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NEWS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) expressed remorse for his sharp-tongued criticism of Oklahoma University law professor Anita Faye Hill during the Senate confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. "I have been riding high, a bit too cocky, arrogant, yeah, too smart by half sometimes," Simpson told 300 people at a GOP fund-raiser in Cheyenne. He has been criticized by women's groups and lambasted in newspaper editorials and cartoons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The critic speaketh. No, not yours truly, but Alan K. Simpson, the press-bashing Wyoming Republican who retired this year from the U.S. Senate. "That's censorship!" he proclaimed Wednesday night about the ABC News program "PrimeTime Live" having boiled down 45 hours of hidden camera footage to a string of clips for its controversial 1992 segment charging the Food Lion Inc. supermarket chain with perilously unsanitary practices.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) backed away from several proposals that would make it harder for companies to bring in foreign workers, part of his controversial bill to restrict legal immigration. Simpson, chairman of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee that handles immigration issues, volunteered to eliminate some of the proposed restrictions that had drawn fire from corporate CEOs. One of the bill's key provisions cuts permanent legal-immigration slots from 140,000 per year to 90,000.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
Republican Sen. Alan K. Simpson told a hometown crowd Saturday that he will not seek another term after 17 years in Congress, saying simply, "It is time." Surrounded by his wife and three children, Simpson said he wants to spend more time with his wife and wants to try something new when his term ends in January, 1997. "We are very excited about that, about doing something else," the senator told a crowd of more than 200 at a local chamber of commerce. "We know not what."
NEWS
April 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) is investigating the nation's largest and most powerful seniors organization, the American Assn. of Retired Persons, and its web of business interests. Simpson, speaking Friday at a hearing of a Senate Finance subcommittee on Social Security, said he and his staff are examining the AARP's books, financial interests and hiring practices. John Rother, the group's legislative director, said the AARP's books are open and it has nothing to hide from Simpson.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.), an influential voice in the perennial immigration debate on Capitol Hill, Wednesday unveiled legislation to lower temporarily the number of legal immigrants admitted to the United States and to increase the penalties for those who smuggle immigrants into the country illegally.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
Republican Sen. Alan K. Simpson told a hometown crowd Saturday that he will not seek another term after 17 years in Congress, saying simply, "It is time." Surrounded by his wife and three children, Simpson said he wants to spend more time with his wife and wants to try something new when his term ends in January, 1997. "We are very excited about that, about doing something else," the senator told a crowd of more than 200 at a local chamber of commerce. "We know not what."
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | United Press International
Assistant Minority Leader Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) accused White House reporters Wednesday of doing a "sadistic little disservice to your country" by asking President Reagan questions about Iran for the sole purpose of "sticking it in his bazoo."
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two senior senators vowed Saturday to push for a plan that would let working Americans set aside some of the money they are now required to pay into Social Security to set up private retirement accounts. In return, those in the program would agree to lesser benefits when it comes time to start drawing their own Social Security. Sens. Bob Kerrey (D-Neb.) and Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Republican Sen. Alan K. Simpson, who remained hugely popular among Wyoming voters even as he occasionally raised hackles in Washington with his acerbic wit and attacks on the media, will retire when his third term ends in 1996, Republican sources said Friday. The report on Simpson came the same day that Sen. Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.), as expected, formally declared that he would not seek reelection next year.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Republican Sen. Alan K. Simpson, who remained hugely popular among Wyoming voters even as he occasionally raised hackles in Washington with his acerbic wit and attacks on the media, will retire when his third term ends in 1996, Republican sources said Friday. The report on Simpson came the same day that Sen. Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.), as expected, formally declared that he would not seek reelection next year.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) backed away from several proposals that would make it harder for companies to bring in foreign workers, part of his controversial bill to restrict legal immigration. Simpson, chairman of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee that handles immigration issues, volunteered to eliminate some of the proposed restrictions that had drawn fire from corporate CEOs. One of the bill's key provisions cuts permanent legal-immigration slots from 140,000 per year to 90,000.
NEWS
April 8, 1995 | From Associated Press
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) is investigating the nation's largest and most powerful seniors organization, the American Assn. of Retired Persons, and its web of business interests. Simpson, speaking Friday at a hearing of a Senate Finance subcommittee on Social Security, said he and his staff are examining the AARP's books, financial interests and hiring practices. John Rother, the group's legislative director, said the AARP's books are open and it has nothing to hide from Simpson.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two senior senators vowed Saturday to push for a plan that would let working Americans set aside some of the money they are now required to pay into Social Security to set up private retirement accounts. In return, those in the program would agree to lesser benefits when it comes time to start drawing their own Social Security. Sens. Bob Kerrey (D-Neb.) and Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
Sen. Alan Simpson, one of the most influential Republican voices on immigration matters, opposes cutting off federal benefits to legal immigrants and limiting education for illegal immigrants, a newspaper reported today. "It's almost like they don't understand what a permanent resident alien is," Simpson told the New York Times, criticizing GOP proposals to cut off aid to immigrants living in the United States legally. "The only thing they can't do that you and I can is vote. Period."
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.), an influential voice in the perennial immigration debate on Capitol Hill, Wednesday unveiled legislation to lower temporarily the number of legal immigrants admitted to the United States and to increase the penalties for those who smuggle immigrants into the country illegally.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | LEE MAY and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
In a move that seems to doom attempts to extend the nation's amnesty program for illegal aliens beyond next Wednesday, Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.), co-author of the 1986 immigration law, Tuesday called the effort a "fantasy" that would only raise false hopes.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cable News Network correspondent Peter Arnett said Tuesday that being able to conduct unrehearsed question-and-answer sessions with CNN anchors "saved my reputation" during his weeks in Baghdad during the Persian Gulf War. In his first public account of his time in the enemy capital since he left Baghdad on March 8, Arnett seemed unperturbed by criticism from some on the political right that he was a dupe of the Iraqi government.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) expressed remorse for his sharp-tongued criticism of Oklahoma University law professor Anita Faye Hill during the Senate confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. "I have been riding high, a bit too cocky, arrogant, yeah, too smart by half sometimes," Simpson told 300 people at a GOP fund-raiser in Cheyenne. He has been criticized by women's groups and lambasted in newspaper editorials and cartoons.
NEWS
October 11, 1991
Step aside, insurance company executives, now you have the insurance commissioner of California trying to force the no-fault program down the throats of our fine state's motorists. In his perspective on auto insurance ("No-Fault: a Safe Way to Save," Commentary, Oct. 1), John Garamendi appears to have changed horses while in midstream. You may recall in his election campaign, he swore to make the insurance companies adhere to the guidelines set forth in Proposition 103.
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