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Alan C Ace Greenberg

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BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | ALAN CITRON and JOHN LIPPMAN
For people watching the Paramount Communications circus, one of the best sideshows is the battle of the investment banking stars. It's got chills (reputations are on the line), thrills (what's the strategy?) and even some well-known animal acts (names withheld for obvious reasons). Representing Paramount are Felix G. Rohatyn and Steven Rattner of Lazard Freres & Co. Viacom's friendly bid is being handled by Smith Barney Shearson's Robert Greenhill and Bear Stearns' Alan (Ace) Greenberg.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The sex--$1 million worth--is on Alan "Ace" Greenberg. The chairman of investment firm Bear, Stearns & Co. is donating the pile of money to buy Viagra for poor men. "I made the money and I'm going to give it away any way I want to," Greenberg said Wednesday. "The public interest in Viagra says a lot about how many people have been suffering in silence." It's not the financier's first unusual donation.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The sex--$1 million worth--is on Alan "Ace" Greenberg. The chairman of investment firm Bear, Stearns & Co. is donating the pile of money to buy Viagra for poor men. "I made the money and I'm going to give it away any way I want to," Greenberg said Wednesday. "The public interest in Viagra says a lot about how many people have been suffering in silence." It's not the financier's first unusual donation.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | ALAN CITRON and JOHN LIPPMAN
For people watching the Paramount Communications circus, one of the best sideshows is the battle of the investment banking stars. It's got chills (reputations are on the line), thrills (what's the strategy?) and even some well-known animal acts (names withheld for obvious reasons). Representing Paramount are Felix G. Rohatyn and Steven Rattner of Lazard Freres & Co. Viacom's friendly bid is being handled by Smith Barney Shearson's Robert Greenhill and Bear Stearns' Alan (Ace) Greenberg.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1995
Celebrities have to manage their money too--and some of them are pretty good at it. So eat your heart out, Robin Leach. In their own words, six notables shared their savvy moves with free-lance writer Susan Jaques. Ivana Trump, Businesswoman After my separation and divorce, I needed to invest money received from my marriage settlement. I saw this settlement as my children's future, and the most important thing to me was that it be invested well.
BOOKS
May 19, 1996 | John Balzar, John Balzar is a Times national correspondent
When I was tall enough to reach, my mother taught me to turn out the lights. Nobody ever praised her "wit and wisdom" in this regard, although we did think she was a plenty good mom--despite her nagging. Now, I learn how significant her advice was. She should have gone into business on Wall Street. She should have written down her ideas: "Turn out the lights when you leave a room."
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990
Blue Cross of California has the blues because it thinks that the press is ignoring it, but the health insurer isn't suffering in silence. In a recent letter to the editor of the trade paper Managed HealthCare, Blue Cross Chief Executive Leonard D. Schaeffer complimented the editors for a recent article on the Blue Cross/Blue Shield system. However, he added, "as usual, the Chicago-based Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assn. and the Chicago Plan were interviewed for the article.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Morgan Stanley & Co., Merrill Lynch & Co. and Bear, Stearns & Co. were by far the biggest practitioners last month of the controversial stock market techniques called program trading, according to New York Stock Exchange figures disclosed Monday.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the phantom ill health of thousands of American Airlines pilots that pushed a federal judge to caustically suggest last week that the union might consider notifying the Centers for Disease Control. But modern medicine has nothing in its arsenal to cure this contagion: U.S. workers are calling in sick in record numbers without really being ill.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock speculator John A. Mulheren Jr. took the witness stand in his own defense Wednesday and squarely denied that he had ever made illegal stock trades in the mid-1980s with admitted inside trader Ivan F. Boesky. Mulheren also said he didn't know that Boesky was receiving and trading on inside information during the time the two men had a business relationship.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1987 | STEVE COLL and DAVID A. VISE, The Washington Post and
It was a scene to chill the heart of even the most stalwart chief executive: three Belzbergs relaxing in a sauna on a Sunday morning, talking about whether to launch a hostile takeover bid for a major oil company. They had gathered in William Belzberg's Los Angeles mansion that Sunday, March 16, 1986--first in the bedroom sitting area, later in the sauna--to consider "Project Slugger," a proposed takeover bid for Kentucky-based Ashland Oil Co.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
The management of Pacific Southwest Airlines could scarcely have anticipated having trouble finding an investment firm willing to take it public last year. After all, the chairman of E. F. Hutton, one of the nation's leading investment banking firms, was on its board of directors. But PSA was wrong. Hutton and other firms looked at its financial results, which included more than $13 million in red ink for the 15 months following federal deregulation of the airline industry, and passed.
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