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Albania Revolts

NEWS
March 13, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Sali Berisha and his political opposition agreed Wednesday on a new, coalition government, while Washington ordered the evacuation of most of its diplomatic community amid growing panic over unrest sweeping this small Balkan country. Looters raided military ammunition depots in Tirana for the first time as a frenzied effort to seize guns spread.
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NEWS
March 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Revolt spread throughout most of southern Albania on Monday, but rebel leaders from one key city agreed after talks with Italian diplomats to lay down their arms. Representatives from the port city of Vlore said they wanted swift implementation of a peace deal between President Sali Berisha and his political opponents. The declaration by eight representatives of the Vlore rebel committee was signed on an Italian warship at a meeting with Italy's ambassador to Albania, Paolo Foresti.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the most prosperous region of his country in the hands of well-armed insurgents, Albanian President Sali Berisha agreed Sunday to form a new "government of national reconciliation" and hold fresh elections. Berisha's concession was greeted here in the heart of the rebellious south with a deafening unloading of celebratory machine-gun fire and grenade explosions. But the rebels said they will not end their mutiny until Berisha is out of office.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels angrily wave assault rifles and badger occupants of cars that navigate helter-skelter through the main boulevard of this southern city, past barricades of broken concrete and metal bars. Few women dare venture outside. Gunfire and explosions cut the air and reverberate over the Adriatic Sea.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
While rebelling southerners reinforced their combat positions, President Sali Berisha on Friday rejected international pressure and his opponents' demands for new elections. In talks with European envoys, Berisha also refused to bring his rivals, the Socialists, into a governing coalition. He said he has done all he is willing to do--temporarily suspend military offensives against the militants.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to pacify armed rebellion in the south, the Albanian government agreed Thursday to halt military operations there for 48 hours. In exchange, opposition politicians called on the insurgents to lay down their weapons and accept amnesty.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Sali Berisha, parts of his country in open revolt, deepened his own diplomatic isolation Wednesday by refusing the helping hand of Western mediators. Foreign Minister Tritan Shehu said the "timing" was wrong for an international peace mission, even as a military assault appeared imminent against Albanians in revolt in three southern cities.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tanks and troops streamed into southern Albania on Tuesday and took positions near the rebellious city of Vlore, where armed anti-government forces defied emergency rule and roamed streets they claimed as their own.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | From Reuters
Parliament handed President Sali Berisha special powers to restore order Sunday after demonstrators clashed with riot police in the capital and set scores of buildings ablaze in towns across the Balkan nation. Parliament, sitting for the first time on a Sunday since the ruling right-wing Democratic Party swept to power in a 1992 general election, voted at a crisis session to give Berisha the power to deploy troops to unblock roads and guard government buildings.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Angry Albanians who lost money in high-risk, get-rich-quick schemes seized control of this central town Saturday, beating a government minister and riot police before turning on reporters. Tritan Shehu, Albania's deputy prime minister and foreign minister, was hit in the back of the head with a stone and in the back with an iron bar. As night fell, the streets in this town 60 miles south of the capital, Tirana, belonged to the protesters.
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