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Alan Lloyd

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2006 | Janet Wilson, Time Staff Writer
California Environmental Protection Agency Secretary Alan Lloyd will step down at the end of February, a little more than a year after he was appointed, just as major battles are shaping up over the effects of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's far-reaching infrastructure and air emissions plans. Lloyd, who turned 64 on Tuesday, said he was retiring for personal reasons. His wife remained in Reno while Lloyd took the post, overseeing half a dozen powerful air and water agencies in the state.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2002 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adopting a conciliatory tone toward California's new vehicle emissions law, Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive William Clay Ford Jr. said Wednesday he hopes to "lower the temperature" of the debate over automotive greenhouse gases. Auto makers say they plan to file suit against a law signed by Gov. Gray Davis last month that will greatly restrict the gases emitted by cars and trucks that contribute to global warming, primarily carbon dioxide.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
The technology exists to solve California's automotive smog problems by 2010, according to a University of California automotive emissions study to be released today. However, the findings already have come under fire: The California Air Resources Board, one of the study's sponsors, said Monday that the conclusion is based on unattainable expectations.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2002 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the California Air Resources Board expressed hope Tuesday that the state and the auto industry could work out their differences over California's new law cracking down on so-called greenhouse gas emissions. Speaking at an annual summer auto conference in northern Michigan, CARB Chairman Alan Lloyd said Gov. Gray Davis had instructed him to meet with auto executives after the industry vowed to fight the legislation in court.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a major reshuffling of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's top staff, Deputy Executive Officer Pat Leyden will assume broad new powers, including overall responsibility for development of a sweeping new emissions credit trading program and enforcement of smog regulations. The changes, which include the elimination of several top management positions for a savings of $500,000 a year, were ordered by Executive Officer James M. Lents and are to take effect April 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new state requirement that auto makers begin selling electric cars in California came under scrutiny Tuesday night at a hearing, where some state legislators said the mandate would not help low-income communities. Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), who chairs the Assembly's Budget Committee, said he called the hearing at Pacoima Middle School over concerns that the California Air Resources Board's vote last month might also have failed to include input from these communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California air quality officials are expected today to announce a new initiative to help get more alternative-fuel cars and trucks on the road to help cut soot and smog. The California Natural Gas Vehicle Partnership is an effort by business and government leaders to close ranks behind a series of regulations that Los Angeles-area smog fighters recently approved to convert fleets of taxis, trash trucks, shuttle buses and other vehicles to clean fuels.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's plan to spend $1.2 billion to further hydrogen-fuel research probably would help speed up development of fuel-cell vehicles and provide California businesses with increased opportunities to profit from the new technologies, industry experts say. Although automotive fuel-cell development has been in the works for at least the last five years, the president's proposal to more than double federal funding for hydrogen-fuel research is seen as critical to increasing momentum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson
Supermarket executive Alan L. Haberman called the now-ubiquitous bar-code design he helped will into existence the "little footprint" that changed the retail world. He was motivated not by slim profit margins, he later said, but by the dismal state of the pre-automated checkout stand in the early 1970s. It was "the least pleasant experience in a store," Haberman told Smithsonian magazine in 1999, because people "hated having to wait in line!" Haberman chaired the industry committee that settled on the bar-code symbol in 1973.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2006 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Oil giant BP and Edison International said Friday that they would spend $1 billion to build a one-of-a-kind hydrogen power plant in Carson to supply the region with badly needed electricity without polluting the air. Slated for completion in 2011 next to BP's Carson oil refinery, the 500-megawatt facility would be the world's largest hydrogen-fired power plant, churning out enough electricity to serve more than 300,000 average homes, executives said at a news conference that drew Gov.
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