Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlexander I Solzhenitsyn
IN THE NEWS

Alexander I Solzhenitsyn

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 1994
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel laureate who was once the scourge of the Soviet Union and is now a critic of the Russian government, will address Parliament members Friday.8 The Duma, the lower house of Parliament, invited the author to speak of his return after two decades in exile in the United States. Solzhenitsyn landed in Vladivostok on May 27 and embarked on a long cross-country trip to Moscow to rediscover his homeland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 6, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, an author imprisoned and then forced into exile for his critical depictions of the Soviet Union, lay in a marble chamber in the heart of the capital Tuesday, guarded by Russian soldiers and mourned by thousands of his countrymen. All day long, the onetime dissident lay waxy and white under bright layers of flowers in the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 31, 1988
An anti-Stalinist conference of leading intellectuals and human rights activists from across the Soviet Union proposed Nobel Peace laureate Andrei D. Sakharov as a candidate for the Soviet Parliament. The Moscow conference, attended by about 600 delegates, also called for Soviet citizenship to be restored to exiled Nobel literature laureate Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn.
NEWS
October 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn thundered into Russian politics Friday with his first speech to Parliament--a blistering dissection of post-Soviet life in which democracy remains just a dream. Lawmakers greeted the gray-bearded writer warmly and applauded often early in his 50-minute speech. But they cooled and applause grew sparse as he turned his ire on virtually every political current, from market reformers to Communists to the leaders of restive regions and republics.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn's banned chronicle of dictator Josef Stalin's labor camps, "The Gulag Archipelago," will be published this year by a literary journal, a secretary at the magazine said Friday. Selected chapters from the lengthy book will appear before year's end in the magazine Novy Mir, the secretary, Valentina Ivanovna, said in a telephone interview. She refused to say who in the Soviet leadership had approved publication of the gripping tale of repression under Stalin.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union's new ideology chief said Tuesday that he opposes the publication of the "Gulag Archipelago" and other works by exiled author Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn because they would undermine Soviet society. "I am against the publication of a number of works by Solzhenitsyn, and in the first place such works as 'Lenin in Zurich' and the 'Gulag Archipelago,' " said Politburo member Vadim A. Medvedev.
NEWS
October 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn thundered into Russian politics Friday with his first speech to Parliament--a blistering dissection of post-Soviet life in which democracy remains just a dream. Lawmakers greeted the gray-bearded writer warmly and applauded often early in his 50-minute speech. But they cooled and applause grew sparse as he turned his ire on virtually every political current, from market reformers to Communists to the leaders of restive regions and republics.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, Russia's most revered living writer, will return home next year after two decades of exile in the United States but will not become involved in Russian politics, his wife said in a television interview broadcast Saturday. "We are already on our way to Russia," said Natalya Solzhenitsyn, adding that the homecoming, tentatively set for May, 1994, would depend on the completion of a home the couple is building on the outskirts of Moscow.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of his first acts after landing in America on Monday, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin phoned Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn to voice contrition for past Kremlin persecution and to assure the Nobel literature laureate that "Russia's doors are wide open" for his return, Yeltsin's spokesman said. "In the words of the president, one could feel undertones of repentance," Vyacheslav V.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 20-year exile in the West and an eight-week rail trek across Russia, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn returned to Moscow on Thursday night with a litany of complaints from his compatriots and a grim verdict that this country and its reforms are "in big, heavy and multifaceted trouble." "Nobody expected that the way out of communism would be painless, but nobody expected it would be so painful," Russia's greatest living writer declared.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel laureate who was once the scourge of the Soviet Union and is now a critic of the Russian government, will address Parliament members Friday.8 The Duma, the lower house of Parliament, invited the author to speak of his return after two decades in exile in the United States. Solzhenitsyn landed in Vladivostok on May 27 and embarked on a long cross-country trip to Moscow to rediscover his homeland.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 20-year exile in the West and an eight-week rail trek across Russia, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn returned to Moscow on Thursday night with a litany of complaints from his compatriots and a grim verdict that this country and its reforms are "in big, heavy and multifaceted trouble." "Nobody expected that the way out of communism would be painless, but nobody expected it would be so painful," Russia's greatest living writer declared.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, Russia's most revered living writer, will return home next year after two decades of exile in the United States but will not become involved in Russian politics, his wife said in a television interview broadcast Saturday. "We are already on our way to Russia," said Natalya Solzhenitsyn, adding that the homecoming, tentatively set for May, 1994, would depend on the completion of a home the couple is building on the outskirts of Moscow.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bracing for a major showdown this week with the Russian Parliament, President Boris N. Yeltsin has solicited and won support for the principle of strong presidential rule from Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, considered by Russians to be their country's greatest living writer. "Yes, the Russian Federation with its size and diversity cannot exist without a strong presidential authority, which should be no weaker than that of the United States," Solzhenitsyn wrote from his home in Cavendish, Vt.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of his first acts after landing in America on Monday, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin phoned Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn to voice contrition for past Kremlin persecution and to assure the Nobel literature laureate that "Russia's doors are wide open" for his return, Yeltsin's spokesman said. "In the words of the president, one could feel undertones of repentance," Vyacheslav V.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's chief prosecutor Tuesday dropped treason charges against the Russian novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, clearing the way for the Nobel Prize-winner to return home after 17 years of exile. Nikolai Trubin, the Soviet prosecutor general, said there is no evidence to substantiate charges that Russia's greatest living author had "betrayed the motherland" through his sharply critical writings on the Soviet era.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what an official described Thursday as a mass apology for past injustices, Soviet citizenship has been restored for novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn and 22 others who were once reviled and punished as critics of the Soviet system.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's chief prosecutor Tuesday dropped treason charges against the Russian novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, clearing the way for the Nobel Prize-winner to return home after 17 years of exile. Nikolai Trubin, the Soviet prosecutor general, said there is no evidence to substantiate charges that Russia's greatest living author had "betrayed the motherland" through his sharply critical writings on the Soviet era.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what an official described Thursday as a mass apology for past injustices, Soviet citizenship has been restored for novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn and 22 others who were once reviled and punished as critics of the Soviet system.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn's banned chronicle of dictator Josef Stalin's labor camps, "The Gulag Archipelago," will be published this year by a literary journal, a secretary at the magazine said Friday. Selected chapters from the lengthy book will appear before year's end in the magazine Novy Mir, the secretary, Valentina Ivanovna, said in a telephone interview. She refused to say who in the Soviet leadership had approved publication of the gripping tale of repression under Stalin.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|