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Alexander I Lebed

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NEWS
October 22, 1996 | Washington Post
Alexander I. Lebed, the deposed Russian security chief, will be interviewed by Ted Koppel tonight on ABC-TV's "Nightline." The interview with Lebed in Moscow will be taped via satellite earlier today. ABC News says the interview will be Lebed's first on U.S. television since he was fired by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday. He is expected to discuss Yeltsin, the future of U.S.-Russian relations and his political plans, which could include a run at Yeltsin's job.
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NEWS
April 29, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Lebed, a rough-hewn, gravel-voiced general who once seemed bound for Russia's highest office until he overreached and found himself instead in the political wilderness, died Sunday in a helicopter crash in Siberia. He was 52.
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NEWS
May 18, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, the maverick politician feared by both the Kremlin and the Communist Party, returned to the forefront of national politics Sunday by winning the governorship of one of Russia's largest provinces. Reviving a political career that many pundits had declared over, Lebed defeated the incumbent governor of Krasnoyarsk, Valery Zubov, by a ratio of 56% to 39%, with 85% of the vote counted.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, the maverick politician feared by both the Kremlin and the Communist Party, returned to the forefront of national politics Sunday by winning the governorship of one of Russia's largest provinces. Reviving a political career that many pundits had declared over, Lebed defeated the incumbent governor of Krasnoyarsk, Valery Zubov, by a ratio of 56% to 39%, with 85% of the vote counted.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angrily ending a 4-month-old marriage of political convenience, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday stripped Alexander I. Lebed of the powerful job of security chief that he had bestowed on him early this summer and cast the flamboyant former general out of the Kremlin. Yeltsin said his aim was to end infighting over the presidential succession, at fever pitch since he announced Sept. 5 that he will undergo heart bypass surgery this year.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Mormons first came to the Russian capital about five years ago, city authorities gave the preachers from Utah what seemed an appropriate place to hold their prayer meetings: rooms in a ramshackle former Russian Orthodox monastery, closed decades before by the Soviet government. But as the strictures of communism fell away in the aftermath of the Soviet collapse, Russians were again permitted freedom of worship and, in 1993, President Boris N.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Lebed, the darling of the disaffected and political nemesis of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, resurfaced Friday after a mysterious two-month absence to stake his claim on the role of this nation's leader-in-waiting. Lebed reemerged onto the political scene with a freewheeling news conference, a feisty newspaper interview and the announcement that he is forming a new political party to present an opposition force to Yeltsin and his unpopular entourage.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian security chief Alexander I. Lebed, relishing his debut on the world political stage, emerged from NATO's military center praising the alliance and pledging closer cooperation. Lebed struck a moderate tone, in contrast to past outspoken attacks on NATO for its plans to expand eastward. The visit has been watched closely by Western officials eager to get his measure.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Former security chief Alexander I. Lebed finished first in the race for governor of a Siberian region but failed to win enough votes to avoid a runoff against the incumbent. Lebed hopes that a win in the gubernatorial race in Krasnoyarsk will serve as a steppingstone to the presidency. With 98% of the votes counted, Lebed was leading Gov. Valery Zubov by 45% to 36%. A Communist candidate was a distant third. A runoff in which Lebed is favored will be held May 17.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the strange world of Russian politics, moving to a remote corner of Siberia can be the best formula for amassing power in Moscow. Such is the case for retired army general and ousted Security Council chief Alexander I. Lebed, who has launched his campaign for the presidential race in 2000 by announcing that he will run for governor of the Krasnoyarsk region in April. Lebed, who was fired by President Boris N.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Former security chief Alexander I. Lebed finished first in the race for governor of a Siberian region but failed to win enough votes to avoid a runoff against the incumbent. Lebed hopes that a win in the gubernatorial race in Krasnoyarsk will serve as a steppingstone to the presidency. With 98% of the votes counted, Lebed was leading Gov. Valery Zubov by 45% to 36%. A Communist candidate was a distant third. A runoff in which Lebed is favored will be held May 17.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the strange world of Russian politics, moving to a remote corner of Siberia can be the best formula for amassing power in Moscow. Such is the case for retired army general and ousted Security Council chief Alexander I. Lebed, who has launched his campaign for the presidential race in 2000 by announcing that he will run for governor of the Krasnoyarsk region in April. Lebed, who was fired by President Boris N.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's not exactly gate-crashing, but Alexander I. Lebed, the retired Russian paratroop general, is still likely to throw White House protocol into convulsions at President Clinton's upcoming inauguration. Lebed, the brash and ambitious former national security chief who is now trying to elbow out Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, has wangled an invitation to the core celebrations of the American Inauguration Day and has been flaunting his inclusion as the highest social honor.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Lebed, the darling of the disaffected and political nemesis of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, resurfaced Friday after a mysterious two-month absence to stake his claim on the role of this nation's leader-in-waiting. Lebed reemerged onto the political scene with a freewheeling news conference, a feisty newspaper interview and the announcement that he is forming a new political party to present an opposition force to Yeltsin and his unpopular entourage.
NEWS
November 23, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after he was fired from his Kremlin job, Russian general-turned-politician Alexander I. Lebed wrapped up a five-day visit to the United States on Friday by assuring several hundred U.S. business leaders: "I am not a monster and a loose cannon. I do not bite."
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | Washington Post
Alexander I. Lebed, the deposed Russian security chief, will be interviewed by Ted Koppel tonight on ABC-TV's "Nightline." The interview with Lebed in Moscow will be taped via satellite earlier today. ABC News says the interview will be Lebed's first on U.S. television since he was fired by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday. He is expected to discuss Yeltsin, the future of U.S.-Russian relations and his political plans, which could include a run at Yeltsin's job.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fallout from parliamentary elections held nearly two weeks ago wafted into Russia's political circles Thursday, with a flurry of winners announcing presidential bids and incumbent Boris N. Yeltsin warning that heads will roll for his personal setbacks. Alexander I.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's not exactly gate-crashing, but Alexander I. Lebed, the retired Russian paratroop general, is still likely to throw White House protocol into convulsions at President Clinton's upcoming inauguration. Lebed, the brash and ambitious former national security chief who is now trying to elbow out Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, has wangled an invitation to the core celebrations of the American Inauguration Day and has been flaunting his inclusion as the highest social honor.
OPINION
October 20, 1996 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev, an international business consultant, writes frequently on Russian and Eastern European Affairs
The dramatic ouster of Russia's colorful "man on horseback," Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, again brings into sharp relief the inherent instability of a country that is in the middle of an intense succession power struggle, even as it waits to see if President Boris N. Yeltsin's job may not be available, after all.
NEWS
October 20, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin hastily appointed a loyal, moderate politician on Saturday to run his influential Security Council, two days after sacking the flamboyant would-be president, Alexander I. Lebed, from the post. Ivan P. Rybkin, former speaker of the Duma, the Russian parliament's lower house, has none of the menacing charisma of his ambitious predecessor and is unlikely to arouse the same deep enmities among other members of the Kremlin elite.
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