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Alcon Entertainment

January 14, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In the live-action talking animal genre, "Racing Stripes" is no "Babe" but should delight youngsters, although parents likely will find it is sentimental in the extreme, with a plot that telegraphs every development. Efficiently directed, however, by Frederik Du Chau from David F. Schmidt's script, the film is populated with endearing animals that are expertly anthropomorphized and that are voiced by, among others, a sprinkling of famous names, including Dustin Hoffman, no less.
July 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- “Transcendence,” the upcoming Johnny Depp sci-fi film directed by Christopher Nolan's longtime cinematographer Wally Pfister, will get a boost in China from DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that helped add Chinese elements to “Iron Man 3” and “Looper.” But don't look for any extra China-specific footage in the 2014 film. DMG said Thursday it had partnered with Alcon Entertainment to help finance, produce and distribute the movie in China, which is now filming stateside and will be released in the U.S. by Warner Bros.
December 12, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Love Don't Cost a Thing" finds earnest high school senior Alvin Johnson (Nick Cannon) on his pool-cleaning job when he locks eyes with beautiful Paris Morgan (Christina Milian), the most popular girl in school, during a party at her upscale home. It's not just a matter of natural attraction on Alvin's part but that Paris represents everything Alvin lacks and longs for.
February 18, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
"I do suck fat. I will suck the fat off my steak," actress Alice Englert warns as she slides into a booth at Musso & Frank in Hollywood on a dreary, overcast day. "I just want to prepare you in advance that I'm known to be disgusting when I eat steak. " Alden Ehrenreich, her costar in the new film "Beautiful Creatures," is unfazed by her eagerness. Perhaps it's because after enduring a shoot involving sweltering, 90-degree Louisiana days, food poisoning and Southern accents, the two on-screen sweethearts have an easy familiarity.
August 11, 2011
Alan Ball has one of the most popular shows on cable with HBO's "True Blood. " Now he could be a double threat via HBO's sister network. The creator will executive produce a new series called "Banshee," which will serve as a key plank in Cinemax's original programming push. The series will be set in a small town in Pennsylvania Amish country (the titular Banshee), according to a person who was briefed on the project but asked not to be identified, and will feature an enigmatic ex-con who's also an expert in martial arts.
December 13, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
As founder, chairman and chief executive of National Research Group Inc. from 1978 to 2003, movie market researcher Joseph Farrell introduced the concept of market testing to Hollywood, originating now-standard industry practices such as audience tracking surveys, focus-group preview screenings and demographic analysis of moviegoers. Over the decades, NRG's confidential research reports were used by all of the major Hollywood studios to make decisions about release dates, tweak marketing campaigns and — sometimes to the unease of filmmakers — tinker with movies.
Bodily secretions and abused pooches aside, the most startling quality of "There's Something About Mary" was the way it married the romantic comedy genre to the teen gross-out movie. All of that raunchy stuff that had audiences either squirming or rolling in the aisles might've shook up the folks who flock to Meg Ryan movies, but it has long been the bread and butter of a certain kind of flick that caters to, shall we say, less delicate tastes.
Based on Willie Morris' 1995 memoir, "My Dog Skip" is a standard-issue Hollywood family film about a boy and his dog growing up in a Southern small town during World War II. As such, it fills the bill without transcending it. It's a little too glossy, Skip a bit too much the trained performer--he's played by two perfectly matched Jack Russell terriers--and William Ross' omnipresent score far too syrupy and trite.
Every now and then, palace intrigue can be fun, and there can be no more glorious setting for schemers and adventurers than Versailles, home of France's absolute monarchs, the increasingly profligate Bourbons, toppled at last in 1793 by the French Revolution. With the elegant "The Affair of the Necklace," director Charles Shyer and writer John Sweet take us into this vanished world with aplomb and allow us to discover that in many ways, nothing much has changed.
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