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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
The mother of late Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy.
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SPORTS
August 4, 2009 | Lauren Goldman
The big news Track sensation Carl Lewis gave spectators in the Coliseum the show they had come to see. Establishing himself as the "World's Fastest Human," Lewis won gold in the 100-meter final. Not only did he win, but he ran the distance in 9.99 seconds, beating silver medalist Sam Graddy of the U.S. by eight feet, translating to 0.2 of a second. The margin of victory was an Olympic record, pushing aside Bob Hayes' 1964 victory in which he ran the distance in 10.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mother of Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy. The four-page complaint includes few specific allegations other than the charge that Joyner failed to "exercise reasonable care to avoid foreseeable risk of harm" to his wife and that "harmful or offensive touching" caused her death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner is placing blame for her death on a St. Louis hospital, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years before she died. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on her flight into St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992 | ALAN GREENBERG, HARTFORD COURANT
On April 29, the day the Rodney King verdict was announced, the night the rioting began in Los Angeles, 1984 Olympics gold medalist Al Joyner and his wife, 1988 Seoul superwoman Florence Griffith-Joyner, could not have been further removed from being victimized by the racism that rips apart America: They were dining at the White House with George and Barbara Bush.
SPORTS
October 5, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The civil rights case of Olympic gold medalist Al Joyner--who alleges that his treatment by Los Angeles Police Department officers during two traffic stops caused him to miss a chance at competing in the 1992 Olympic Games--will be heard by a jury today in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Judge Terry J. Hatter had previously ruled that Joyner's civil rights were violated by police officers involved in consecutive traffic stops on May 8, 1992.
SPORTS
May 12, 1992 | JULIE CART
Olympic gold medalist Al Joyner's return to competition has been put on hold after his run-ins with L.A. police last Friday. Joyner was scheduled to compete at two meets on Saturday but did not show. Joyner was driving his wife's sports car along Hollywood Boulevard Friday and was stopped twice within two blocks by police, who said they had reason to believe Joyner had committed felonies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992
Olympic gold medalist and track coach Al Joyner has filed a $2-million claim against the city of Los Angeles, alleging that police officers stopped and handcuffed him because he is black. Joyner said the officers did not explain why they pulled the 32-year-old athlete over on May 8 as he was driving on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, according to the claim filed Thursday. Joyner said he was so humiliated afterward that he could not concentrate on training for the Summer Games in Barcelona.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to pay $245,000 to settle a lawsuit stemming from two 1992 incidents in which track star Al Joyner claimed his false arrest by LAPD officers was so emotionally trying that he was unable to compete in several pre-Olympic trials. The city attorney's office recommended the settlement, which awards $51,501 to Joyner and about $193,000 to his attorneys, the Pasadena-based law firm of Burton & Norris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of track star Florence Griffith Joyner is blaming a St. Louis hospital for her death, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years earlier. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on a flight to St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race. The lawsuit, filed in a Missouri court under pseudonyms, says that hospital workers improperly interpreted an MRI and other tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of track star Florence Griffith Joyner is blaming a St. Louis hospital for her death, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years earlier. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on a flight to St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race. The lawsuit, filed in a Missouri court under pseudonyms, says that hospital workers improperly interpreted an MRI and other tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and DANIEL YI and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A year after friends and relatives laid to rest Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner--eulogized for her devotion to family as much as her athletic prowess--an ugly rift between the sprinter's husband and his in-laws has escalated into a bitter court battle. The family feud went public this week when Griffith Joyner's mother filed a wrongful death lawsuit against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, charging that he played a role in her daughter's sudden death last September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
The mother of late Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mother of Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy. The four-page complaint includes few specific allegations other than the charge that Joyner failed to "exercise reasonable care to avoid foreseeable risk of harm" to his wife and that "harmful or offensive touching" caused her death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a moment, they were whole again: Al, Mary and Florence. Eight months to the day after Al Joyner and his daughter Mary awoke to find Florence Griffith Joyner had passed away in her sleep, her family was on hand Friday in Laguna Hills to unveil a bronze statue of the woman the world knew and loved as FloJo. For Al, the ceremony was heart-rending, especially when he and 8-year-old Mary posed for photographers alongside the statue, both of them leaning in close and hugging the cold metal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999
For just a moment, they were whole again: Al, Mary and Florence. Together. Exactly eight months to the day after Al Joyner and his daughter Mary awoke to find Florence Griffith Joyner had passed away in her sleep, Al and Mary were on hand Friday in Laguna Hills to unveil a bronze statue of the woman the world knew and loved as Flo-Jo.
SPORTS
September 22, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Al Joyner insisted it was love at first sight when he met Florence Griffith during the 1980 Olympic trials. Upon returning to Arkansas State, he called sister Jackie in Los Angeles, where she was a training partner of Florence's, and said, "I'm going to get that Florence Griffith." Jackie laughed. She couldn't imagine her gangly, late-blooming older brother beside a woman with leading-lady looks. Al was undeterred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner is placing blame for her death on a St. Louis hospital, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years before she died. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on her flight into St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race.
SPORTS
March 28, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
The beautiful 8-year-old girl with the curious eyes and the serious expression is wearing her Catholic school plaid jumper. When she returns from a trip to the bathroom, she whispers to her father, "Daddy, everybody was staring at me." And Al Joyner whispers to Mary, "It's because you're so beautiful, honey." Al Joyner is protective of his daughter. He does not want her to think that people might stare or point because they know that she is the daughter of Florence Griffith Joyner.
SPORTS
November 1, 1998 | DIANE PUCIN
Jackie Joyner-Kersee was standing on the playground of a parochial grade school near Mission Viejo last week. She was watching a precocious, athletic 7-year-old do twists and turns on a jungle gym during recess. The third-grader, Mary Ruth Joyner, is Joyner-Kersee's niece. As Joyner-Kersee watched the little tumbler, she said, "I got tears in my eyes. I couldn't help it. In all the time that I knew Florence, it seemed like she always had kids around her. Nieces and nephews and godchildren.
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