Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlberto Fujimori
IN THE NEWS

Alberto Fujimori

NEWS
November 26, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was close to midnight in the cavernous presidential palace. Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori was talking about his leadership style. He chuckled dismissively about a poll ranking the power of his advisors. In reality, he said, his son Kenji had as much influence as a Cabinet minister on matters such as protecting an endangered crocodile in northern Peru or making peace with Ecuador. "He constantly comes to my office; he has that facility to enter my office," Fujimori said.
Advertisement
OPINION
November 26, 2000 | Michael Shifter, Michael Shifter is senior fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue and teaches Latin American politics at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service
In the end, Peru's notorious strongman was scared. During his decade-long presidency, Alberto Fujimori projected supreme confidence, bordering on invincibility. But mounting accusations of corruption and the rapid meltdown of his regime forced him to retreat to Japan, where he resigned with a whimper.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
A special investigator said Friday that he has asked the attorney general's office to launch a criminal investigation of former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori for possible corruption. Jose Ugaz--whom Fujimori appointed to investigate former spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos--said he filed the request Thursday with Atty. Gen. Nelly Calderon.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alberto Fujimori was elected president of Peru a decade ago, the Japanese public was elated. The foreign-born son of Japanese emigrants had made it big on the world stage. Surveys here ranked his election among the most exciting foreign news stories of 1990. Japanese camera crews dashed to Peru to satisfy the huge public demand for coverage. Reporters camped out at his ancestral village of Kawachi to interview his relatives, question shopkeepers and chat up local historians.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The raiders struck before dawn, 10 well-armed agents of the Peruvian intelligence service descending on a house here. The target was not a terrorists' hide-out. It was a secret "intelligence house" operated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration with approval of the Peruvian government. The military judge leading the raid threatened to arrest the U.S.-trained Peruvian police officers inside who were using high-tech equipment to intercept communications by drug traffickers.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alberto Fujimori formally resigned Peru's presidency in a letter sent from Japan on Monday, spreading anger and disbelief in his wake and paving the way for the opposition-led Congress to appoint his successor. On an emotional day filled with the echoes of a political strongman's precipitous fall, acting President Ricardo Marquez followed Fujimori's lead and stepped down as well.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and NATALIA TARNAWIECKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori announced from Japan on Sunday that he will resign within two days, bringing to a chaotic end his dramatic 10 years in power. In a brief written statement distributed by an aide in a Tokyo hotel where the president was taking refuge, Fujimori confirmed statements by officials in Lima, the Peruvian capital, that he will step down to speed the political transition of a nation mired in turmoil and scandal. "President Alberto Fujimori confirmed . . .
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Facing political turmoil at home, Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori plans to remain in Tokyo until Wednesday to negotiate loans to ease his nation's financial problems, the government newspaper El Peruano said. That explanation did little to help dispel rumors that the beleaguered president was in Asia seeking political asylum.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's opposition ousted President Alberto Fujimori's stalwart head of Congress from her post and released a new video showing the president's fugitive former spy chief calling the shots with the military. The video was released after Fujimori was criticized for abruptly leaving the escalating political chaos behind and flying to a trade summit in Brunei.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swiss authorities Friday froze about $50 million in Swiss bank accounts that they believe belong to Vladimiro Montesinos, Peru's fugitive ex-spy chief, and President Alberto Fujimori responded by promising to bring his former right-hand man to justice. The Peruvian president issued his first unabashed condemnation of Montesinos since ousting the all-powerful advisor and calling for early elections seven weeks ago amid a political crisis. "This money is surely illicit," Fujimori told reporters.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|