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Al Qaeda Organization

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WORLD
September 29, 2002 | From Reuters
Iraq's most influential newspaper is denying U.S. accusations that Baghdad has links with the Al Qaeda terrorist network, saying Saturday that the allegations are a "stupid new American ploy." The denial in Babel, the newspaper published by President Saddam Hussein's eldest son, Uday, came after top U.S. officials including Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Vice President Dick Cheney alleged links between Iraq and Al Qaeda, which Washington blames for the Sept. 11 attacks.
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WORLD
January 20, 2010 | By Greg Miller
U.S. officials believe that as many as three dozen Americans who converted to Islam while in prison in the United States have traveled to Yemen over the last year, possibly to be trained by Al Qaeda, according to a Senate report. The findings have alarmed U.S. counter-terrorism officials, who think that Al Qaeda has expanded its recruitment efforts in Yemen "to attract nontraditional followers" capable of carrying out more ambitious operations. The report by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee underscores the growing anxiety in the United States about the Al Qaeda offshoot, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, which has claimed responsibility for orchestrating the suspected attempted suicide bombing of a U.S. jetliner bound for Detroit from Amsterdam on Christmas Day. "The Christmas Day plot was a nearly catastrophic illustration of a significant new threat from a network previously regarded as a regional danger, rather than an international one," the report concluded.
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NATIONAL
July 26, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Undercutting new assertions by President Bush, a top U.S. intelligence official testified Wednesday that Al Qaeda's organization in Iraq is overwhelmingly composed of fighters from that country, and that the terrorist network's ability to operate in Pakistan poses the greater danger to the United States.
WORLD
January 16, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
One of Al Qaeda's top military strategists in Yemen was reportedly killed Friday along with five other militants in airstrikes targeting two vehicles in the country's northeastern mountains, according to officials and news agencies. The operation by the Yemeni air force was the latest in a string of attacks on Al Qaeda strongholds and the terrorist network's key operatives. The government, which has been guided by U.S. intelligence in the past, has yet to capture or kill the group's two leaders, but Friday's strikes were an indication that Al Qaeda faces increasing pressure.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | JOSH MEYER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials scrambled Sunday for conclusive evidence that they have captured one of Osama bin Laden's top commanders, and began the process of interrogating the man for information about Al Qaeda terrorist plots that may already be underway.
OPINION
January 11, 2005 | ROBERT SCHEER
Is it conceivable that Al Qaeda, as defined by President Bush as the center of a vast and well-organized international terrorist conspiracy, does not exist? To even raise the question amid all the officially inspired hysteria is heretical, especially in the context of the U.S. media's supine acceptance of administration claims relating to national security.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The band of terrorists who survived the battle for Tora Bora came down the mountain on donkeys Monday, dazed and sick and wounded, hands tied behind their backs with red nylon, their eyes to the ground. There were 18 of them--nine Arabs and nine Afghans. They were young and bearded and caked in dirt. They rode with slumped shoulders. Some cried. Village men and boys lined the dirt track along the way but said nothing as the nameless faces of Osama bin Laden's shattered army passed by.
WORLD
May 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
An audio recording attributed to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden offered rewards in gold Thursday for the killing of top U.S. and U.N. officials in Iraq or of the citizens of any nation fighting there. The 20-minute recording, dated Thursday, appeared on two websites known for militant Islamic messages. The voice sounded like that of Bin Laden and the words were filled with Koranic verse, but the authenticity of the recording could not immediately be verified.
WORLD
January 24, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
KUWAIT CITY -- A Kuwaiti man arrested in connection with the deadly ambush of two American military contractors was described by Kuwaiti and Saudi officials Thursday as an Al Qaeda sympathizer who had been investigated for possible ties to the terrorist network. The accused gunman, 25-year-old Sami Mohammed Marzouq Obeid al Mutairi, a civil servant, was detained Wednesday at the border by Saudi officials, the Kuwaiti Interior Ministry said in a statement Thursday night.
WORLD
January 11, 2010 | Times Wire Services
President Obama says he has no intention of sending American troops to Yemen or Somalia. Obama told People magazine in an interview to be published Friday that he still believes the center of Al Qaeda activity is along the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. "I never rule out any possibility in a world that is this complex," Obama said. However, he said, "in countries like Yemen, in countries like Somalia, I think working with international partners is most effective at this point."
