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NATIONAL
March 2, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - Now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the yearlong process that could lead to halting construction on the controversial Pebble Mine, stakeholders in Alaska's bountiful Bristol Bay are weighing in. There is celebration over what could be possible protection for the world's most productive sockeye salmon fishery. There is wariness about a process that could impede progress on the largest open pit mine in North America. And there is also a lot of anger up in the Last Frontier, where many of the region's deeply independent residents bristle at what they view as the federal government's meddling in their affairs.
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NATIONAL
March 2, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - Now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the yearlong process that could lead to halting construction on the controversial Pebble Mine, stakeholders in Alaska's bountiful Bristol Bay are weighing in. There is celebration over what could be possible protection for the world's most productive sockeye salmon fishery. There is wariness about a process that could impede progress on the largest open pit mine in North America. And there is also a lot of anger up in the Last Frontier, where many of the region's deeply independent residents bristle at what they view as the federal government's meddling in their affairs.
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NEWS
August 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A federal appeals court ruled today that Alaska natives, normally exempt from a moratorium on killing rare marine mammals, may be criminally prosecuted if their killing of the animals is found "wasteful." The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholds the constitutionality of a provision of the Marine Mammal Protection Act regulating wasteful killing of marine mammals by Indians, Aleuts or Eskimos.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took the first step Friday toward possibly halting construction of the largest open-pit mine in North America, declaring that Alaska's Bristol Bay -- home to the most productive sockeye salmon fishery on Earth -- must be protected from what could be irreversible damage. "Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Friday in announcing the agency's decision.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eskimos, Indians and Aleuts declared war against a disease ravaging their people: alcoholism. A blue ribbon commission of native leaders stood before the 1,000 delegates to the Alaska Federation of Natives convention and before many more watching on statewide television in some 200 villages and begged Alaska's aboriginal people to give up liquor. Alcohol is linked to nearly all violence, injuries and suicides involving Alaska natives, who make up 15% of the state's population.
OPINION
April 19, 2010
Tongass: An April 14 editorial said that a federal agreement with Alaska Natives had been put on hold over environmental concerns. It also implied that all of the lumbering land in the deal would be used for clear-cutting. In fact, the agreement was delayed for other reasons, and some of the land would be used for other kinds of lumbering activities.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Green Bay has a black police officer for the first time in the 152-year history of its department. Solomon Ayres starts the first phase of a 17-week training regime this week. Ayres says he expects some resistance from both black and white residents, but thinks his life experiences will help defuse difficult situations and make him open to different points of view. Census figures show that African Americans make up about 2.5% of Green Bay's more than 98,000 people. The department has 177 officers, including 15 women, four American Indians or Alaska natives and one Latino.
OPINION
April 13, 2010
With both the environmental and economic tides turning against clear-cutting in the Tongass National Forest, two members of Congress have nonetheless written legislation to give up to 85,000 acres of prime forest land to an Alaska corporation, all but about 20,000 acres of it for clear-cutting. The bill by Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Rep. Don Young, both Republicans from Alaska, is as cynical as it is ill-timed. The company that would receive the land, Sealaska Corp., is owned by Alaska Natives; the giveaway would be part of a long-standing settlement that was never finalized because of environmental concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1990
John Balzar's article read like an oil-industry handout. He was obviously taken in by the dog-and-pony show presented by the Arctic oil interests. They somehow convinced him that enormous pressures were building up to open the range to oil drilling. They employed an obviously compromised Fish-and-Wildlife "scientist" to support their specious argument that development will not unduly harm the wildlife habitat. It's too bad that Balzar didn't do his homework and review the 10-year debate on the development of the range, the volumes of testimony contained in environmental impact statements, the interests of Alaska Natives in the area or Canada's strong opposition to the development of the caribou-calving areas.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | Kari Lydersen, Washington Post
Hubert Kokuluk squints with his one good eye to examine the tiny polar bear he has just carved from a fragment of walrus tusk. He isn't happy with the yellowish hue, but good ivory is hard to come by these days, since quickly melting sea ice has made it extremely difficult for his Inupiaq Eskimo community to carry out the traditional annual spring walrus hunt. Though walruses are federally protected, Alaska Natives have subsistence rights to hunt them and rely on the meat, skin, intestines and tusks -- for food, clothing and boat coverings and to carve the ivory jewelry and souvenirs that are a significant source of income.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The largest open-pit mine in North America, proposed for Alaska's wild and remote Bristol Bay region, would have a devastating effect on the world's biggest sockeye salmon fishery and the Alaska Natives and fishermen who depend on it, according to a federal report released Wednesday. After completing three years of scientific study, conducting eight hearings and sifting through more than a million public comments, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that the proposed Pebble Mine could destroy up to 94 miles of streams where salmon spawn and migrate and up to 5,350 acres of wetlands, ponds and lakes.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Amina Khan
When it comes to preventable deaths and disease, smoking is still a top killer in the U.S., says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 443,000 people die from cigarette smoking each year, and 8.6 million suffer from a serious illness related to smoking, according to the Tobacco Control State Highlights 2012. Utah claimed the lowest adult smoking rate of 11.8%, according to the report released last week, while Kentucky topped the charts with 29%. California hovered above Utah at 13.7%.
