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Alameda Swap Meet

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a boisterous, often contentious public hearing attended by hundreds of people, the city's Building and Safety Commission on Tuesday ordered the El Faro swap meet in South-Central Los Angeles closed, concluding that it has operated for years in violation of building and safety codes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gunfire that erupted Saturday afternoon at a crowded South-Central Los Angeles swap meet sent shoppers ducking for cover and left a 24-year-old security guard dead, his assailant shot in the leg and a bystander slightly wounded. The shooting occurred just after 3 p.m.
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FOOD
October 17, 1991 | JONATHAN GOLD
Next to a Raiders game, the Alameda Swap Meet may be the most overwhelming place you can visit on a Sunday afternoon, an immense converted factory complex south of downtown swarming with people, stuffed with hundreds of stalls selling everything from sea-turtle extract to straw ranchero hats, fluffy white first-communion dresses to the latest in pin-striped gangsta wear, and alive with the racket of two-dozen pumped CD players blasting trumpet-bright norteno hits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a boisterous, often contentious public hearing attended by hundreds of people, the city's Building and Safety Commission on Tuesday ordered the El Faro swap meet in South-Central Los Angeles closed, concluding that it has operated for years in violation of building and safety codes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gunfire that erupted Saturday afternoon at a crowded South-Central Los Angeles swap meet sent shoppers ducking for cover and left a 24-year-old security guard dead, his assailant shot in the leg and a bystander slightly wounded. The shooting occurred just after 3 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the riot, Mee Cho, a merchant at the Alameda Swap Meet, had stocked up on jewelry and pocketbooks in anticipation of a brisk Mother's Day business. But her forethought only heightened her loss. When vandals looted the swap meet south of downtown 10 days ago, Cho lost $15,000 in merchandise. On Saturday, she braced for what she believes will soon happen--the day the thieves tote the goods back and try to sell them to her.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Los Angeles' Nancy Zaslavsky is well-known for her expertise in Mexican cooking, including having written several cookbooks and leading regular field trips to regional market towns. Don't ask why it took her so long to get around to doing the same here in her home town, just be glad she's finally done it. Saturday, Feb. 2, Zaslavsky will lead a carpool tour group through some of the high points of Southern California's Mexican culinary scene. There will be stops at the wholesale food markets downtown, bakeries for pan dulce and tamales, the legendary Alameda Swap Meet, and finally lunch at Bell's beloved La Casita Mexicana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2005 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
The job of Los Inseparables del Norte is to remind Mexicans of the place they had to leave with songs of betrayal and unrequited love. Daily, accordionist Santos Macias and Juan Jose Salazar on bajo sexto guitar traipse through the Alameda Swap Meet, southeast of downtown Los Angeles, to serenade people like themselves who left Mexico as economic outcasts. Macias, for one, was therefore happy that Mexico had finally remembered its immigrants.
SPORTS
January 5, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Veteran boxing trainer Ronnie Shields has instructed multiple world champions, estimating the number to be 15. He predicts he's working with another champion in Glendale super-welterweight Vanes Martirosyan. A 2004 U.S. Olympian, Martirosyan flashed the powerful, fast right hand and stiff jab Friday night that have Shields excited.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two importers said Friday they have gotten the point of a schoolyard controversy and will stop selling novelty pencils that closely resemble hypodermic needles. Outraged parents and teachers had demanded that the two import companies scrap the mechanical pencils, which work like medical syringes. They first surfaced two weeks ago at a South-Central Los Angeles school. The pencils' writing lead is enclosed in fluid-filled, clear-plastic tubes marked in milliliter measurements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the riot, Mee Cho, a merchant at the Alameda Swap Meet, had stocked up on jewelry and pocketbooks in anticipation of a brisk Mother's Day business. But her forethought only heightened her loss. When vandals looted the swap meet south of downtown 10 days ago, Cho lost $15,000 in merchandise. On Saturday, she braced for what she believes will soon happen--the day the thieves tote the goods back and try to sell them to her.
FOOD
October 17, 1991 | JONATHAN GOLD
Next to a Raiders game, the Alameda Swap Meet may be the most overwhelming place you can visit on a Sunday afternoon, an immense converted factory complex south of downtown swarming with people, stuffed with hundreds of stalls selling everything from sea-turtle extract to straw ranchero hats, fluffy white first-communion dresses to the latest in pin-striped gangsta wear, and alive with the racket of two-dozen pumped CD players blasting trumpet-bright norteno hits.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
A letter warning vendors of the Alameda Swap Meet that they would be fined if they failed to remain open the day of the Northridge earthquake has been called an error by the management company after a meeting with the head of the Korean Vendors Assn. The management company called the Jan. 17 letter an unfortunate "mistake," said Charles Yang, general manager of the swap meet at 4501 S. Alameda St. "The fee has been waived. They (vendors) came to my office this morning (Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
When her father was convicted of the murder of a rival gang member and sentenced to life in prison without parole almost three decades ago, Vianna Roman was a 9-year-old girl. In the years since, Danny Roman, federal authorities say, has become a feared member of the Mexican Mafia prison gang. He allegedly controlled a 30-square-mile expanse of gang territory in South L.A. from behind bars in Pelican Bay State Prison. Doing his bidding from 700 miles away — passing down his orders of violence, collecting "taxes" from businesses and other gang members at his behest — was his daughter, federal prosecutors alleged Thursday.
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