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NEWS
January 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Yugoslav news agency Tanjug reported today that Albanian authorities have imposed "extremely strict" security measures in their isolated Communist country. Albanian TV, monitored in Belgrade, did not mention any special measures. Milisav Milic, a reporter for Belgrade TV from Yugoslavia's Kosovo province that borders Albania, said the "frequent sound of firearms" was heard today from the direction of Albania.
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NEWS
November 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Albania's Communist parliament passed an election law allowing secret ballots and a choice of candidates and ordered a sweeping revision of the constitution, the official ATA news agency said today. It said both issues were approved unanimously at a meeting of the People's Assembly in the capital, Tirana, on Tuesday. The decisions mark a further step on a cautious road to reform in Albania, Europe's last orthodox Communist state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1991 | Reuters
Albania said Friday it would recognize the former Soviet republics that now make up the Commonwealth of Independent States and would establish diplomatic relations with them. A statement from the foreign ministry in Tirana, published by the official ATA news agency, said Albania hailed the changes in the former Soviet Union as "progressive processes" and was convinced they would contribute to world peace and security.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | From Reuters
The Communist government of Albania on Friday announced a wide-ranging amnesty for prisoners to mark the 45th anniversary of its liberation during World War II. Albania's official ATA news agency, monitored in Belgrade, said the amnesty would become effective Monday. It did not disclose the number of people to be pardoned but said all prisoners sentenced for up to five years would benefit, except those jailed for "crimes against the state."
NEWS
August 6, 1986 | Associated Press
Albania, by choice one of the world's most isolated nations, today opened its first railway link with the rest of Europe--a cargo line--with no immediate plans for passenger service. Albanian and Yugoslav officials inaugurated the railroad by hoisting snifters of Albanian brandy in toasts to each other and to the parallel ribbons of steel at the border between their countries. Go-it-alone Marxist Albania broke with Yugoslavia in 1948, with Moscow in 1961 and Peking in 1978.
NEWS
January 5, 1986
Communist Albania, reasserting its political enmity toward both the United States and the Soviet Union, again ruled out diplomatic or other relations with the superpowers. "The foreign policy of socialist Albania will continue to be resolute, in the future, against all the aggressive and expansionist activity of the U.S.A. and the Soviet Union, against militarism and war preparations," said the Communist Party daily Zeri i Popullit.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | Associated Press
Greece established a cultural program Friday with neighboring Albania that will permit exchange visits by journalists, students, scientists, cultural groups and sports teams. Greeks will also be permitted to lecture at a teacher training college in Gjirokaster in southern Albania, home of an ethnic Greek minority thought to number more than 200,000, according to the two-year program.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | Reuters
Hard-line Communist Albania, in a dramatic foreign policy U-turn, said Wednesday that it wants to join the 35-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe. Albania is attending a CSCE meeting here as an observer for the first time.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Albania has agreed to establish diplomatic relations with the Philippines, the official Albanian news agency ATA said Saturday. The Albanian and Philippine governments "have decided to establish relations at ambassadorial level," ATA said in a brief announcement. Albania announced in May that it was establishing relations with Jordan. Only 17 nations have embassies in Albania.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS
Nick H. Christ still has vivid memories of the faces of despair he saw through the electrified barbed-wire fence that separates southern Epirus in Greece from northern Epirus in Albania. "It was truly a pathetic sight," said the 62-year-old Greek immigrant who lives in Tustin. "Seeing those people enslaved sent chills up my spine. Something has to be done to stop the human suffering that is happening there."
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