OPINION
April 19, 2010
Tongass: An April 14 editorial said that a federal agreement with Alaska Natives had been put on hold over environmental concerns. It also implied that all of the lumbering land in the deal would be used for clear-cutting. In fact, the agreement was delayed for other reasons, and some of the land would be used for other kinds of lumbering activities.
OPINION
April 13, 2010
With both the environmental and economic tides turning against clear-cutting in the Tongass National Forest, two members of Congress have nonetheless written legislation to give up to 85,000 acres of prime forest land to an Alaska corporation, all but about 20,000 acres of it for clear-cutting. The bill by Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Rep. Don Young, both Republicans from Alaska, is as cynical as it is ill-timed. The company that would receive the land, Sealaska Corp., is owned by Alaska Natives; the giveaway would be part of a long-standing settlement that was never finalized because of environmental concerns.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
Decades after many of America's national forests have been tamed into tree farms and campgrounds, the Tongass National Forest stands as a reminder of what wilderness once was. Beneath its 800-year-old stands of Sitka spruce and Western hemlock lurks a mossy hush, a thick, verdant silence. But even the 17-million-acre crown jewel of the national forest system has not been immune to the demands of the dollar. Years of heavy logging laid bare large swaths of the forest, especially on Prince of Wales Island, where entire hillsides were shaved by clear cuts.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Green Bay has a black police officer for the first time in the 152-year history of its department. Solomon Ayres starts the first phase of a 17-week training regime this week. Ayres says he expects some resistance from both black and white residents, but thinks his life experiences will help defuse difficult situations and make him open to different points of view. Census figures show that African Americans make up about 2.5% of Green Bay's more than 98,000 people. The department has 177 officers, including 15 women, four American Indians or Alaska natives and one Latino.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Amina Khan
When it comes to preventable deaths and disease, smoking is still a top killer in the U.S., says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 443,000 people die from cigarette smoking each year, and 8.6 million suffer from a serious illness related to smoking, according to the Tobacco Control State Highlights 2012. Utah claimed the lowest adult smoking rate of 11.8%, according to the report released last week, while Kentucky topped the charts with 29%. California hovered above Utah at 13.7%.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took the first step Friday toward possibly halting construction of the largest open-pit mine in North America, declaring that Alaska's Bristol Bay -- home to the most productive sockeye salmon fishery on Earth -- must be protected from what could be irreversible damage. "Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Friday in announcing the agency's decision.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2009 | Kim Murphy
It has always been a match made in peril: One of the biggest copper and gold mines in the world perched in the watershed above Bristol Bay, Alaska -- the last, best refuge for millions of Pacific wild salmon. The proposed Pebble Mine would dwarf all the others operating in the Alaskan wilderness and generate up to 9 billion tons of ore, most of which would have to be sifted and disposed of near the ponds and streams that feed into Bristol Bay.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | Kari Lydersen, Washington Post
Hubert Kokuluk squints with his one good eye to examine the tiny polar bear he has just carved from a fragment of walrus tusk. He isn't happy with the yellowish hue, but good ivory is hard to come by these days, since quickly melting sea ice has made it extremely difficult for his Inupiaq Eskimo community to carry out the traditional annual spring walrus hunt. Though walruses are federally protected, Alaska Natives have subsistence rights to hunt them and rely on the meat, skin, intestines and tusks -- for food, clothing and boat coverings and to carve the ivory jewelry and souvenirs that are a significant source of income.
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