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October 6, 2006
Grammy-winners Mick Haggerty and Tommy Steele and fellow art director Tom Wilkes will talk about their careers and the art of designing album covers at an Oct. 19 panel discussion sponsored by the Los Angeles chapter of the Recording Academy. The event is open to the public, with tickets priced at $35 (discounts for students and academy members). It begins at 8 p.m. at the Recording Academy, 3402 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica. Information: (310) 581-8686.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2013 | By Michael Miller
The saying goes that necessity is the mother of invention, and for Vince Gerard it ended up being the mother of a new gallery in one of Southern California's artiest neighborhoods. The founder of Jazzartz got the idea for his project when he went shopping for fine-art prints of work by David Stone Martin, who designed more than 400 album covers for Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz and others. Gerard was unable to find any, though, so he began creating them himself - buying albums on eBay, contacting the artist's estate and making digital replicas of original works.
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NEWS
February 12, 1993
Reid Miles, 65, designer and photographer known for his Saturday Evening Post covers, Blue Note jazz record labels and covers, and "slice of life" advertisements for Chevrolet, Buick, Kawasaki and others. Raised in Long Beach and educated at Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles, Miles established his New York reputation by creating about 400 album covers for Blue Note. In 1971, he moved to Hollywood and set up Reid Miles Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013
Storm Thorgerson Creator of album art for Pink Floyd, Zeppelin Storm Thorgerson, 69, an English graphic designer whose eye-popping album art for Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin encapsulated the spirit of 1970s psychedelia, died Thursday. In a statement from London, his family gave few details but said that the artist, who suffered a stroke in 2003, had cancer. Thorgerson, whose art tended toward the unsettling or the bizarre, was best known for his surreal Pink Floyd covers, which guitarist David Gilmour said had long been "an inseparable part of our work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
Mati Klarwein, the surrealist painter who designed psychedelic album covers for rock bands and jazz musicians, including Santana, Miles Davis, and Earth, Wind and Fire, has died. He was 70. Klarwein died Wednesday night at his home in Deia, an artists' colony on the Spanish island of Majorca, officials of the municipality said Friday without giving the cause of death. Klarwein was born in Hamburg, Germany, and grew up in what became Israel, after his parents fled the Nazis in 1934.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Burt Goldblatt, 82, who designed album covers for jazz artists Billie Holliday, Herbie Mann, Charles Mingus and others, died Aug. 30 in Boston. The cause was congestive heart failure, his wife told the New York Times. Goldblatt used black-and-white photographs for his LP album covers, including studio shots and portraits that captured musicians in simple, unguarded moments. He also made line drawings of musicians and instruments that he used on his album covers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999
Bob Cato, 75, who helped turn record album covers into a contemporary art form and won two Grammy awards for his designs. Cato worked with such musicians as Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, Barbra Streisand and Leonard Bernstein in his role as art director for creative services at CBS-Columbia in the 1960s. He used the work of high-profile artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol on album covers. It was also Cato's idea to use the work of R.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Ever since puny CDs supplanted foot-square LPs in the marketplace, many fans and label art directors have lamented that the world of album art just isn't as much fun as it used to be, with creative cover design diminishing in proportion to the size of the product. Michael Ochs is doing something about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Influential English album cover designer Storm Thorgerson, whose album covers over a 45-year career included work for Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and dozens more, has died after a battle with cancer, his family has announced. The designer's work individually and with the design group Hipgnosis (which he co-founded) helped define the visuals of rock starting in the late 1960s, when album covers were the primary canvas of music and a catchy 12-by-12-inch image could reach an audience of millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Influential English album cover designer Storm Thorgerson, whose album covers over a 45-year career included work for Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and dozens more, has died after a battle with cancer, his family has announced. The designer's work individually and with the design group Hipgnosis (which he co-founded) helped define the visuals of rock starting in the late 1960s, when album covers were the primary canvas of