Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlan Shepard
IN THE NEWS

Alan Shepard

NEWS
August 2, 1998 | Associated Press
In a heartfelt memorial, the four remaining members of the Mercury 7 astronauts paid tribute Saturday to Alan B. Shepard Jr., who led them and all of America into space. "Alan Shepard was many things," said Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio), who at age 77 is scheduled to fly into space again in October. "He was a patriot, he was a leader, he was a competitor, a fierce competitor. He was a hero. Most importantly to us, he was a close friend."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Five of the Mercury 7 astronauts, America's first and perhaps most beloved space explorers, returned to their history-making roots Friday to help dedicate the Astronaut Hall of Fame. "We don't sit around getting nostalgic," said Donald (Deke) Slayton, now 66. "We're trying to make things happen for the future." The United States Astronaut Hall of Fame, 13 miles from where the men rocketed into history three decades ago, is a tribute to their exploits.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Stuart A. Roosa, who piloted the command module that orbited the moon during the third lunar landing mission in 1971, died Monday at Fairfax Hospital at age 61. The cause of death was not disclosed. Roosa, who was president and owner of Gulf Coastal Coors Inc. in Gulfport, Miss., a beer distributor, served for 10 years in NASA's astronaut corps, logging all of his space flight time on the Apollo 14 lunar mission. Born in Durango, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1988
Four people who were killed when their car was struck head-on by a truck were identified Sunday as a Valley Center couple and their two young children. The accident occurred about 7:30 p.m. Saturday on Valley Center Road, north of Lake Wohlford Road, when the left front tire of a southbound 3-ton flatbed truck blew out, causing the truck to cross the center line and collide with the family's northbound car, said a California Highway Patrol spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Howard Benedict, 77, who in a 37-year career with Associated Press covered more than 2,000 missile and rocket launches, including 65 manned flights, from Alan Shepard's historic ride in 1961 to the 34th shuttle mission in 1990, died of natural causes Monday at his home in Cocoa, Fla. A native of Sioux City, Iowa, Benedict wrote for the military newspaper Pacific Stars and Stripes during the Korean War. After his discharge, he completed his journalism education at Northwestern University.
NEWS
August 28, 1998
Dr. Francesco Crucitti, 67, surgeon to Pope John Paul II. Crucitti operated on the pope three times--in 1981 repairing damage from gunshot wounds to the pontiff's abdomen, in 1992 removing a benign tumor from the pope's colon and in 1996 removing his appendix. Born in Reggio Calabria, Italy, Crucitti finished medical school at age 22 and specialized in general surgery and cancer research. He had been director of the Institute of General Surgery at Catholic University in Rome since 1967.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Nelson is a Times staff writer.
Jay Fiondella, the flamboyant owner of Chez Jay, the scruffy restaurant-bar he opened almost 50 years ago that became a Santa Monica landmark and something of a shrine to his exploits as an adventurer, has died. He was 82. Fiondella died Nov. 6 at a Santa Monica care facility after a long battle with Parkinson's disease, his family said.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Veteran ABC News science editor Jules Bergman, believed to be the nation's first network correspondent to hold that position full-time, was found dead in his Manhattan apartment Thursday. Police said Bergman, 57, whose body was discovered by a maid, apparently died of natural causes. An ABC network spokeswoman said an autopsy will be made to determine the cause of Bergman's death. He had undergone an operation for a brain tumor several years ago, but had returned to work, she said.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | Associated Press
Minnie, the last surviving "astro-chimp" from the early days of the space program, has died at age 41. Once an understudy for the space-going chimpanzees Ham and Enos, Minnie died March 14 of old age, Coulston Foundation spokesman Don McKinney said. The private medical research lab has overseen the space chimps at Holloman Air Force Base since 1993. Minnie was the only female chimp trained for the Mercury Project in the early 1960s, but she never flew.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|