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Alejandro Jodorowsky

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March 30, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-born maestro of wretched excess, is back at it after a 10-year absence. "Santa Sangre" (at the Nuart) is a grisly, grotesque cross between "Psycho" and the Tod Browning-Lon Chaney "The Unknown" served up with the writer-director's usual mishmash of religious and Freudian symbolism topped with Fellini flourishes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Jon Favreau's restaurant comedy “Chef,” Rob Thomas' crowd-funded “Veronica Mars” movie and a documentary about zombies in film and popular culture will premiere at the 21st edition of the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival in Austin, Texas, organizers announced Thursday. The festival, which runs March 7-15, also will host an event with prominent physicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who will discuss his new Fox series “Cosmos,” as well as an hourlong conversation with surrealist filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
More than a year after his "Battleship" was torpedoed at the box office, filmmaker Pete Berg is set to unveil his new movie in the heart of Hollywood. "Lone Survivor," the director's Navy SEAL drama, will have its red carpet debut at AFI Fest, the eight-day-long film gathering that kicks off Nov. 7. Berg's film, which Universal Pictures will open in limited release in late December before its nationwide launch two weeks later, is one of three additional gala screenings announced by festival programmers on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
More than a year after his "Battleship" was torpedoed at the box office, filmmaker Pete Berg is set to unveil his new movie in the heart of Hollywood. "Lone Survivor," the director's Navy SEAL drama, will have its red carpet debut at AFI Fest, the eight-day-long film gathering that kicks off Nov. 7. Berg's film, which Universal Pictures will open in limited release in late December before its nationwide launch two weeks later, is one of three additional gala screenings announced by festival programmers on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Jon Favreau's restaurant comedy “Chef,” Rob Thomas' crowd-funded “Veronica Mars” movie and a documentary about zombies in film and popular culture will premiere at the 21st edition of the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival in Austin, Texas, organizers announced Thursday. The festival, which runs March 7-15, also will host an event with prominent physicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who will discuss his new Fox series “Cosmos,” as well as an hourlong conversation with surrealist filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Nothing can be more terrifying, or exhilarating, than absolute candor. And Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-Mexican-Parisian director who made the '70s cult hits "El Topo" and "The Holy Mountain" is nothing if not candid. When describing the generation of the eerie imagery in these movies, and in his latest, "Santa Sangre," he explains: "Everything came from me. I am a very weird person." "Santa Sangre" is a very weird movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Mark Olsen and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
El Monte high school teacher Trevor Schoenfeld is an omnivorous moviegoer, the kind who wants to see films he's interested in at their first possible screening. For years, he's been willing to line up at the multiplex for the first midnight showings of mainstream releases, but lately, he's gone to theaters playing "Evil Dead," "Oblivion" and "Pain & Gain" at 10 p.m. or even 7 p.m. Thursday ahead of their official Friday openings - sometimes getting home to his four kids before the clock strikes 12. "It is much nicer to get home at midnight versus getting home at 3 a.m.," said Schoenfeld.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES - The movie with the Nazi martial-arts fight and drag queens dressed as clowns had just ended when Nicolas Winding Refn, giddy with excitement, or as giddy as droll Danes get, leaned forward in his seat and initiated a rousing round of applause. The director he was cheering, the auteur-of-the-absurd Alejandro Jodorowsky, was sitting in front of Refn at the Cannes premiere of Jodorowsky's new film, titled “La Danza de la Realidad.” Refn soon bounded to his feet, hugged the octogenarian and kept the clapping going for nearly 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alejandro Jodorowsky has made only half a dozen features since the 1960s (two of which he has apparently disowned), but he is a towering figure in the annals of cult cinema, the man behind the first ? and still the ultimate ? counterculture midnight movie. Jodorowsky's cosmic western "El Topo," which he wrote, directed, scored and acted in, played for months in 1971 to downtown Manhattan crowds that gathered ritualistically for a kind of stoned midnight communion. The filmmaker has contended that "head" movies are more than movies to take drugs to ?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
