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Alexander Calder

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NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
I've been sorting my bookshelves and turned up this gem the other day: “Calder at Home” with photographs and text by Pedro E. Guerrero (Stewart, Tabori & Chang). That would be Alexander “Sandy” Calder, the American artist who is best known for his kinetic steel sculptures. As an impoverished artist in Paris in the 1920s, he designed toys, made wire portraits and, famously, created a traveling toy circus that he stashed in a series of suitcases. He was also handy around the house and, according to Guerrero, liked to make kitchen utensils whenever his wife Louisa needed something.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Dressed in corduroy pants, slip-on black shoes and a windbreaker, Frank Gehry strolled through a tiny universe of thread and painted metal mobiles. Light, curves and shadows; all clutter stripped away. The shapes floated in silence and the architect, who knows something of graceful sketches and clean designs, smiled, as if in the artist's vision he had found a kindred whisper. "He kind of worked intuitively," Gehry, 84, who possesses the air of a small-town hardware salesman, said of Alexander Calder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David Pagel
Just about everyone loves Alexander Calder (1898-1976). Casual observers enjoy the playful weightlessness of his mobiles, a genre of sculpture he may not have invented but owns so completely that it's almost impossible for another artist to make a mobile and not be compared, unfavorably, to Calder. Art specialists, who usually pooh-pooh such popular sentiments, also admire the elegant economy of Calder's streamlined forms and his graceful spatial arrangements. At L&M Arts, a fantastic two-gallery exhibition (and a large, outdoor sculpture)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
If you like Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, you'll love the sculpture of Alexander Calder. And vice versa. As an artist Calder certainly wasn't in the business of illustrating difficult scientific postulates. (Born on the cusp of the 20th century, he died at 78 in 1976.) In fact, one frequent knock on him was the claim that, while charmingly whimsical, his sculpture is physically, emotionally and intellectually lightweight. After all, this is the guy who built an entire miniature circus out of cardboard, some buttons and a bunch of twisted wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Dressed in corduroy pants, slip-on black shoes and a windbreaker, Frank Gehry strolled through a tiny universe of thread and painted metal mobiles. Light, curves and shadows; all clutter stripped away. The shapes floated in silence and the architect, who knows something of graceful sketches and clean designs, smiled, as if in the artist's vision he had found a kindred whisper. "He kind of worked intuitively," Gehry, 84, who possesses the air of a small-town hardware salesman, said of Alexander Calder.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | BEN ELDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sunday "L.A. Lifeguards" / 6 p.m. TBS "Baywatch" star Mike Newman narrates this look at the real-life inspiration for the long-running series. Among L.A. County's elite corps of 600 seasonal lifeguards are eager rookies and 32-year veteran Mel Solberg, as well as husband-and-wife lifeguards and lifeguards with second jobs: an ER physician, a history teacher and a performance artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2006 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
Too much often is made of biography in attempts to pinpoint origins of an artist's work, but in the case of Alexander Calder, known for his mobiles, "stabiles" and kinetic works made of wire, sheet metal and other materials, tracing biography feels like watching destiny unfold.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In terms of legacy, Calder is the Hemingway of the art world. His work is so popular, accessible and deceptively easy that the most au courant scholars tend to pass it over, and other artists don't always own up to its influence. "It's almost like Calder is invisible because he's so ubiquitous," says L.A.-based artist Jason Meadows, who used to walk by one of his massive public sculptures as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. "When I was getting educated into the world of fine art, Abstract Expressionist painters were really hot and I got really charmed by Pop Art. Calder wasn't someone you would think about.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
If you like Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, you'll love the sculpture of Alexander Calder. And vice versa. As an artist Calder certainly wasn't in the business of illustrating difficult scientific postulates. (Born on the cusp of the 20th century, he died at 78 in 1976.) In fact, one frequent knock on him was the claim that, while charmingly whimsical, his sculpture is physically, emotionally and intellectually lightweight. After all, this is the guy who built an entire miniature circus out of cardboard, some buttons and a bunch of twisted wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
