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Aleksandras Lileikis

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NEWS
September 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The trial of Lithuanian war crimes suspect Aleksandras Lileikis was postponed to today after he failed to show up. Lileikis, 91, is accused of turning over Lithuanian Jews to the Nazis while he was head of the secret police in Vilnius, the capital, during World War II. He has been hospitalized since last week, his lawyers said. Lileikis returned to Lithuania in 1995 as the U.S. moved to revoke his citizenship, but he was not charged until this year.
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NEWS
September 28, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's most famous Nazi war crimes suspect, Aleksandras Lileikis, who for years frustrated efforts by international Jewish groups to bring him to justice, has died in his homeland. He was 93. Lileikis, whose trial was suspended repeatedly because of his poor health, was rushed to a hospital after a heart attack, his lawyer, Algirdas Matuiza, told the Baltic News Service.
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NEWS
September 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A court postponed indefinitely the genocide trial of a former Lithuanian security chief whose lawyers say is too ill to attend the proceedings. The court said it will appoint a medical commission to determine if 91-year-old Aleksandras Lileikis is too sick to speak in his own defense. Some Jewish groups contend that Lithuanian authorities are trying to drag out the procedures until Lileikis dies.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
A judge suspended indefinitely the trial of an alleged Nazi war criminal Monday, saying the accused is too sick to appear in court. The judge said a doctors' report showed that Aleksandras Lileikis, 91, is suffering from serious coronary disease and will be unable to leave the hospital for several weeks. Lileikis appeared briefly in court Thursday in a wheelchair but was rushed away in an ambulance after complaining of shortness of breath.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
A judge suspended indefinitely the trial of an alleged Nazi war criminal Monday, saying the accused is too sick to appear in court. The judge said a doctors' report showed that Aleksandras Lileikis, 91, is suffering from serious coronary disease and will be unable to leave the hospital for several weeks. Lileikis appeared briefly in court Thursday in a wheelchair but was rushed away in an ambulance after complaining of shortness of breath.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's most famous Nazi war crimes suspect, Aleksandras Lileikis, who for years frustrated efforts by international Jewish groups to bring him to justice, has died in his homeland. He was 93. Lileikis, whose trial was suspended repeatedly because of his poor health, was rushed to a hospital after a heart attack, his lawyer, Algirdas Matuiza, told the Baltic News Service.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | Reuters
A federal judge Friday stripped accused Nazi collaborator Aleksandras Lileikis of his U.S. citizenship. The action by U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns means the government can begin deportation proceedings against Lileikis, 88, described as the secret police chief in Nazi-controlled Vilnius, Lithuania, from 1941 to 1944.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
A court-appointed medical panel said Friday that a man accused of turning Jews over to a Nazi execution squad in Lithuania is too ill to stand trial on charges of genocide. The panel was appointed after 91-year-old Kazys Gimzauskas failed to attend the opening of his trial this month. The court is not bound to accept the panel's assessment, and it was unclear when a final ruling would be made. Lithuania does not allow trials in absentia when defendants are ill.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
The first Nazi war crimes trial in Lithuania ended before it began Friday when judges postponed the proceedings indefinitely because of the defendant's ill health. Judges said that Aleksandras Lileikis, 92, was too ill to stand trial and that the case can resume only after his health improves. Lawyers say there is virtually no chance that judges will restart the trial given Lileikis' age and condition.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | Times staff and wire reports
Nearly two years after losing his U.S. citizenship, Kazys Gimzauskas was indicted Friday for his alleged role in the murder of Lithuanian Jews during World War II. The indictment came just days before the start of the trial of Aleksandras Lileikis, the first person to be prosecuted for Nazi war crimes in any of the successor states of the former Soviet Union. Gimzauskas, 89, was a deputy to Lileikis, who was chief of security police in Vilnius, the Lithuanian capital, during the Nazi occupation.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A court postponed indefinitely the genocide trial of a former Lithuanian security chief whose lawyers say is too ill to attend the proceedings. The court said it will appoint a medical commission to determine if 91-year-old Aleksandras Lileikis is too sick to speak in his own defense. Some Jewish groups contend that Lithuanian authorities are trying to drag out the procedures until Lileikis dies.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The trial of Lithuanian war crimes suspect Aleksandras Lileikis was postponed to today after he failed to show up. Lileikis, 91, is accused of turning over Lithuanian Jews to the Nazis while he was head of the secret police in Vilnius, the capital, during World War II. He has been hospitalized since last week, his lawyers said. Lileikis returned to Lithuania in 1995 as the U.S. moved to revoke his citizenship, but he was not charged until this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998
A shadow covers Lithuania. It was there a half-century ago and remains today, darkening the prospect that the Baltic nation will soon win acceptance in the European family. Since the horrid events of World War II and postwar Soviet rule, Lithuania's society and government have largely dissembled the existence of rabid anti-Semitism and killing grounds on their soil. And many of those responsible still stand in the shadow.
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