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NEWS
May 14, 1990 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Truckers rolling through on Interstate 40 refer to this city of 20,000 on their CBs as "Drunk City, U.S.A." The label reflects Gallup's long-established reputation as a place where people--most of them from the nearby Navajo reservation--come to get drunk. Along Route 66 and its assortment of bars and package outlets, drunks slump against buildings a block from the Santa Fe train yard, where passenger trains bound for Los Angeles and Chicago stop each day.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Mary McNamara
Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer. Two years ago, when CBS premiered the crime-procedural "Elementary," the decision to make Sherlock Holmes (played by Jonny Lee Miller) a modern-day recovering addict seemed equally canny and risky. Holmes is indeed literature's most famous and enduring druggie - in Nicholas Meyer's "Seven-Percent Solution" none other than Sigmund Freud helped him kick the coke habit.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
An Encinitas man who claimed he was plied with drinks while he gambled away more than $1 million has reached an undisclosed settlement with two Las Vegas casinos. Stephen Roel, 54, filed a federal lawsuit in January, accusing the Las Vegas Hilton and the Mandalay Bay Resort of capitalizing on his alcoholism last fall by serving him alcohol while he was drunk and loaning him money to wager.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The maker of Four Loko, the malt liquor beverage that once was made with caffeine, on Tuesday agreed to sharply curb its marketing of the fruit-flavored drinks as part of a legal settlement with 20 state attorneys general and San Francisco City Atty. Dennis Herrera.  The settlement comes nearly four years after Phusion Projects, based in Chicago, voluntarily removed caffeine from its drinks in 2010 shortly before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration definitively banned the stimulant as an ingredient in alcoholic beverages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989
I find it rather amusing--as a recovering alcoholic myself--that people are all in a tizzy over Joseph Hazelwood being in command of the Exxon Valdez when he had a history of alcoholism, yet John Tower was approved by all the Republican members of the Senate committee. A person with a history of drinking problems can run the whole Defense Department yet President Bush lets no photo op go by to rail against a more trendy "cause," the drug problem in the United States. If half the attention paid to the drug problem was paid to the problem of alcoholism in this country, we might cut down on the tragedies that result from the abuse of alcohol.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Alcoholism and other substance-use disorders appear strongly linked to a particular gene mutation, researchers reported Tuesday. Substance-use disorders are thought to arise from a combination of environmental or lifestyle factors and genetic characteristics. Identifying certain genes that are known to predispose people to the disease could be helpful in preventing drug addiction. Researchers have been working to identify some of the prominent gene mutations that could serve as markers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1985
If alcoholism is not a disease, will Vatz and Weinberg tell me what killed my old drinking buddies? JOE ST. AMANT Los Angeles
NEWS
April 3, 1988
I really believe Fingarette's statement that he has done "no experimental or clinical research on alcoholism . . . and is in no way committed in the field," which currently includes such institutions as the Harvard, Yale, Stanford and Cornell medical schools. His observation that "almost everything the American public believes to be the scientific truth about alcoholism is false" makes him an intellectual candidate for "Wheel of Fortune." His question, "Why should my opinion count?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1985
First I had to shout agreement with Richard Vatz and Lee Weinberg for their article (Editorial Pages, Aug. 11) debunking the popular myth that alcoholism is a disease. Then I had to laugh at the rebuttal letters (Aug. 30), which sought, but so ineffectively, to attack Vatz and Weinberg's position. Alcoholism may indeed be a chemical dependency. And it certainly has identifiable physical effects on the body. But it is not a disease. To me, a disease is something you catch, either by accident or unknowingly as a byproduct of a normal, innocent activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Government scientists have developed a blood test to diagnose alcoholism that may also offer a way to screen people for an inherited risk of becoming an alcoholic. The test, which measures two enzymes in the blood, could also help researchers understand what makes some people prone to becoming dependent on alcohol and possibly lead to improved treatment, researchers said.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Starbucks Corp. will extend its post-4 p.m. Evenings menu, which includes alcohol, to thousands of stores nationwide. The program is already available at more than 25 locations in Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, Portland and Atlanta, according to the company's website. At the four participating Southland Starbucks, the Evenings selection includes Parmesan-crusted chicken skewers with honey-dijon sauce, chocolate fondue with a dried fruit medley and madeleine cookies, beer and wine from Argentina, Italy and California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Gale Holland
In a victory for skid row advocates, the city has rejected beer and wine sales at a restaurant on the ground floor of an apartment complex that houses recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. The Skid Row Housing Trust, which runs the 106-unit New Genesis Apartments at 5th and Main streets, had argued the permit was crucial to the financial health of the complex. The apartments are rented to artists and low-income people as well as the homeless, who receive counseling and substance abuse treatment on the site.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
GOLDEN, Colo. - The instructions seemed simple enough: nine steps forward, heel to toe, a quick turnaround, then nine steps back. But for the guy swaying a bit as he walked, his face slack, his eyes half closed, it was all too much. He made the nine steps forward and stopped, forgetting what came next. "Wait. What?" Colorado State Trooper Jason Morales dutifully marked it down in his report, just as he had a few minutes earlier when the suspect closed his eyes and tilted his head back to guess the passage of 30 seconds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Susan King
Kathie Lee Gifford looked like a deer caught in oncoming headlights when 89-year-old Broadway legend Elaine Stritch casually dropped an F-bomb on the "Today" show a few weeks back. Gifford shouldn't have been surprised. Stritch, who appeared on the morning show to chat about the documentary "Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me," which opens in L.A. on Friday, has been a lively and outspoken force of nature throughout a career that has spanned more than 60 years. And she was equally unfiltered in a recent phone conversation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Public health officials Wednesday called a new survey that found 70% of stores in Los Angeles County market tobacco, alcohol and junk food to consumers troubling, especially given that many neighborhoods lack alternatives to make healthier choices. Meanwhile, just 12% of stores have exterior advertising for healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, researchers found. The statewide survey looked at the availability and marketing of tobacco products, alcohol and food in retail environments of more than 7,300 California stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Excessive speed and the winding road may be factors in the fatal crash involving Salma Hayek's brother, Los Angeles police said. Sami Hayek was driving a Ford GT supercar in Beverly Crest on Sunday afternoon when he lost control on a curvy stretch of Sunset Boulevard near Mapleton Drive and crossed into the street's westbound lanes. His passenger, Ian Cuttler Sala, died in the crash.  Los Angeles police Lt. Andrew Neiman said traffic investigators found that no alcohol or drugs were involved, but Hayek may have been going too fast and lost control of the high-powered vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Party hosts who ask guests to pay a cover charge to defray costs may be held legally responsible if an underage drinker becomes intoxicated and hurts himself or others, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. In a unanimous ruling, the high court said a cover charge amounts to a sale of alcohol, and state law creates liability for those who sell alcohol to obviously intoxicated minors. The decision, which overturned two lower court rulings, is most likely to affect student parties, where underage drinking and cover charges are common.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Jessica Manosa was 20 when she decided to throw a party at an unoccupied rental home her parents owned - without their permission. Word of the bash in Diamond Bar spread by text message, and many who showed up did not even know Manosa, according to court records. They drank liquor, danced and got drunk. One of the partygoers was asked to leave after he began dropping his pants while dancing. As he drove away, he ran over another inebriated guest, a 19-year-old student, killing him. Now the grieving family wants to hold Manosa - via her parents and their homeowners insurance - liable for his death.
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