An Alexander Calder mobile with a $1.4-million price tag has been stolen from a Manhattan gallery, authorities said today. The 30-pound mobile, "White Flag," was stolen at 6 p.m. Sunday from Perls Galleries on the Upper East Side, police said. The gallery owner, Klaus Perls, discovered the burglary Monday morning. Perls, 78, was Calder's exclusive agent for 22 years, until the artist died in 1976. Police said the burglars entered the six-story building through a skylight.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
I've been sorting my bookshelves and turned up this gem the other day: “Calder at Home” with photographs and text by Pedro E. Guerrero (Stewart, Tabori & Chang). That would be Alexander “Sandy” Calder, the American artist who is best known for his kinetic steel sculptures. As an impoverished artist in Paris in the 1920s, he designed toys, made wire portraits and, famously, created a traveling toy circus that he stashed in a series of suitcases. He was also handy around the house and, according to Guerrero, liked to make kitchen utensils whenever his wife Louisa needed something.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David Pagel
Just about everyone loves Alexander Calder (1898-1976). Casual observers enjoy the playful weightlessness of his mobiles, a genre of sculpture he may not have invented but owns so completely that it's almost impossible for another artist to make a mobile and not be compared, unfavorably, to Calder. Art specialists, who usually pooh-pooh such popular sentiments, also admire the elegant economy of Calder's streamlined forms and his graceful spatial arrangements. At L&M Arts, a fantastic two-gallery exhibition (and a large, outdoor sculpture)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In terms of legacy, Calder is the Hemingway of the art world. His work is so popular, accessible and deceptively easy that the most au courant scholars tend to pass it over, and other artists don't always own up to its influence. "It's almost like Calder is invisible because he's so ubiquitous," says L.A.-based artist Jason Meadows, who used to walk by one of his massive public sculptures as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. "When I was getting educated into the world of fine art, Abstract Expressionist painters were really hot and I got really charmed by Pop Art. Calder wasn't someone you would think about.
IMAGE
July 12, 2009 | Max Padilla
A reliable way to add a little dazzle to classics -- a white shirt, little black dress, T-shirt and blazer -- is to punch them up with conversation-piece jewelry. This month, Club Monaco offers some affordable contenders: six eye-catching necklaces inspired by artist Alexander Calder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA -- Think of Alexander Calder, and the first thing to come to mind probably would be the suspended abstract sculptures that silently orbit above the heads of museumgoers around the world. Though best known for those enormous yet graceful creations his friend and fellow artist Marcel Duchamp coined as "mobiles," Calder also created approximately 1,800 one-of-a-kind pieces of handmade jewelry throughout his artistic career.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2006 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
Too much often is made of biography in attempts to pinpoint origins of an artist's work, but in the case of Alexander Calder, known for his mobiles, "stabiles" and kinetic works made of wire, sheet metal and other materials, tracing biography feels like watching destiny unfold.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Playful functional objects created by Philadelphia-born sculptor and graphics artist Alexander Calder for his family and friends have gone on display in the United States for the first time at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York. Calder, who died in 1976, was known for his witty moving mobiles and grounded stabiles, and wit and whimsy are very much a part of the objects on display.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
A planned Philadelphia-based museum dedicated to the playful sculptures and mobiles of native son Alexander Calder will not open. The 35,000-square-foot Tadao Ando-designed museum was to open along Ben Franklin Parkway, across from the Rodin Museum and near both the Philadelphia Museum of Art and a proposed site for the Barnes Foundation's Impressionists-heavy art collection.
MAGAZINE
October 9, 2005 | Leigh Flayton, Leigh Flayton is a freelance writer based in Phoenix.
Fans of American architecture will gather later this month at downtown's Millennium Biltmore for a conference dedicated to Frank Lloyd Wright's work in Los Angeles. The five-day event features tours, lectures and a gala dinner to celebrate one of the world's most influential architects. Likely overlooked in all of that, though, will be a man whose presence in Wright's story makes him a real-life counterpart to Woody Allen's cinematic chameleon, Leonard Zelig. His name is Pedro E.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
A planned Philadelphia-based museum dedicated to the playful sculptures and mobiles of native son Alexander Calder will not open. The 35,000-square-foot Tadao Ando-designed museum was to open along Ben Franklin Parkway, across from the Rodin Museum and near both the Philadelphia Museum of Art and a proposed site for the Barnes Foundation's Impressionists-heavy art collection.
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