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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday struck down a school prayer law in Alabama, a Bible Belt state where politicians encourage religious expression in classrooms and courtrooms. Michael Chandler, an assistant principal at Valley Head Middle School, fought the 1993 measure requiring all school-related events to permit "non-sectarian, non-proselytizing student-initiated, voluntary prayer."
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NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Even as the Supreme Court is deciding what to do about Arizona's tough law on illegal immigration, the Justice Department has warned Alabama that its law could have “continuing and lasting” consequences for Latino children. In a letter to Alabama education officials released this week, the Justice Department warns of the harmful effect of Alabama's law, known as HB 56. The letter also noted that the Justice Department is charged with enforcing laws that bar “discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin” and helping those for whom English is not a native language.
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NEWS
October 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court says a recent Supreme Court ruling on school prayer does not stop Alabama students from talking about religion or praying publicly at school, as long as it is voluntary. The U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta last week upheld its earlier ruling in Alabama's school prayer case, throwing out parts of a Montgomery federal judge's order that had limited religious expression by students in DeKalb County. The U.S.
OPINION
October 16, 2011
Alabama's Legislature has made children the chief victims of the nation's harshest anti-immigrant law. With its requirement that school officials determine the immigration status of children when they enroll — and with anecdotal reports that students are being grilled by teachers and administrators on the subject — it's small wonder that the absentee rate among Latino children has reportedly skyrocketed. This wrongheaded requirement is part of a law that went into effect this month and that has done little but produce fear and confusion among Alabama's undocumented residents, many of whom are Latino.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
An apparent arson fire left a school in smoldering ruins Saturday and stoked tensions in a dispute over the principal who opposed interracial couples at a prom. The fire gutted all of the Randolph County High School classrooms only hours before marchers planned to form ranks for new protests targeting Principal Hulond Humphries. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno ordered the FBI to investigate, Justice Department spokesman Myron Marlin said Saturday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1987
In the past two weeks I have read that: --The majority of Americans who watched President Reagan's speech on Iran- contra believe he is still lying about the affair. --Public support for the contras has faded along with Olliemania. --A clear majority of Californians would prefer that Gov. George Deukmejian gave the surplus funds to the schools rather than dole it out in rebates. --Ultraconservative Bobbi Fiedler has decided not to run for mayor of Los Angeles after all. --A federal appeals court has overturned the ruling of Reagan appointee Judge Brevard Hand that banned 44 textbooks from Alabama schools.
NEWS
March 18, 1987
A federal judge amended his order banning 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools to permit limited use of four home economics texts. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand rejected pleas of state school officials to allow all 44 to be used for the rest of this school year. Hand ruled March 4 that the 44 books violate the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits the state from advancing religion in public schools.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Wednesday reversed an Alabama judge's order that had banned 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools for promoting what the judge called a godless, humanistic religion. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand's order had turned the First Amendment requirement that the government be neutral on the subject of religion "into an affirmative obligation to speak about religion."
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Friday temporarily suspended a federal judge's ruling that ordered Alabama schools to remove 44 textbooks on the grounds that they violated the Constitution because they promoted secular humanism as a religion. The Alabama Board of Education immediately began telling school officials to return the books to students so they can finish the spring semester.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Lawyers for the Alabama Board of Education sent a notice of appeal to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, seeking reversal of a judge's ruling banning 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools for promoting the "religion" of secular humanism. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand banned the books March 4 on grounds that they promoted humanism as a religion, in violation of the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits the government from establishing a religion.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The death toll from this week's tornadoes continued to climb Saturday morning, making the storms fueled by record winds the second worst in history. As the rescue and relief efforts continued through much of seven states, officials braced for what was being called a humanitarian crisis. Hundreds of thousands of people remained without power; usable water was in demand. In hard-hit Tuscaloosa, the University of Alabama decided to end the school year early. The Alabama Emergency Management Agency on Saturday morning reported that the state's death toll has risen to 254, pushing the region's total to more than 340. Mississippi and Tennessee each reported 34 deaths.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie and Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writers
A tornado pulverized a high school in southern Alabama on Thursday, toppling the roof and killing at least five people as students sought shelter in the hallways. With power still out in most of the city of 21,000, shaken officials in Enterprise called a brief news conference Thursday night to announce a dawn-to-dusk curfew and plead with residents to stay off the streets so rescue vehicles could easily get to the ruins of Enterprise High School.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court says a recent Supreme Court ruling on school prayer does not stop Alabama students from talking about religion or praying publicly at school, as long as it is voluntary. The U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta last week upheld its earlier ruling in Alabama's school prayer case, throwing out parts of a Montgomery federal judge's order that had limited religious expression by students in DeKalb County. The U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Birmingham school board rescinded the superintendent's $30,000 pay raise as a teacher strike protesting the raise left most classrooms deserted for a second day in Alabama's largest city. With the pay raise withdrawn on a 4-0 vote, local Education Assn. President Gwen Sykes said she will recommend teachers return to work today. Supt. Johnny Brown's raise would have been a 20% increase to $181,000 while teachers and other employees received raises of 1.5% or less.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of teachers, bus drivers and lunchroom workers went on strike Monday, protesting a $30,000 raise for the city school superintendent at a time of meager pay increases for other school system employees. Many of the system's 75 schools were virtually empty as teachers picketed the school board office. School officials said 1,264 of the 2,100 to 2,200 teachers in the system were absent--as were about 30,000 of its 38,000 students.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Gov. Fob James has told the U.S. Supreme Court that he believes government officials should defy high court decisions they consider unconstitutional. James made the comments in written arguments filed Friday asking the Supreme Court to overturn the decision of a judge who limited religious practices in DeKalb County schools. On Monday, the governor asked the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse U.S. District Judge Ira DeMent.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
When Judith Whorton read an article on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in her son's eighth-grade civics textbook earlier this year, she was appalled by what she says was left out of the story. "It made no mention of the fact that Martin Luther King was a reverend or a pastor and said nothing about the part black churches and many white evangelical churches played in the civil rights movement," she said.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Even as the Supreme Court is deciding what to do about Arizona's tough law on illegal immigration, the Justice Department has warned Alabama that its law could have “continuing and lasting” consequences for Latino children. In a letter to Alabama education officials released this week, the Justice Department warns of the harmful effect of Alabama's law, known as HB 56. The letter also noted that the Justice Department is charged with enforcing laws that bar “discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin” and helping those for whom English is not a native language.
NEWS
June 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Forrest "Fob" James Jr. urged a federal judge in a school prayer case to defy the U.S. Supreme Court and rule that the Bill of Rights does not apply to states. The high court is plagued by "lawlessness" and must be resisted, the Republican said in asking U.S. District Judge Ira DeMent to throw out a challenge to a 1993 law allowing voluntary prayer in public schools. James said federal courts have no right to interfere in a state's action on school prayer.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday struck down a school prayer law in Alabama, a Bible Belt state where politicians encourage religious expression in classrooms and courtrooms. Michael Chandler, an assistant principal at Valley Head Middle School, fought the 1993 measure requiring all school-related events to permit "non-sectarian, non-proselytizing student-initiated, voluntary prayer."
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