Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlbert Salmi
IN THE NEWS

Albert Salmi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Albert Salmi, who became established as an actor with a moving portrayal of Bo Decker in the 1955 Broadway production of "Bus Stop" and then worked regularly in Hollywood in TV series and films, was found shot to death in the same house with his estranged wife, police in Spokane, Wash., said Tuesday. Salmi apparently shot his wife and then killed himself, said police spokesman Lt. Robert Van Leuven. He was 62 and his wife, Roberta, was 55. A neighbor who had gone to check on Mrs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Albert Salmi, who became established as an actor with a moving portrayal of Bo Decker in the 1955 Broadway production of "Bus Stop" and then worked regularly in Hollywood in TV series and films, was found shot to death in the same house with his estranged wife, police in Spokane, Wash., said Tuesday. Salmi apparently shot his wife and then killed himself, said police spokesman Lt. Robert Van Leuven. He was 62 and his wife, Roberta, was 55. A neighbor who had gone to check on Mrs.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Veteran actor Albert Salmi, who found steady Hollywood work in television Westerns like "Gunsmoke," was found shot to death along with his wife, and police said today that it appeared to be a murder-suicide. Salmi, 62, apparently shot his 55-year-old estranged wife, Roberta G. Salmi, then killed himself, police spokesman Lt. Robert Van Leuven. A neighbor who had gone to check on Roberta Salmi on Monday night saw her body on the kitchen floor through a window and called police.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Veteran actor Albert Salmi, who found steady Hollywood work in television Westerns like "Gunsmoke," was found shot to death along with his wife, and police said today that it appeared to be a murder-suicide. Salmi, 62, apparently shot his 55-year-old estranged wife, Roberta G. Salmi, then killed himself, police spokesman Lt. Robert Van Leuven. A neighbor who had gone to check on Roberta Salmi on Monday night saw her body on the kitchen floor through a window and called police.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Born American" (citywide) isn't just a bad movie. It's one of those flabbergasting "No-they're-not-really-going-to-do- that!" movies, in which you can barely believe your eyes and ears. The movie is "Rambo" crossed with "Fraternity Vacation" and a bad cartoon version of "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich." It's an amazingly senseless movie, done with blood-curdling confidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The pairing of director Bill Forsyth and John Sayles, this time as a screenwriter, to create the delightful "Breaking In" (opening Friday at selected theaters) seems so felicitous you wonder that it didn't happen sooner. These are both men who know when to leave well-enough alone and when the smallest grace note will set a scene tingling.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | SUSAN KING
"Doo-doo-DO-DO-doo-doo-DO-DO." It's time to enter another dimension. It's time for KTLA's popular July 4 "Twilight Zone Marathon." Beginning Thursday at 9 a.m., fans of Rod Serling's landmark surreal series will be treated to 13 hours of "Twilight." KTLA airs "Twilight Zone" fests every Thanksgiving and Independence Day. "The first one we did was on Thanksgiving in 1980," said KTLA program director Mark Sonnenberg. "The July 4th marathon started in 1983.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Forty years ago, TV was in its infancy. It was fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants television. Shows were done live, complete with gaffes and goofs, and broadcast in grainy black-and-white. Yet some of the greatest dramatic shows were produced during the so-called Golden Age of Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Susan King
When the small screen was in its infancy in the 1950s, a group of young, scrappy writers such as Rod Serling, JP Miller, Reginald Rose and Paddy Chayefsky and directors such as John Frankenheimer, Alex Segal, Delbert Mann, Franklin Schaffner, Sidney Lumet and George Roy Hill collaborated on a series of live television dramas that set the gold standard for the fledgling medium. FOR THE RECORD: 'The Golden Age of Television': A DVD review in Saturday's Calendar on "The Golden Age of Television" misstated "A Wind From the South" director Daniel Petrie's first name as Donald, and misidentified the director of "Requiem for a Heavyweight," Ralph Nelson, as John Frankenheimer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Mark Harris, author of the acclaimed baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly," which he adapted for the 1973 movie starring Michael Moriarty and Robert De Niro, has died. He was 84. Harris, a retired Arizona State University professor of English who lived in Goleta, Calif., died of complications related to Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, said his son, Henry Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
From his condo in Northridge, where he spends endless hours hunched over an old editing machine he bought at a bankruptcy sale, Tony Zarindast puts the finishing touches on feature-length action, horror and adventure films that he then sells throughout the world. But the Iranian-born producer of such low-budget fare as "Death Flash" and "Hardcase and Fist" says the task of selling violent action movies abroad has never been more difficult.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|