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Alan G Hassenfeld

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BUSINESS
July 6, 1989 | From Times wire services
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., was named today to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive officer of the toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984 and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There's something appropriate about Hasbro Inc.'s new line featuring New Kids on the Block. It's the first venture that smacks of Alan Hassenfeld since he became the new man in charge. Hassenfeld labored for years in the shadow of his older brother Stephen. His brother's death of pneumonia last June at age 47, however, thrust Hassenfeld into the limelight as chairman and chief executive.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1989
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., has been named to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive of the Pawtucket, R.I., toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984, and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said. In a brief statement after his election, Hassenfeld promised to continue the course set by his brother, Stephen, who died on June 25 at age 47.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., has been named to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive of the Pawtucket, R.I., toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984, and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said. In a brief statement after his election, Hassenfeld promised to continue the course set by his brother, Stephen, who died on June 25 at age 47.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There's something appropriate about Hasbro Inc.'s new line featuring New Kids on the Block. It's the first venture that smacks of Alan Hassenfeld since he became the new man in charge. Hassenfeld labored for years in the shadow of his older brother Stephen. His brother's death of pneumonia last June at age 47, however, thrust Hassenfeld into the limelight as chairman and chief executive.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | Associated Press
Hasbro Inc. announced plans to offer popular family games such as Monopoly, Clue, Risk and Battleship to online players through a three-year licensing and distribution partnership with Go2Net Inc. "Games are proving to be the killer application on the Internet," said Alan G. Hassenfeld, chairman and chief executive of Pawtucket, R.I.-based Hasbro. "Our vision is to create the best online games portal, offering mass-market entertainment with branded games for every member of the family."
BUSINESS
October 15, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the biggest licensing deal ever tied to a single entertainment property, Hasbro Inc. and Galoob Toys Inc. announced Tuesday that they had separately reached agreements with Lucasfilm Ltd. for licensing rights to the next three "Star Wars" movies. The companies are giving Lucasfilm combined stock worth more than $225 million, in addition to royalties that should far exceed that amount. The films are expected to reach theaters beginning in 1999.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Hasbro Inc. and Galoob Toys Inc. on Tuesday won the rights to produce toys for the three new "Star Wars" movies in a deal that analysts call the biggest toy licensing agreement ever. While both companies declined to disclose terms of the agreements, "Star Wars" is already the best-selling toy license to date, with millions of dollars in revenue each year. Galoob, meantime, offered almost one-fifth of its stock to the films' producers at an attractive price.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1989 | From Times wire services
Alan G. Hassenfeld, president of Hasbro Inc., was named today to succeed his late brother as chairman and chief executive officer of the toy manufacturer. Hassenfeld, 40, had been second in command at Hasbro since 1984 and his elevation to the chairmanship was widely expected. He will remain president, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
G.I. Joe jilted Barbie, yet it's Joe who's still trying to get over it. Two years after rejecting a $5.2-billion buyout offer from toy industry leader Mattel Inc., No. 2 Hasbro Inc. lags far behind its rival in stock performance and is struggling to justify its decision to stay independent.
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