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Alexander Litvinenko

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WORLD
February 10, 2007 | Kim Murphy and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Yuri Felshtinsky well remembers when he spent the better part of five hours pleading for the life of his friend Alexander Litvinenko. It was May 22, 2000. Litvinenko, a colonel in the Russian Federal Security Service, or FSB, had just spent four months in prison, having gone public with allegations that senior secret police officers were involved in killings and kidnappings for financial gain. Now he was free, but for how long? Felshtinsky called up Litvinenko's former boss, Maj. Gen.
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WORLD
January 27, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
If you're looking for Russia's most notorious international outlaw, try his new office in parliament. Andrei Lugovoy, the prime suspect in the 2006 radioactive poisoning death of a former Russian spy in London, is a celebrated figure these days in the Russian capital. Not only has Moscow brushed aside extradition requests from Britain, this onetime bodyguard has just been elected to the marble halls of the Duma, the lower house of parliament. Lugovoy says he was framed.
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NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An expert on Russian intelligence was critically injured in a shooting in the driveway of his suburban Washington home. The shooting of Paul Joyal, 53, came days after he accused the Russian government of involvement in the poisoning of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. The FBI was assisting in the investigation. The motive for Thursday's attack is unknown.
WORLD
January 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A British cultural organization reopened offices in two cities in defiance of an order to close, drawing an angry response from Russia, which promised punitive measures. Britain's ambassador said any action against the British Council in St. Petersburg and Yekaterinburg would violate international law. The council, which acts as the cultural arm of the British Embassy, reopened its offices after the holidays. Ties between Britain and Russia are badly frayed by the 2006 poisoning death in London of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko.
WORLD
January 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An exiled Russian billionaire said he would be willing to speak to Russian police investigating the death of former spy Alexander Litvinenko -- but only if they are first checked for weapons and poison. Boris Berezovsky, a fierce critic of the Kremlin, was a friend of Litvinenko, who died in November several weeks after falling ill with what was later determined to be radiation poisoning.
WORLD
January 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Police have concluded that the radioactive polonium-210 that poisoned a former Russian spy was added to his tea at a London hotel, British and American television stations reported. Investigators have identified the teapot believed to have contained the radioactive tea, which eventually killed Alexander Litvinenko in November, Sky News said, citing unnamed Scotland Yard officials. ABC News had a similar report, citing an unidentified official.
WORLD
January 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A British cultural organization reopened offices in two cities in defiance of an order to close, drawing an angry response from Russia, which promised punitive measures. Britain's ambassador said any action against the British Council in St. Petersburg and Yekaterinburg would violate international law. The council, which acts as the cultural arm of the British Embassy, reopened its offices after the holidays. Ties between Britain and Russia are badly frayed by the 2006 poisoning death in London of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko.
WORLD
July 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown's government ordered the expulsion of four Russian diplomats Monday over the Kremlin's refusal to extradite the key suspect in the fatal poisoning of a former KGB spy. Alexander Litvinenko died Nov. 23 in a London hospital after ingesting radioactive polonium-210. In a deathbed statement, the 43-year-old accused Russian President Vladimir V. Putin of being behind his killing.
WORLD
March 31, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Exiled Russian "oligarch" Boris Berezovsky, a prominent critic of the Kremlin who has fought extradition to his country for years, agreed to be questioned here Friday by a Russian investigator examining the killing of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. The outspoken billionaire has been waging a free-spending campaign to unseat President Vladimir V. Putin, whose government he believes is behind Litvinenko's death.
WORLD
December 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Russian prosecutors said Wednesday that Leonid Nevzlin, a former top manager of the Yukos business empire, may have ordered the poisoning of former Russian KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. "A version is being looked at that those who ordered these crimes could be the same people who are on an international wanted list for serious and very serious crimes, one of whom is ... Leonid Nevzlin," the Russian prosecutor general's office said in a statement posted on its website, www.genproc.gov.ru.
WORLD
July 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown's government ordered the expulsion of four Russian diplomats Monday over the Kremlin's refusal to extradite the key suspect in the fatal poisoning of a former KGB spy. Alexander Litvinenko died Nov. 23 in a London hospital after ingesting radioactive polonium-210. In a deathbed statement, the 43-year-old accused Russian President Vladimir V. Putin of being behind his killing.
WORLD
March 31, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Exiled Russian "oligarch" Boris Berezovsky, a prominent critic of the Kremlin who has fought extradition to his country for years, agreed to be questioned here Friday by a Russian investigator examining the killing of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. The outspoken billionaire has been waging a free-spending campaign to unseat President Vladimir V. Putin, whose government he believes is behind Litvinenko's death.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An expert on Russian intelligence was critically injured in a shooting in the driveway of his suburban Washington home. The shooting of Paul Joyal, 53, came days after he accused the Russian government of involvement in the poisoning of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. The FBI was assisting in the investigation. The motive for Thursday's attack is unknown.
WORLD
February 10, 2007 | Kim Murphy and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Yuri Felshtinsky well remembers when he spent the better part of five hours pleading for the life of his friend Alexander Litvinenko. It was May 22, 2000. Litvinenko, a colonel in the Russian Federal Security Service, or FSB, had just spent four months in prison, having gone public with allegations that senior secret police officers were involved in killings and kidnappings for financial gain. Now he was free, but for how long? Felshtinsky called up Litvinenko's former boss, Maj. Gen.
WORLD
January 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Police have concluded that the radioactive polonium-210 that poisoned a former Russian spy was added to his tea at a London hotel, British and American television stations reported. Investigators have identified the teapot believed to have contained the radioactive tea, which eventually killed Alexander Litvinenko in November, Sky News said, citing unnamed Scotland Yard officials. ABC News had a similar report, citing an unidentified official.
WORLD
January 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An exiled Russian billionaire said he would be willing to speak to Russian police investigating the death of former spy Alexander Litvinenko -- but only if they are first checked for weapons and poison. Boris Berezovsky, a fierce critic of the Kremlin, was a friend of Litvinenko, who died in November several weeks after falling ill with what was later determined to be radiation poisoning.
WORLD
December 8, 2006 | David Holley and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
Alexander Litvinenko, the former KGB agent at the center of an international poisoning mystery, was buried here Thursday, his body still so radioactive that health officials wouldn't let it be displayed at a memorial service.
OPINION
November 25, 2006
ANOTHER KGB poisoning? Sounds like the 1950s all over again. Yet here we are, nearly in 2007, with Russia's ex-spy-chief-turned-president running a country where nasty crimes still cast suspicion on the state security forces. Of course, Moscow's foreign intelligence service emphatically denies that it had anything to do with the hideous poisoning death in London of the former-KGB-spy-turned-dissident Alexander Litvinenko, who died Thursday night.
WORLD
December 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Russian prosecutors said Wednesday that Leonid Nevzlin, a former top manager of the Yukos business empire, may have ordered the poisoning of former Russian KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. "A version is being looked at that those who ordered these crimes could be the same people who are on an international wanted list for serious and very serious crimes, one of whom is ... Leonid Nevzlin," the Russian prosecutor general's office said in a statement posted on its website, www.genproc.gov.ru.
WORLD
December 12, 2006 | David Holley and Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writers
Investigators here questioned a key witness Monday in the radiation poisoning death of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, as four more possible victims of contamination were hospitalized for tests -- this time in Germany. The latest potential victims of radioactive polonium-210 were the former wife of Russian businessman Dmitry Kovtun, her boyfriend and her two children, 1 and 3. Kovtun and a second Russian, Andrei Lugovoy, met with Litvinenko in London hours before he fell ill Nov.
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