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Alexander V Korzhakov

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NEWS
February 11, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked as his chief bodyguard last summer wound up the first part of his comeback plan Monday by winning a parliamentary seat from the central Russian town of Tula. Now Russians are waiting nervously to see how quickly the triumphant Alexander V. Korzhakov, whose place in parliament gives him immunity from prosecution, will carry out part two of his plan--to get revenge on his many political enemies by revealing the secrets he learned as a Kremlin insider.
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NEWS
August 13, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If revenge is a dish best eaten cold, then Alexander V. Korzhakov, the hard-liner President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked as his chief bodyguard last summer, is hoping for a feast this week. The former KGB general today publishes a book of memoirs about his 11 years as Yeltsin's most faithful servant. Excerpts published in the Russian press portray Yeltsin as an alcoholic lord of misrule and his reign as a confused lurch from one vodka-sodden crisis to the next.
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NEWS
August 13, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If revenge is a dish best eaten cold, then Alexander V. Korzhakov, the hard-liner President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked as his chief bodyguard last summer, is hoping for a feast this week. The former KGB general today publishes a book of memoirs about his 11 years as Yeltsin's most faithful servant. Excerpts published in the Russian press portray Yeltsin as an alcoholic lord of misrule and his reign as a confused lurch from one vodka-sodden crisis to the next.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked as his chief bodyguard last summer wound up the first part of his comeback plan Monday by winning a parliamentary seat from the central Russian town of Tula. Now Russians are waiting nervously to see how quickly the triumphant Alexander V. Korzhakov, whose place in parliament gives him immunity from prosecution, will carry out part two of his plan--to get revenge on his many political enemies by revealing the secrets he learned as a Kremlin insider.
NEWS
October 29, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin slipped deeper into the background of Russian rule Monday when his aides announced he was canceling even his hospital room meetings during a final phase of preparation for heart surgery. The president's latest retreat from the public limelight since his July reelection intensified concern that the 65-year-old leader is too frail to rule this country, although Kremlin officials insisted the work suspension was a routine step ahead of his bypass operation.
NEWS
November 4, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stiff and slurring President Boris N. Yeltsin appeared on television Friday in an apparent attempt to ease growing concerns about his health and who is running Russia. The heavily edited film footage gave the Russian public and the outside world their first look at the 64-year-old leader since he suffered a heart ailment nine days ago. But the tape showing less than one minute of his half-hour meeting with Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin may have raised more questions than it answered.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's snowing in Moscow, and those who speak for Boris N. Yeltsin want it known that the Russian leader, while seriously ill, is not insensitive to commuters stuck in snowbound traffic and elderly pedestrians slipping on the ice. Just the other day, the president's press service reported, Yeltsin summoned Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov to his hospital bedside and dressed him down for the clumsy response by the city's 4,000 snowplows to this winter's first storm.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin chided his top security aide for urging postponement of Russia's June 16 presidential election and promised Monday that the vote will be held on schedule. "I trust in the wisdom of Russian voters," Yeltsin told the Interfax news agency. "That is why elections will be held in the time determined by the constitution." Politicians across the spectrum welcomed Yeltsin's pledge and scorned the advice of his security chief, Gen. Alexander V.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadowy and powerful hard-liners in President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle are trying to consolidate their power by creating an elite National Guard to neutralize any internal threats, Russia's leading newspaper reported Tuesday. The article in the daily Izvestia was seen as the latest in a series of signals that Kremlin hawks and a resurgent KGB are trying--albeit fitfully and with resistance--to reimpose Soviet-style political controls on Russia.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long night of Kremlin intrigue, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired three powerful Cabinet ministers Thursday, continuing a purge of unpopular hard-liners before a runoff election against his Communist challenger. The ousted men--Gen. Alexander V. Korzhakov, Yeltsin's personal security chief; Gen. Mikhail I. Barsukov, head of the Federal Security Service; and Oleg N.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Boris N. Yeltsin was rushed to the hospital last week with a new bout of heart disease, Russia has been gripped by speculation that its unpopular president is near death and that his post-Soviet reforms may be swept away in an imminent--and possibly bloody--change of leadership. Naina I. Yeltsin endured all that silently, with pain in her own heart--until Tuesday.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cynical voters in central Russia go to the polls today for a democratic election, ruthless post-Soviet style, with their eyes firmly on the bottom line, their pockets stuffed with campaign freebies and a rogues' gallery of parliamentary candidates from which to choose. "Who cares who wins?" said Alexander G. Yermakov, editor of the local newspaper Tulskiye Izvestia. "People are treating this election as if they were betting on a horse at the races. It's all just 'Will my nag win?'
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