As the first of a trio of his movies the Nuart is presenting over the next several days, Alejandro Jodorowsky's "El Topo" seems just as pretentious and shallow as it did more than 35 years ago, but, then as now, it is understandable why it caught on as a cult film, helping launch the enduring popularity of the midnight-movie circuit. The theater is promoting the 1971 film as "the most talked-about, most shocking, most controversial quasi-Western head trip ever made."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES - The movie with the Nazi martial-arts fight and drag queens dressed as clowns had just ended when Nicolas Winding Refn, giddy with excitement, or as giddy as droll Danes get, leaned forward in his seat and initiated a rousing round of applause. The director he was cheering, the auteur-of-the-absurd Alejandro Jodorowsky, was sitting in front of Refn at the Cannes premiere of Jodorowsky's new film, titled “La Danza de la Realidad.” Refn soon bounded to his feet, hugged the octogenarian and kept the clapping going for nearly 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
CANNES, France - The Chilean director Alejandro Jodorowsky has made only seven features in his nearly half-century career, but his legendary midnight movie "El Topo," a wigged-out peyote western that played to New York audiences for months in 1970, sealed his place in the annals of cult cinema. Jodorowsky last made a comeback in 1989 with the Oedipal melodrama "Santa Sangre," about a serial killer operating under the spell of his armless mother. When that project was announced at the Cannes Film Festival, a journalist wondered if a decade-long break from filmmaking had left Jodorowsky rusty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Mark Olsen and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
El Monte high school teacher Trevor Schoenfeld is an omnivorous moviegoer, the kind who wants to see films he's interested in at their first possible screening. For years, he's been willing to line up at the multiplex for the first midnight showings of mainstream releases, but lately, he's gone to theaters playing "Evil Dead," "Oblivion" and "Pain & Gain" at 10 p.m. or even 7 p.m. Thursday ahead of their official Friday openings - sometimes getting home to his four kids before the clock strikes 12. "It is much nicer to get home at midnight versus getting home at 3 a.m.," said Schoenfeld.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alejandro Jodorowsky has made only half a dozen features since the 1960s (two of which he has apparently disowned), but he is a towering figure in the annals of cult cinema, the man behind the first ? and still the ultimate ? counterculture midnight movie. Jodorowsky's cosmic western "El Topo," which he wrote, directed, scored and acted in, played for months in 1971 to downtown Manhattan crowds that gathered ritualistically for a kind of stoned midnight communion. The filmmaker has contended that "head" movies are more than movies to take drugs to ?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
As the first of a trio of his movies the Nuart is presenting over the next several days, Alejandro Jodorowsky's "El Topo" seems just as pretentious and shallow as it did more than 35 years ago, but, then as now, it is understandable why it caught on as a cult film, helping launch the enduring popularity of the midnight-movie circuit. The theater is promoting the 1971 film as "the most talked-about, most shocking, most controversial quasi-Western head trip ever made."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-born maestro of wretched excess, is back at it after a 10-year absence. "Santa Sangre" (opening at the Ken tonight) is a grisly, grotesque cross between "Psycho" and the Tod Browning-Lon Chaney "The Unknown" served up with the writer-director's usual mishmash of religious and Freudian symbolism topped with Fellini flourishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
CANNES, France - The Chilean director Alejandro Jodorowsky has made only seven features in his nearly half-century career, but his legendary midnight movie "El Topo," a wigged-out peyote western that played to New York audiences for months in 1970, sealed his place in the annals of cult cinema. Jodorowsky last made a comeback in 1989 with the Oedipal melodrama "Santa Sangre," about a serial killer operating under the spell of his armless mother. When that project was announced at the Cannes Film Festival, a journalist wondered if a decade-long break from filmmaking had left Jodorowsky rusty.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Nothing can be more terrifying, or exhilarating, than absolute candor. And Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-Mexican-Parisian director who made the '70s cult hits "El Topo" and "The Holy Mountain" is nothing if not candid. When describing the generation of the eerie imagery in these movies, and in his latest, "Santa Sangre," he explains: "Everything came from me. I am a very weird person." "Santa Sangre" is a very weird movie.
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