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Alberto Fujimori

NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Reuters
Peru's disgraced ex-president, Alberto Fujimori, said that dangers at home prevented his return but that he will keep his Peruvian nationality despite also holding Japanese citizenship, domestic media said today. It was the first time the strongman who governed Peru for a decade before going into exile last month in Japan had said he would retain his Peruvian nationality.
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NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Japan's government has determined that ousted Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori holds Japanese citizenship, an official said Monday, a development that could allow him to stay in the country as long as he wants. A government investigation found that Fujimori was born in Peru but registered by his parents at a local Japanese Consulate, making him a Japanese citizen, a Foreign Ministry official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Waging a political counterattack from exile in Japan, former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori said Friday that he believes his fugitive spy chief is alive and well in Peru and retains secret influence there. In an interview in a plush hotel suite, Fujimori responded to a barrage of political and legal attacks that followed his ouster by the Peruvian Congress last week.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Peru and elsewhere, the term "caretaker government" does not usually convey an image of strength. That's why all the applause in Lima was heartening last week, when interim Peruvian President Valentin Paniagua introduced a Cabinet to lead a period of democratic reconstruction during the next eight months. The loudest ovation greeted the new interior minister, Antonio Ketin Vidal, a retired police general who became a national hero when he hunted down a notorious terrorist leader in 1992.
OPINION
November 26, 2000 | Michael Shifter, Michael Shifter is senior fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue and teaches Latin American politics at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service
In the end, Peru's notorious strongman was scared. During his decade-long presidency, Alberto Fujimori projected supreme confidence, bordering on invincibility. But mounting accusations of corruption and the rapid meltdown of his regime forced him to retreat to Japan, where he resigned with a whimper.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was close to midnight in the cavernous presidential palace. Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori was talking about his leadership style. He chuckled dismissively about a poll ranking the power of his advisors. In reality, he said, his son Kenji had as much influence as a Cabinet minister on matters such as protecting an endangered crocodile in northern Peru or making peace with Ecuador. "He constantly comes to my office; he has that facility to enter my office," Fujimori said.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
A special investigator said Friday that he has asked the attorney general's office to launch a criminal investigation of former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori for possible corruption. Jose Ugaz--whom Fujimori appointed to investigate former spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos--said he filed the request Thursday with Atty. Gen. Nelly Calderon.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alberto Fujimori was elected president of Peru a decade ago, the Japanese public was elated. The foreign-born son of Japanese emigrants had made it big on the world stage. Surveys here ranked his election among the most exciting foreign news stories of 1990. Japanese camera crews dashed to Peru to satisfy the huge public demand for coverage. Reporters camped out at his ancestral village of Kawachi to interview his relatives, question shopkeepers and chat up local historians.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The raiders struck before dawn, 10 well-armed agents of the Peruvian intelligence service descending on a house here. The target was not a terrorists' hide-out. It was a secret "intelligence house" operated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration with approval of the Peruvian government. The military judge leading the raid threatened to arrest the U.S.-trained Peruvian police officers inside who were using high-tech equipment to intercept communications by drug traffickers.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alberto Fujimori formally resigned Peru's presidency in a letter sent from Japan on Monday, spreading anger and disbelief in his wake and paving the way for the opposition-led Congress to appoint his successor. On an emotional day filled with the echoes of a political strongman's precipitous fall, acting President Ricardo Marquez followed Fujimori's lead and stepped down as well.
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