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Alan Pakula

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NEWS
November 20, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Pakula, the producer and director of more than two dozen motion pictures, including such hits as "Klute," "Sophie's Choice" and "All the President's Men," died Thursday in a New York automobile accident. He was 70. Police in Suffolk County said Pakula was driving on the Long Island Expressway about 30 miles east of Manhattan when a metal pipe crashed through his windshield, striking him in the head. Severely injured, Pakula lost control of his 1995 Volvo, which crashed into a fence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1998 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Note: Producer-director Alan J. Pakula died Thursday in an automobile accident in New York. The 70-year-old Pakula is best known for films he directed--"All the President's Men," "Sophie's Choice" and "Klute"--and for "To Kill a Mockingbird," which he produced. The following is an appreciation of his work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Can taste be a function of drive? On the edge of turning 40, Alan Pakula was a thriving movie producer ("To Kill a Mockingbird") whose need--To direct? To stand out?--turned him into a movie director ("Sophie's Choice"). Very few producers, age 40 or not, rich or not, make the leap Pakula made.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Pakula, the producer and director of more than two dozen motion pictures, including such hits as "Klute," "Sophie's Choice" and "All the President's Men," died Thursday in a New York automobile accident. He was 70. Police in Suffolk County said Pakula was driving on the Long Island Expressway about 30 miles east of Manhattan when a metal pipe crashed through his windshield, striking him in the head. Severely injured, Pakula lost control of his 1995 Volvo, which crashed into a fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Film making is a sequence of choices, and adapting Scott Turow's best-selling novel "Presumed Innocent" to the screen involved a formidable assortment of them. Courtroom dramas have been popular ever since the movies learned to talk, and the best of them (to cite only three: "Witness for the Prosecution," "The Paradine Case," more recently "The Verdict") generate wonderful helpings of suspense and surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Naturalistic or social drama these days--except in independent movies--has become another endangered species. If a director or writer wants to tackle a serious theme, he usually has to join it to comedy, romance or violence. Rarely--increasingly rarely--a prestigious book ("The Color Purple," "Out of Africa") or stage play ("Agnes of God") will be adapted--but again, only at the insistence of a star or director with clout. (Meryl Streep does yeoman service here.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Love and action have always run a close race as the prime ingredients of the movies. The earliest artifacts of the form include both a famous flickering kiss and "The Great Train Robbery." Over the decades, scripts more often than not have been a mixture of the two: A little romance to top off the action, a little action to spell the romantically talking heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1998 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Note: Producer-director Alan J. Pakula died Thursday in an automobile accident in New York. The 70-year-old Pakula is best known for films he directed--"All the President's Men," "Sophie's Choice" and "Klute"--and for "To Kill a Mockingbird," which he produced. The following is an appreciation of his work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1998
A memorial service for producer and director Alan J. Pakula is scheduled for Feb. 4 in New York City. Pakula died Nov. 19 in an accident on New York's Long Island Expressway when a metal pipe crashed through his windshield and struck him in the head. He was 70. The service will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Broadhurst Theater at 235 W. 44th St. in Manhattan. Donations in the filmmaker's honor can be made to the Alan J. Pakula Memorial Fund at the American Film Institute, 2021 N. Western Ave.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989 | Leonard Klady
Harrison Ford has nabbed the choice lead in Mirage/Warner Bros' "Presumed Innocent," to film in July for director Alan Pakula. The thriller, based on Scott Turow's bestseller and adapted by Oscar-winner Frank Pierson, concerns an investigator for the district attorney's office who is assigned to look into the murder of his former mistress.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Film making is a sequence of choices, and adapting Scott Turow's best-selling novel "Presumed Innocent" to the screen involved a formidable assortment of them. Courtroom dramas have been popular ever since the movies learned to talk, and the best of them (to cite only three: "Witness for the Prosecution," "The Paradine Case," more recently "The Verdict") generate wonderful helpings of suspense and surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Love and action have always run a close race as the prime ingredients of the movies. The earliest artifacts of the form include both a famous flickering kiss and "The Great Train Robbery." Over the decades, scripts more often than not have been a mixture of the two: A little romance to top off the action, a little action to spell the romantically talking heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Naturalistic or social drama these days--except in independent movies--has become another endangered species. If a director or writer wants to tackle a serious theme, he usually has to join it to comedy, romance or violence. Rarely--increasingly rarely--a prestigious book ("The Color Purple," "Out of Africa") or stage play ("Agnes of God") will be adapted--but again, only at the insistence of a star or director with clout. (Meryl Streep does yeoman service here.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Can taste be a function of drive? On the edge of turning 40, Alan Pakula was a thriving movie producer ("To Kill a Mockingbird") whose need--To direct? To stand out?--turned him into a movie director ("Sophie's Choice"). Very few producers, age 40 or not, rich or not, make the leap Pakula made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Trudeau Trivia: Garry Trudeau's "Doonesbury" strip marks its 20th anniversary in syndication. In a Newsweek cover story, Trudeau says he is writing a "MASH-like" black comedy with director Alan Pakula about AIDS researchers and also reveals that he works half a day each week at a New York City center for the homeless.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Woody Allen, Francis Coppola, John Huston, Martin Scorsese, Bernardo Bertolucci and more than 50 other key film directors have formed Filmmakers United Against Apartheid, it was announced Monday. The organization intends to make movies part of the United Nations-endorsed cultural boycott of South Africa and will present a petition saying as much to distributors of films made or financed in the United States.
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