Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlabama Agriculture
IN THE NEWS

Alabama Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Alabama farmers helped by Midwestern hay donations during last year's Southern drought returned the favor Monday when truckloads of hay arrived to help parched Wisconsin dairy farms. "We really appreciate it," said Mark Johnson, 29, one of the dairy farmers receiving hay from Alabama. "The main thing is it's given us some hope. That's going to go farther than the hay itself."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brain tissue from a New York cow is being tested for bovine spongiform encephalitis, so-called "mad cow" disease, because abnormalities were seen when the animal was slaughtered, said experts at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's veterinary science laboratory in Ames, Iowa.. However, results of several tests have shown no signs of the nervous system disorder, said Terry Medley, administrator of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brain tissue from a New York cow is being tested for bovine spongiform encephalitis, so-called "mad cow" disease, because abnormalities were seen when the animal was slaughtered, said experts at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's veterinary science laboratory in Ames, Iowa.. However, results of several tests have shown no signs of the nervous system disorder, said Terry Medley, administrator of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Alabama farmers helped by Midwestern hay donations during last year's Southern drought returned the favor Monday when truckloads of hay arrived to help parched Wisconsin dairy farms. "We really appreciate it," said Mark Johnson, 29, one of the dairy farmers receiving hay from Alabama. "The main thing is it's given us some hope. That's going to go farther than the hay itself."
BUSINESS
December 6, 2008 | Associated Press
For farmers, this stinks: Belching and gaseous cows and hogs could start costing them money if the federal government decides to charge fees for air-polluting animals. Farmers are turning their noses up at the notion, which they contend is a possible consequence of an Environmental Protection Agency report after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2007 that greenhouse gases from motor vehicles amount to air pollution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|