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Alberto Fujimori

NEWS
November 21, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alberto Fujimori formally resigned Peru's presidency in a letter sent from Japan on Monday, spreading anger and disbelief in his wake and paving the way for the opposition-led Congress to appoint his successor. On an emotional day filled with the echoes of a political strongman's precipitous fall, acting President Ricardo Marquez followed Fujimori's lead and stepped down as well.
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NEWS
November 20, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and NATALIA TARNAWIECKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori announced from Japan on Sunday that he will resign within two days, bringing to a chaotic end his dramatic 10 years in power. In a brief written statement distributed by an aide in a Tokyo hotel where the president was taking refuge, Fujimori confirmed statements by officials in Lima, the Peruvian capital, that he will step down to speed the political transition of a nation mired in turmoil and scandal. "President Alberto Fujimori confirmed . . .
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Facing political turmoil at home, Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori plans to remain in Tokyo until Wednesday to negotiate loans to ease his nation's financial problems, the government newspaper El Peruano said. That explanation did little to help dispel rumors that the beleaguered president was in Asia seeking political asylum.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru's opposition ousted President Alberto Fujimori's stalwart head of Congress from her post and released a new video showing the president's fugitive former spy chief calling the shots with the military. The video was released after Fujimori was criticized for abruptly leaving the escalating political chaos behind and flying to a trade summit in Brunei.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swiss authorities Friday froze about $50 million in Swiss bank accounts that they believe belong to Vladimiro Montesinos, Peru's fugitive ex-spy chief, and President Alberto Fujimori responded by promising to bring his former right-hand man to justice. The Peruvian president issued his first unabashed condemnation of Montesinos since ousting the all-powerful advisor and calling for early elections seven weeks ago amid a political crisis. "This money is surely illicit," Fujimori told reporters.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, President Alberto Fujimori banished his wife, his brother, his longtime friends and even his spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos, until he had only a single ally left. In the weeks since the political crisis that led to Montesinos' firing, 23-year-old Keiko Fujimori--Peru's slightly chubby, sometimes shy first lady--has emerged as her father's spokeswoman and, from all appearances, closest confidant.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
The country's military said a mutiny of soldiers against President Alberto Fujimori was all but over Monday, even as the nation awaited fallout from the armed insurrection challenging the president's authority. The army said it rounded up more than 40 soldiers and civilians who were involved in the uprising in the remote southern Andes. The revolt, which reportedly involved 51 soldiers, demanded Fujimori's ouster and imprisonment of his former spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic show of force apparently intended to reassert control over a crisis-torn nation, Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori on Wednesday led an unsuccessful commando operation to hunt down his renegade former spy chief. As an army helicopter circled overhead, Fujimori led a caravan that zoomed into a hillside community outside Lima, the capital, about 5:45 p.m.
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to the uproar caused by his sudden return from exile, former spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos said in a rare public statement Tuesday that he intends to remain in Peru and wants to contribute to peace. His words had the opposite effect, however.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Damaso Toribio and Rosa Soto de Gomez will not be part of the parade of Peruvian dignitaries called to Washington this week to discuss the political and economic repercussions of the crisis engulfing the country. But the failed grocer turned shoe-shiner and the homemaker married to an independent contractor know quite a bit about the economic problems at the root of President Alberto Fujimori's unraveling regime. Five years ago, Toribio, Soto de Gomez and her husband all had steady work.
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