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Al Holbert

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SPORTS
April 27, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Al Holbert has been coming to Riverside International Raceway almost since it was built in the late '50s. He watched his father, Bob, win here. And he has been here every year since the International Motor Sports Assn. came to Riverside in 1975. He has won 47 Camel GT races, more than any IMSA driver in history. He has won at every IMSA track except Riverside. He finished second here in 1979, 1982, 1983 and 1984. He has often said that the one race he wanted most to win was at Riverside.
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SPORTS
October 6, 1988 | Shav Glick
Al Holbert's death in an airplane accident Friday night in Ohio could mark the beginning of the end for the Porsche involvement in Indy car racing. Porsche has 2 years remaining in a 3-year commitment with its sponsor, Quaker State oil, and team spokesmen insist that the contract will be honored. Toward that end, Teo Fabi will drive the Porsche-March in the final two races this season, Oct. 16 at Laguna Seca and Nov. 6 in Miami.
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SPORTS
October 2, 1988
Al Holbert, the dominant driver in International Motor Sports Assn. history, died Friday night when the twin-engine plane he was piloting crashed shortly after takeoff from Don Scott Field in Columbus, Ohio. Holbert, 41, of Doylestown, Pa., was pronounced dead at the scene. Witnesses said the airplane struggled to gain proper altitude, and Holbert apparently was attempting to return to the airport when he crashed. The plane crashed into a field and caught fire.
SPORTS
October 2, 1988
Al Holbert, the dominant driver in International Motor Sports Assn. history, died Friday night when the twin-engine plane he was piloting crashed shortly after takeoff from Don Scott Field in Columbus, Ohio. Holbert, 41, of Doylestown, Pa., was pronounced dead at the scene. Witnesses said the airplane struggled to gain proper altitude, and Holbert apparently was attempting to return to the airport when he crashed. The plane crashed into a field and caught fire.
SPORTS
April 11, 1988 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Better is half a loaf than no bread. --JOHN HEYWOOD Better, too, is half a Porsche than no race car. That apparently was the decision of Porsche officials after their new model chassis failed to measure up against Indy car competition, leading team manager Al Holbert to trot out a 1988 March chassis for Sunday's opening race at Phoenix--powered by a turbocharged 750-horsepower V-8 Porsche engine.
SPORTS
February 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The team of Al Holbert, Derek Bell and Al Unser Jr., driving a Porsche 962 Prototype, erased deficits of up to 35 laps on the way to victory Sunday in the Sunbank Daytona 24-Hours sports car endurance race. "Lord, am I surprised," said Holbert, who finally added America's most prestigious endurance event to his long list of victories, including the 24 Hours of LeMans. "We were so far out of it," he added. "But we had perseverance and the other guys had their troubles and we just kept after it.
SPORTS
April 29, 1985 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Another race at Riverside International Raceway, another bitter disappointment for Al Holbert. During the short walk from his pit at the entrance to pit road to the trailer that will carry his turbo-charged Porsche 962 to the next race, Holbert was in no mood for being philosophical about jinxes or other such nonsense. It is altogether possible that, with the track on the verge of extinction, Holbert will never win an International Motor Sports Assn. race at Riverside.
SPORTS
January 4, 1986 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Race drivers can usually trace their roots to one of three sources: --They had a love affair with cars when they were teen-agers, working on them around the clock and racing them anywhere they could find a challenge, the way A. J. Foyt, Bobby Unser and Bill Elliott grew up. --They had wealth and saw racing expensive cars as an exciting diversion that turned into a full-time avocation, as happened with the Whittington brothers, Bill and Don; Josele Garza; Salt Walther, and the late Peter Revson.
SPORTS
October 6, 1988 | Shav Glick
Al Holbert's death in an airplane accident Friday night in Ohio could mark the beginning of the end for the Porsche involvement in Indy car racing. Porsche has 2 years remaining in a 3-year commitment with its sponsor, Quaker State oil, and team spokesmen insist that the contract will be honored. Toward that end, Teo Fabi will drive the Porsche-March in the final two races this season, Oct. 16 at Laguna Seca and Nov. 6 in Miami.
