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Alan Tudyk

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August 12, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Alan TUDYK applied a lot of sunblock for his latest film, the raucous British black comedy "Death at a Funeral," which opens Friday. "I'm fair," says the affable redhead. "And places of me were exposed to the sun that hadn't seen the sun in I don't know how long."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Daniel Miller and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The surprise box office success of the uplifting Jackie Robinson biographical film "42" suggests that audiences are ready for a PG-13-rated movie filled with coarse, racially charged language. It also raises questions about whether children should see it, and at what age. In the picture, which grossed $27.5 million over the weekend, a variety of slurs are directed at the ballplayer, the first African American major leaguer, who began playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Most pointedly, he is called the N-word many times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Sid Smith, Chicago Tribune
"Death at a Funeral" is lethal farce, combining hints of "The Lavender Hill Mob," doses of Joe Orton and a smidgen of the Farrelly brothers' scatology in its mix. It's sillier but funnier than "Knocked Up," the summer's other notable comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Jackie Robinson biopic "42," which opened in theaters nationwide Friday, presents an opportune moment for adults to have meaningful conversations with their kids about the history of racism in the United States. But with that opportunity comes an array of challenges, especially for younger audiences keen on seeing a story of an iconic sports hero. It really comes down to language. Given a PG-13 rating for "thematic elements including language" from the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Daniel Miller and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The surprise box office success of the uplifting Jackie Robinson biographical film "42" suggests that audiences are ready for a PG-13-rated movie filled with coarse, racially charged language. It also raises questions about whether children should see it, and at what age. In the picture, which grossed $27.5 million over the weekend, a variety of slurs are directed at the ballplayer, the first African American major leaguer, who began playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Most pointedly, he is called the N-word many times.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Brian Helgeland, writer and director of the Jackie Robinson biographical film "42," expected his new movie would get an R rating from the Motion Picture Assn. of America. After all, the film, which was produced by Legendary Pictures and is being released by Warner Bros. Friday, is filled with coarse, racially charged language. In the picture, a variety of slurs are directed at the famed Brooklyn Dodger who was the first African American major leaguer. Most pointedly, he is called the N-word many times.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Jackie Robinson biopic "42," which opened in theaters nationwide Friday, presents an opportune moment for adults to have meaningful conversations with their kids about the history of racism in the United States. But with that opportunity comes an array of challenges, especially for younger audiences keen on seeing a story of an iconic sports hero. It really comes down to language. Given a PG-13 rating for "thematic elements including language" from the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2009 | David Ng
Promoters for the stage production "An Evening Without Monty Python" announced Wednesday that Hank Azaria has withdrawn from the show because of a film commitment. Jeff B. Davis, a comedy and improv actor, will replace him. Cast members include Jane Leeves, Alan Tudyk, Rick Holmes and Jim Piddock. "An Evening Without Monty Python" has 10 performances in Hollywood, Sept. 23 through Oct. 4, at the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. It will then play five performances at Town Hall in New York, starting Oct. 6. Eric Idle will co-direct with B.T. McNicholl.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hell-raising, beautiful college kids heading for the Appalachians — what could go wrong? How about a couple of bearded woodsmen dragging one of those weekenders, a blond beauty, back to their dilapidated cabin? "Tucker & Dale vs. Evil" is a farce of misunderstanding first, body-count nightmare second and at nearly all times a refreshingly upending horror-comedy bromance. The titular hillbillies — shy, sweet Dale (Tyler Labine) and his best friend Tucker (Alan Tudyk) — are director/co-writer Eli Craig's genre-redemption project, peaceful rednecks hoping for some R&R who save a girl (Katrina Bowden)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bracing for terrible news about their only child, the couple at the center of "Beautiful Boy" must endure an even worse truth: Not only has he died in a school shooting, but he was the shooter. The focus of this well-observed, low-key drama isn't teen despair or media spectacle but the emotional fallout for the boy's parents, played with uncompromising intensity by Maria Bello and Michael Sheen. First-time feature director Shawn Ku avoids therapeutic bromides about closure as he ventures into an unmapped zone of grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Brian Helgeland, writer and director of the Jackie Robinson biographical film "42," expected his new movie would get an R rating from the Motion Picture Assn. of America. After all, the film, which was produced by Legendary Pictures and is being released by Warner Bros. Friday, is filled with coarse, racially charged language. In the picture, a variety of slurs are directed at the famed Brooklyn Dodger who was the first African American major leaguer. Most pointedly, he is called the N-word many times.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Sid Smith, Chicago Tribune
"Death at a Funeral" is lethal farce, combining hints of "The Lavender Hill Mob," doses of Joe Orton and a smidgen of the Farrelly brothers' scatology in its mix. It's sillier but funnier than "Knocked Up," the summer's other notable comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Alan TUDYK applied a lot of sunblock for his latest film, the raucous British black comedy "Death at a Funeral," which opens Friday. "I'm fair," says the affable redhead. "And places of me were exposed to the sun that hadn't seen the sun in I don't know how long."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011
SERIES Rocket City Rednecks: This new documentary series profiles five self-proclaimed "rednecks" from Huntsville, Ala., home of NASA's Marshall Flight Center, who all have advanced degrees (6, 6:30 and 7; 9, 9:30 and 10 p.m. National Geographic). Free Agents: In this new episode Alex (Hank Azaria) is dismayed to find Stephen (Anthony Head) has assigned Emma (Natasha Leggero) to a new account, while, Helen (Kathryn Hahn) sees a therapist (Ian Anthony Dale) (8:30 p.m. NBC).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Susan King
Disney's "Wreck-It Ralph" was named best animated film of 2012 at the 40th Annie Awards on Saturday evening at UCLA's Royce Hall. Rich Moore also was named best director for the animated comedy about a video game villain who dreams of being a hero, and Alan Tudyk won the Annie for voice acting as King Candy in the box-office hit. Phil Johnston and Jennifer Lee won for their screenplay and Henry Jackman, Skrillex, Adam Young, Matthew Thiessen, Jamie...
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