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Alaska Airlines

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2003 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco has reopened its criminal investigation of the crash of an Alaska Airlines jetliner off the coast of Ventura County three years ago, sources close to the case said Thursday. The investigation had been suspended until the National Transportation Safety Board concluded its investigation of the crash, which killed all 88 aboard Flight 261 from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, to San Francisco on Jan. 31, 2000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Radar and voice communication tapes show that a near midair collision between a commercial jetliner and a small plane last week was much closer than previously thought. Alaska Airlines Flight 240, an MD-80 with 49 people aboard a flight from Seattle, came within 100 to 200 feet of a twin-engine Piper Navajo at 6:08 p.m. Thursday, Federal Aviation Administration officials said. Both planes were on final approach to the same runway just before crossing the San Diego Freeway, the FAA said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2006 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Six passengers on an Alaska Airlines jet that suddenly lost pressure when a hole opened in its fuselage sued the airline and its baggage handlers Friday. No one was seriously hurt when a 12-inch gash split the fuselage on the Dec. 26 flight from Seattle to Burbank. But James P. Kreindler, an attorney for the passengers, said in a statement that his clients' "lives are profoundly challenged by what they thought was their near-death experiences....
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Alaska Airlines completed all 17 inspections of MD-80 aircraft midday Friday, the day after announcing that a tool used to measure stresses on the jets' tail sections may have given the wrong readings. Alaska spokesman Jack Evans said measurements did not show any additional wear and tear and the planes were back in service. Alaska said the tool, which the airline makes, could measure stresses on jackscrews in the MD-80s' horizontal stabilizers incorrectly.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the recent Alaska Airlines crash, airlines quickly embraced a federal order to inspect a suspect part on hundreds of jetliners, saying that the reviews should ease any concern among the flying public. But nine months earlier, when the Federal Aviation Administration ordered airlines to inspect another part of the same stabilizer mechanism on MD-80s, the response was much less enthusiastic.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times
Fees are rising, service can be lousy and … airline passengers are happier? Yes, according to a customer satisfaction survey released Tuesday. Research company J.D. Power & Associates asked more than 12,300 passengers who flew between April 2009 and April this year to rate North American airlines on costs and fees, flight crew, in-flight services, aircraft, boarding/deplaning/baggage, check-in and reservations. Compared with last year's survey, "performance improved across the board," said Stuart Greif, vice president and general manager of the global travel and hospitality practice at J.D. Power, based in Westlake Village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2000 | JEFFREY RABIN and STANLEY HOLMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As recovery efforts continued Sunday at the site of the Alaska Airlines crash off the Ventura County coast, federal investigators retrieved the flight data recorder from an Alaska jet that was forced to return to Reno on Saturday evening when the pilot reported problems with the motors on the plane's horizontal stabilizer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2003 | Eric Malnic and Li Fellers, Times Staff Writers
The Boeing Co. and Alaska Airlines won't contest their liability in the crash three years ago of Alaska's Flight 261 off Point Mugu under an agreement approved Tuesday, clearing the way for the resolution of outstanding claims and protecting the firms from further scrutiny by families of the victims.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Aviation Administration on Monday proposed a fine of nearly $1-million against Alaska Airlines for sloppy maintenance and for flying planes with inoperative equipment that had not been properly repaired. Part of the fine is sought for flying one plane that had problems with an important navigational instrument and for flying another on hundreds of flights without a flight data recorder, which is a critical aid to air crash investigators.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday's crash of an Alaska Airlines MD-83 jetliner marred the record of one of the most widely used aircraft types in the world, a twin-engine jet that has established a solid safety history. Alaska's upkeep of its MD-80 series aircraft has been the subject of a probe by a federal grand jury in San Francisco, and the Federal Aviation Administration last year examined whether Alaska executives falsified records to cover up faulty maintenance of MD-80s. Boeing Co.'
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