WORLD
January 9, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
A Pakistani television station aired a video Saturday allegedly showing the suicide bomber who hit a CIA outpost in Afghanistan telling the Pakistani Taliban leader that he had shared U.S. and Jordanian intelligence secrets with fellow militants. He also urged militants to strike other U.S. targets in retaliation for the killing of the leader's predecessor last year in a U.S. missile strike. Although its veracity could not be immediately determined, the video is a powerful recruiting tool and its content potentially embarrassing to the U.S. spy agency.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2009 | By Josh Meyer
U.S. counter-terrorism officials on Saturday were looking at possible connections between Al Qaeda-linked militants in Yemen and a 23-year-old Nigerian man charged with attempting to destroy a Northwest Airlines plane on its final approach to Detroit Metropolitan airport. According to a criminal complaint and FBI affidavit, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab carried a destructive device aboard Flight 253 on Christmas Day in what authorities said was an attempted terrorist attack that could have killed all 290 people aboard.
WORLD
December 25, 2009 | By Greg Miller
The Yemeni government said it carried out airstrikes Thursday on a suspected gathering of Al Qaeda operatives and indicated that a radical cleric linked to the shootings at Ft. Hood, Texas, may have been among those killed. "Yemeni fighter jets launched an aerial assault" before dawn on a compound in the southern part of the country, says a statement issued Thursday by the Yemeni Embassy in Washington. Anwar al Awlaki, a cleric who communicated with the accused Ft. Hood gunman before the attack last month at the Army base and who afterward applauded the carnage that left 13 dead, is among those who "were presumed to be at the site," the Yemeni government statement said.
WORLD
October 30, 2009 | Paul Richter
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, visiting Pakistan on a fence-mending tour, turned unusually blunt Thursday, accusing the government of failing to do all it could to track down Al Qaeda. Clinton told a group of journalists in Lahore that she found it "hard to believe that nobody in your government knows where they are and couldn't get them if they really wanted to." Al Qaeda, she said, "has had a safe haven in Pakistan since 2002." Clinton's three-day visit is her first to Pakistan since she became secretary of State, and its principal goal is to improve strained relations.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2009 | Associated Press
A federal judge sentenced an Al Qaeda "sleeper" agent to eight years in prison Thursday -- about half the time prosecutors had requested -- because the agent received what the judge called "unacceptable" treatment in a U.S. Navy brig. U.S. District Judge Michael Mihm could have sentenced Ali Marri to as much as 15 years. Prosecutors had endorsed that, presenting testimony that he remained a threat. But Mihm handed down the lighter sentence of eight years and four months in consideration of what he called "very severe" conditions under which Marri was kept during the almost six years he was held without charges in a U.S. Navy brig in South Carolina.
WORLD
June 24, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The senators who lead the Select Committee on Intelligence said Sunday that they believe Osama bin Laden is alive and his Al Qaeda organization is preparing new attacks against the United States. Their comments came in reaction to the broadcast of an audio interview with a purported Bin Laden spokesman, who said that the terror network's leader is ''in good and prosperous health'' and that ''98% of the leadership'' had survived the American bombing in Afghanistan.
WORLD
December 12, 2008 | Sebastian Rotella, Rotella is a Times staff writer.
In a major anti-terrorism sweep carried out as European leaders arrived in Brussels for a summit, Belgian police on Thursday arrested 14 suspects allegedly linked to Al Qaeda, including one who police believe was close to launching a suicide attack. The arrests were made by 242 officers who conducted 16 searches in Brussels and Liege, while French police arrested two additional suspects tied to the group, anti-terrorism officials said.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2009 | Joby Warrick, Warrick writes for the Washington Post.
The secret CIA program to assassinate top Al Qaeda leaders was outsourced in 2004 to Blackwater USA, the private security contractor whose operations in Iraq prompted intense scrutiny, according to two former intelligence officials familiar with the events. The North Carolina-based company was given operational responsibility for targeting suspected terrorist commanders and was awarded millions of dollars for training and weaponry, but the program was canceled before any missions were conducted, the two officials said.
WORLD
July 18, 2009 | Josh Meyer and John M. Glionna
International suspicion focused on a Malaysian accountant-turned-bomb-maker as the instigator of a pair of hotel blasts in Jakarta on Friday that may signal the reemergence of deadly attacks by Southeast Asian groups affiliated with Al Qaeda, counter-terrorism officials and analysts said.
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