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Al Qaeda And Taliban

WORLD
October 13, 2002 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
The search of Amar Gul's hut was yielding little until Pfc. Andrew Johnson happened to notice a poster on the mud-brick wall. There, smiling benevolently, was the face of Osama bin Laden. "Hey, sergeant, you gotta see this!" Johnson shouted to his squad leader, Sgt. 1st Class Wylie Hutchison. Hutchison confronted Gul, a tall ethnic Pushtun with a wild black beard. Gul claimed that the poster belonged to his uncle.
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OPINION
June 30, 2010 | By Rajan Menon
Pakistani authorities have reacted angrily to a study released this month by the London School of Economics, which concludes that Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence has been systematically funding and maintaining top-level ties with the Taliban, and on a larger scale than generally believed. Despite the attention it has garnered, the report affirms what has been common knowledge among academic specialists on Afghanistan and journalists with extensive experience in that country. The ISI, together with the armed forces, has long amounted to a state-within-a state in Pakistan.
WORLD
February 27, 2004 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
Afghan President Hamid Karzai declared Thursday that the Taliban and Al Qaeda are no longer effectively operating in the country, despite a series of recent attacks, including one on Wednesday that killed five aid workers. "Everything that happens in Afghanistan is not terrorist-related," Karzai told reporters during a visit by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. "There is banditry too. There is theft too. There is armed robbery too.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In pointed remarks that raised questions Sunday about future relations between the elected Iranian regime and the United States, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld accused the government in Tehran of helping Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters flee Afghanistan. Asked on ABC's "This Week" if he could confirm a Time magazine report that Iran had aided Islamic militants escaping across the Afghan border, Rumsfeld replied: "I can."
OPINION
February 5, 2013 | By Michael W. Lewis
President Obama's second term begins amid intense criticism of the drone strikes being conducted by the United States in Pakistan. Much of this criticism is based on claims that drones are doing more harm than good. A recent Stanford/NYU study concluded that drones cause excessive civilian casualties and frequently fail to hit leadership targets, and that the presence of drones spreads fear and anxiety among the civilian population, disrupts civilians' daily lives, limits public gatherings and disrupts access to education.
WORLD
January 24, 2009 | Laura King
In the first such strikes since the inauguration of President Obama, suspected U.S. missile barrages Friday killed at least 18 people in the lawless tribal region near the Afghan border, Pakistani officials said. The two raids suggested that the new administration intends to press ahead with attacks against militants in the rural areas, even though the campaign has been politically costly to Pakistan's Western-leaning government.
NEWS
March 20, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interference from Iran is emerging as one of the most vexing problems for allied interests in Afghanistan because the Islamic Republic continues to allow Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters to escape across its border, the director of the CIA told members of Congress on Tuesday. Characterizing Iran's behavior as "worse than schizoid," CIA Director George J.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who claims he was abducted and taken to the Al Qaeda and Taliban mountain base now under siege by the U.S. military estimated Saturday that more than 1,000 fighters are there and said they have managed to remain relatively secure inside their elaborate caves despite heavy American bombing.
WORLD
October 4, 2002 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hidden from the outside world, an escalating war against terrorism in the wild badlands of northwestern Pakistan is feeding a seething anger, and many here are talking of new scores to settle with the United States. The hunt for suspected Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters in the Pushtun tribal areas bordering Afghanistan has turned violent several times during the last few months.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shattered and empty, the mud-brick houses shone blood red in the sunlight. Beyond the village, a small truck sat twisted, black and bullet-riddled. On a hillside, two corpses of enemy fighters lay next to a clothing heap that was in fact the torso of a third--mute testament to the brutality of the battle. For U.S. and Afghan forces, who had waged an intense campaign to clear this mountain redoubt of Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters, it was a day to savor and declare victory.
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