More than a decade after renouncing the fleshpots of pop for the spiritual seeking of gospel music, Al Green is still apt to put a little tension into his shows by toying with the temptation of singing some of the romantic hits that made him the leading soul performer of the early to middle 1970s. When the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1998 | DAVE HOEKSTRA, Dave Hoekstra is a staff writer at the Chicago Sun-Times and a contributing music writer to Playboy magazine
The best way to tell when R. Kelly has a new album is to count the number of friends who come out to play basketball with the R&B superstar at a gym just five blocks from the United Center, home of Michael Jordan and the Bulls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Rev. Al Green takes the stage Sunday at the Long Beach Blues Festival, he'll be doing what he likes to do most: singing soulful love songs, with equal amounts of wailing and warmth. "It's all about sharing my gift with y'all . . . and spreading love," said Green, who was shooting a new episode of "Ally McBeal" at Fox Studios last week while on a break from his first road tour in a few years. "Not physical, but emotional and spiritual love.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN
It's easy to see why Memphis-based Hi Records isn't mentioned more prominently in discussions of the great indie labels of the '50s, '60s and '70s. For one thing, any label based in Memphis is bound to be overshadowed by the wonder of hometown rivals Sun Records and Stax Records. In addition, one of Hi's artists--Al Green--was such a remarkable success story in the '70s that many pop observers tended to think of the company as simply a one-artist label.
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