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Alcoholic Beverage Control

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pancho & Wong's, the Redondo Beach bar where a bouncer fatally injured a patron two months ago, will not lose its liquor license but will face a suspension, an Alcoholic Beverage Control official said Thursday. Gilson Grey, administrator for the state Alcoholic Beverage Control Department's Inglewood district, would not say how long a suspension is recommended but noted that most suspensions range from a few days to "a couple of months."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has accused the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum of multiple violations of its conditional alcohol license during the Electric Daisy Carnival rave last year, including allowing teenagers to consume alcohol. The Coliseum also is accused of allowing consumption and sales of alcohol outside its licensed area, such as the parking lot, during the June 25-26 event. Penalties for a violation of an alcohol license can range from a letter of warning or a fine to suspension or revocation of a license.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials with the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control turned their undercover raid on a San Gabriel Valley bar late Friday into an unabashed media event staged to assail proposed cuts by Gov. Pete Wilson. Unless the proposed 75% reduction in ABC staffing is reversed, the agency's ability to conduct similar busts, investigate complaints and screen liquor license applicants would virtually end, officials warned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
More than 150 people were arrested Saturday on suspicion of buying alcohol for minors as part of a widespread sting in Southern California that authorities say was the largest in state history. The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, alongside several law enforcement agencies in 20 cities in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego and Santa Barbara counties, asked minors to stand outside liquor stores and ask adults to buy alcohol on their behalf. Those who agreed were cited, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators who enforce state liquor laws are preparing to resume regular patrols through the thousands of bars and stores in Orange County after being hobbled by state budget cuts in 1991, officials said recently. Alcoholic Beverage Control investigators in Orange County and elsewhere in the state were shifted from nearly all policing activities to licensing last March to handle an increasing backlog of applications for liquor licenses. But a state law that went into effect Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | DANNY SULLIVAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After deciding that two state laws apparently conflict, the California Highway Patrol is expected today to instruct officers not to arrest motorists who drink "nonalcoholic" beers while behind the wheel. As the beverages have become more popular, CHP officials have increasingly received inquiries about whether the drinks--which contain less than 0.5% alcohol--violate the state's open container law when consumed by people inside a moving vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
More than 150 people were arrested Saturday on suspicion of buying alcohol for minors as part of a widespread sting in Southern California that authorities say was the largest in state history. The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, alongside several law enforcement agencies in 20 cities in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego and Santa Barbara counties, asked minors to stand outside liquor stores and ask adults to buy alcohol on their behalf. Those who agreed were cited, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991
I am appalled by the planned cuts into one of the few state organizations that produce revenues for the state coffers: the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control ("State Plans to Lay Off 75% of Liquor Board Agents," front page, Oct. 3). Millions of dollars generated yearly by this fine agency are funneled into other, often money-losing projects. Trimming the one money-making department to support the losers is tantamount to shooting oneself in the leg in order to win a footrace!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1988
Herbert Piken, the developer of the shopping center at Coldwater Canyon and Ventura boulevards, attacked the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Assn. in a letter published on March 19. Residents who live next to the shopping center deserve protection. They deserve to be able to sleep at night and be able to park in their neighborhood. The state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has the legal ability to impose restrictions on liquor licenses. The residents have a right to utilize these regulations for their protection.
NEWS
April 23, 1987
To encourage a livelier night life in downtown Long Beach, the City Council agreed this week to make it easier for businesses to move into the city's redevelopment area by exempting them from applying for a city alcohol-related permit. Businesses affected are those that include the sale of alcoholic beverages--such as restaurants--which move into the downtown area zoned as central business, located south of 7th Street between Pacific and Linden avenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Corona case that could affect topless bars throughout California, a state appeals board has ruled that a Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control regulation restricting topless dancing infringes on the dancers' constitutional rights. The decision could make it more difficult for the department to suspend or revoke licenses of topless bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State authorities Thursday ordered the liquor store owner who sold alcohol to a group of Anaheim teens--four of whom subsequently died in a drunk driving accident near Victorville--to relinquish his business. The Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control gave owner Masood M. Zaman six months to transfer his license to a person who meets department approval and is not a relative. In addition, Zaman, who owns Me-N-Paul's, cannot sell liquor for 30 days. "We felt all along Mr. Zaman was a person we did not want to see continue as a licensee," said Carl Falletta, assistant director of the department's southern bureau.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Democrats controlled the Assembly, the wine, beer and liquor industry routinely killed efforts to prohibit corner grocery stores from selling high-alcohol "wine" and malt liquors. This year, Assemblyman Bruce Thompson (R-Fallbrook), who is part of the GOP's leadership and has taken up the cause, proclaimed that no bill was more important to him than his legislation to halt fortified wine and malt liquor sales in groceries, limiting them to stores with liquor licenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1994 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man posing as an agent with the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control swindled two San Fernando Valley restaurant owners out of more than $7,500 for phony liquor licenses, authorities said Friday. State police are continuing to search for the man and any additional victims, said Carl DeWing, an ABC spokesman. DeWing said the man approached his first victim on Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators who enforce state liquor laws are preparing to resume regular patrols through the thousands of bars and stores in Orange County after being hobbled by state budget cuts in 1991, officials said recently. Alcoholic Beverage Control investigators in Orange County and elsewhere in the state were shifted from nearly all policing activities to licensing last March to handle an increasing backlog of applications for liquor licenses. But a state law that went into effect Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State alcohol agents will once again be working undercover to enforce liquor laws at stores and bars throughout the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys because of a law effective Jan. 1 that restores funding for the work. "We're finally able to get back into the business we're supposed to be in," said Jim Smith, district administrator for the state Alcohol Beverage Control Department in the Van Nuys office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1985
Your companion articles (Editorial Pages, June 9), "The 'Crime' of Public Drunkenness: a Case for California's Highest Court," and "A Memory of 'Murmur Booze': How Drinking Dulls the Soviets," suggest that rot-gut wine dulls more than wino brains, notwithstanding that public inebriates only comprise about 5% of California's problem drinkers. If the California Supreme Court finally decides to join foursquarely the 35 other states that have decriminalized public drunkenness, the Legislature and the governor may finally be pressured to enact a permanent and stable funding base (such as significantly increasing booze taxes)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has accused the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum of multiple violations of its conditional alcohol license during the Electric Daisy Carnival rave last year, including allowing teenagers to consume alcohol. The Coliseum also is accused of allowing consumption and sales of alcohol outside its licensed area, such as the parking lot, during the June 25-26 event. Penalties for a violation of an alcohol license can range from a letter of warning or a fine to suspension or revocation of a license.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | DANNY SULLIVAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After deciding that two state laws apparently conflict, the California Highway Patrol is expected today to instruct officers not to arrest motorists who drink "nonalcoholic" beers while behind the wheel. As the beverages have become more popular, CHP officials have increasingly received inquiries about whether the drinks--which contain less than 0.5% alcohol--violate the state's open container law when consumed by people inside a moving vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials with the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control turned their undercover raid on a San Gabriel Valley bar late Friday into an unabashed media event staged to assail proposed cuts by Gov. Pete Wilson. Unless the proposed 75% reduction in ABC staffing is reversed, the agency's ability to conduct similar busts, investigate complaints and screen liquor license applicants would virtually end, officials warned.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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