SPORTS
December 2, 1985
Al Holbert and Al Unser Jr. combined Sunday to win the season-ending Eastern 3-Hour International Motor Sports Assn. Camel GT sports car race at Daytona Beach, Fla. To take his ninth victory of the season, Holbert, driving a Porsche 962 prototype, had to battle Hurley Haywood, piloting a Jaguar XJR-5 prototype, throughout most of the final hour at Daytona International Speedway. However, with both cars reportedly low on fuel, Haywood slowed a bit in the final 10 minutes and Holbert won by 8.
SPORTS
April 11, 1988 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Better is half a loaf than no bread. --JOHN HEYWOOD Better, too, is half a Porsche than no race car. That apparently was the decision of Porsche officials after their new model chassis failed to measure up against Indy car competition, leading team manager Al Holbert to trot out a 1988 March chassis for Sunday's opening race at Phoenix--powered by a turbocharged 750-horsepower V-8 Porsche engine.
SPORTS
April 27, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Al Holbert has been coming to Riverside International Raceway almost since it was built in the late '50s. He watched his father, Bob, win here. And he has been here every year since the International Motor Sports Assn. came to Riverside in 1975. He has won 47 Camel GT races, more than any IMSA driver in history. He has won at every IMSA track except Riverside. He finished second here in 1979, 1982, 1983 and 1984. He has often said that the one race he wanted most to win was at Riverside.
SPORTS
February 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The team of Al Holbert, Derek Bell and Al Unser Jr., driving a Porsche 962 Prototype, erased deficits of up to 35 laps on the way to victory Sunday in the Sunbank Daytona 24-Hours sports car endurance race. "Lord, am I surprised," said Holbert, who finally added America's most prestigious endurance event to his long list of victories, including the 24 Hours of LeMans. "We were so far out of it," he added. "But we had perseverance and the other guys had their troubles and we just kept after it.
SPORTS
January 4, 1986 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Race drivers can usually trace their roots to one of three sources: --They had a love affair with cars when they were teen-agers, working on them around the clock and racing them anywhere they could find a challenge, the way A. J. Foyt, Bobby Unser and Bill Elliott grew up. --They had wealth and saw racing expensive cars as an exciting diversion that turned into a full-time avocation, as happened with the Whittington brothers, Bill and Don; Josele Garza; Salt Walther, and the late Peter Revson.
SPORTS
April 29, 1985 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Another race at Riverside International Raceway, another bitter disappointment for Al Holbert. During the short walk from his pit at the entrance to pit road to the trailer that will carry his turbo-charged Porsche 962 to the next race, Holbert was in no mood for being philosophical about jinxes or other such nonsense. It is altogether possible that, with the track on the verge of extinction, Holbert will never win an International Motor Sports Assn. race at Riverside.
SPORTS
June 14, 1987
A Porsche 962 driven by defending champions Hans-Joachim Stuck of West Germany, Derek Bell of Britain and American Al Holbert held the lead over a pair of Jaguars early this morning after 12 ours of the Le Mans 24 Hours race. The Porsche, the last remaining factory-built Porsche left in the race, led by three minutes. The trio of drivers won last year, with Bell taking his fourth Le Mans title. The Porsche had completed 174 laps over the 8.
SPORTS
January 31, 1988 | Associated Press
An incredibly close battle among four cars--two Porsche 962s and two Jaguar XJR-9s--rolled into the 10th hour of the Daytona 24-Hour sports car race at Daytona International Speedway early Sunday morning. Defending champions Al Holbert, Chip Robinson and Englishman Derek Bell, sharing one of nine Porsche prototypes in the race, lost the lead near the beginning of the ninth hour when their crew had problems changing the nose of the car during a pit stop.
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