music and a catchy 12-by-12-inch image could reach an audience of millions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Barry Feinstein, a photographer who gained renown as one of the premier chroniclers of the 1960s and '70s music scene, including shooting iconic album covers for Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin and George Harrison, has died. He was 80. Feinstein, a longtime resident of Woodstock, N.Y., who had been in failing health the last 10 years, died Thursday at a hospital in Kingston, N.Y., said his wife, Judith Jamison Feinstein. In an award-winning career that began in the 1950s and included shooting many of Hollywood's biggest stars, Feinstein had photos published in Life, Look, Time, Esquire, Newsweek and other magazines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Suze Rotolo, Bob Dylan's former girlfriend in Greenwich Village in the early 1960s, who appeared walking arm-in-arm with him on the iconic cover of his album "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan," has died. She was 67. Rotolo, who played a role in the young Dylan's evolution as a singer-songwriter and later had a career as an artist, died of cancer Friday at home in Greenwich Village, said her son, Luca Bartoccioli. FOR THE RECORD: Suze Rotolo: In the March 1 LATExtra section, a headline on the obituary for Suze Rotolo, Bob Dylan's former girlfriend in the early 1960s, said she died in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Liesl Bradner
You know you've reached a career pinnacle when an award is named after you. So it was only fitting that the Alex Award, created for excellence in entertainment package design, was named after Alex Steinweiss, the father of modern-day album covers. Although familiar with his work, Grammy Award-winning art director Kevin Reagan admits he knew little of the artist's life when asked to present a lifetime achievement award to him at the inaugural "Alex" award ceremony in 2003. The two soon became friends, and Reagan, fearful that a generation of iTunes listeners would never appreciate the man responsible for classical album designs, decided to pay homage to the artist with a career retrospective book, "Alex Steinweiss, the Inventor of the Modern Album Cover," an extensive collection of Steinweiss' artwork spanning six decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Tom Wilkes, a Grammy Award-winning art director and album cover designer whose work included albums for the Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin, Neil Young and other music legends, has died. He was 69. Wilkes, who was diagnosed with a form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) in 1999, died of a heart attack June 28 at his home in Pioneertown, Calif., said his daughter, Katherine Wilkes Fotch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
In the 1960s, a stiff-jointed, knee-high doll with brown hair and rosy cheeks named Little Marcy was promoted as a model toddler who sang simple Christian songs on dozens of record albums that sold for $1.98 each. The albums, which today can be found only in thrift store bins, featured on their covers photographs of Little Marcy and her world. "Marcy Goes to Nashville" shows her staring at a horse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013
Storm Thorgerson Creator of album art for Pink Floyd, Zeppelin Storm Thorgerson, 69, an English graphic designer whose eye-popping album art for Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin encapsulated the spirit of 1970s psychedelia, died Thursday. In a statement from London, his family gave few details but said that the artist, who suffered a stroke in 2003, had cancer. Thorgerson, whose art tended toward the unsettling or the bizarre, was best known for his surreal Pink Floyd covers, which guitarist David Gilmour said had long been "an inseparable part of our work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's nothing wrong with being up to your old tricks if your old tricks are good ones. Christian Marclay's--which involve album covers, records and recorded magnetic tape--are. But to keep us from getting too comfortable, he's thrown in some new ones, as well. It's a strategy the music industry knows well. There are, after all, only so many tunes, only so many ways to fool your fans into thinking they're getting something new.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Nelson is a Times staff writer.
Belgian pop artist Guy Peellaert, whose surreal pictures for the 1972 cult book "Rock Dreams" brought him worldwide attention and led him to design album covers for the Rolling Stones and David Bowie, has died. He was 74. Peellaert died Monday in Paris after a long illness, according to media reports. "Rock Dreams" was a fantasy tribute to rock 'n' roll that placed various major rock stars in dreamlike situations intended to reflect their music and public images.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- It was one of the most iconic record album covers ever released, and Suze Rotolo was part of it: On a snowy day in 1963, she snuggled with Bob Dylan as the two walked down a Greenwich Village street. "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan" went on to become one of his best-known records, but the long-haired girl on his arm was always a mystery.
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