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Alexander V Korzhakov

NEWS
July 13, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a flurry of medical updates unprecedented for the Kremlin, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was described Wednesday as up and walking, signing documents, making phone calls and getting over the heart trouble that hospitalized him a day earlier. "Yeltsin's condition is good, he is recovering quickly," Sergei A. Filatov, the presidential chief of staff, announced. "Under the doctors' plan, he will be discharged from the hospital Monday and return to a normal work schedule."
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NEWS
December 27, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sobering blow to Russia's legendary drinkers just before the year's biggest binge, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday announced a government takeover of all alcohol production and marketing to wring out more tax revenues to settle staggering state debts.
NEWS
October 28, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's latest spate of coronary trouble has caused heartbeats to skip throughout the political world as diplomats and lawmakers ponder the dark events that could unfold should the weakening champion of reform die in office. Although foreign leaders publicly express confidence that any transition of power would be carried out in a constitutional manner, more candid political analysts warn of a looming succession struggle that could culminate in a military coup.
OPINION
May 12, 1996 | Gregory Freidin, Gregory Freidin, chairman of the Slavic department at Stanford University, is co-author of "Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August, 1991, Coup" (M.E. Sharp Publishers)
The most recent calls for the postponement of the June presidential election in Russia have brought into sharp relief three fundamental and interrelated problems facing the country's young democracy: the language of politics, the rules of the political game and the national ideals that lend legitimacy to the unglamorous daily business of government politics.
NEWS
July 8, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin has wasted no time in putting new Security Council chief Alexander I. Lebed in his postelection place. There is absolutely no need for the gruff retired general to take on the title of vice president, Chernomyrdin says, and he is equally dismissive of Lebed's loud musings that he could help put the economy right.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is clearly ill, disturbingly absent and perhaps not long for this world, but President Boris N. Yeltsin's latest maneuverings suggest that he still calls the shots in the Kremlin and wants to define the course that Russia will follow even after he is gone. The sacking last week of maverick Security Council chief Alexander I. Lebed--and his replacement with the congenial and unifying figure of Ivan P.
NEWS
December 22, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there's one thing parliamentary elections proved this week, it's that there is a place for everyone in Russia's democracy. The deputies who will take their seats in January in the Duma, parliament's lower house, represent virtually every strain of ideology--and political malady--to visit Russia in recent times. Did your political party formerly participate in mass repression, killings and the deportation of millions of people to labor camps? There's no need to apologize.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He won the first round. He wooed the kingmaker. He got his way in the timing of the runoff and chased the hawks from the Kremlin. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has made all the right moves to clinch reelection in a July 3 showdown with Communist Party chief Gennady A. Zyuganov. But the vagaries of Russia's unformed democracy still make victory far from a sure thing.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What a time for a nose job. Why would the president of a major power decide to enter the hospital for optional surgery to repair a deviated septum in his nose--surgery that aides said would require a recovery period of up to eight days--immediately after approving a controversial invasion of a rebellious province? Yet that is exactly what Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When acting Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin arrived at the Russian White House in triumph last week to claim his office as head of the government, he was not the first to walk through the door. Striding in ahead of Chernomyrdin was the man who many believe put him there: tycoon Boris A. Berezovsky. A billionaire banker who controls one of Russia's largest business empires, Berezovsky has emerged as one of the biggest winners in the high-stakes struggle for power in Russia.
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