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BUSINESS
May 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Alfred Berkeley, a top executive at the Baltimore investment firm Alex Brown & Sons, is the leading contender to become president of the Nasdaq Stock Market, sources said. Berkeley is not the only candidate and his selection is not definite. But the Alex Brown managing director has emerged as the front-runner, the source said Monday, speaking on condition he not be identified. Berkeley, who heads Alex Brown's investment technology group, didn't return a telephone call seeking comment.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Alfred Berkeley, a top executive at the Baltimore investment firm Alex Brown & Sons, is the leading contender to become president of the Nasdaq Stock Market, sources said. Berkeley is not the only candidate and his selection is not definite. But the Alex Brown managing director has emerged as the front-runner, the source said Monday, speaking on condition he not be identified. Berkeley, who heads Alex Brown's investment technology group, didn't return a telephone call seeking comment.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The Nasdaq Stock Market is considering expanding trading hours to as late as 9 p.m. New York time at the second-largest U.S. stock market, Nasdaq President Alfred Berkeley said Tuesday. A Nasdaq committee also is looking at whether to start trading as much as an hour earlier, Berkeley said. Main Nasdaq trading hours are now 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern time.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Nasdaq Stock Market said it can't meet the Securities and Exchange Commission's deadline for complying with new rules on the way it lists stock prices. Meeting the SEC's Jan. 10 deadline requires changes in Nasdaq's trading system that can't be completed until the second quarter of 1997 at the earliest, Nasdaq President Alfred Berkeley said in a letter to Richard Lindsey, SEC director of market regulation.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nasdaq Delists Two Companies: The Nasdaq Stock Market delisted two companies cited by the Justice Department in fraud charges brought in Brooklyn, N.Y. The conduct of the companies, Lighthouse Point, Fla.-based ICIS Management Group Inc. and West Babylon, N.Y.-based Comprehensive Environmental Systems Inc., was "egregious," said Nasdaq President Alfred Berkeley. The U.S. attorney in Brooklyn announced Oct.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The National Assn. of Securities Dealers expects to propose rules aimed at curbing the volatility that has characterized recent initial public offerings of many Internet company stocks, Nasdaq President Alfred Berkeley said Monday. The rules, which would need Securities and Exchange Commission approval, would seek to increase the visibility of the "true IPO market" before trading opens on a new stock, Berkeley said.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2000 | Reuters, Bloomberg News
Nasdaq's parent, the National Assn. of Securities Dealers, on Thursday named a new management team to prepare the organization for the planned spinoff of the No. 2 U.S. stock market. The NASD said Robert Glauber, 61, an adjunct lecturer at Harvard University, will become NASD's chief executive Nov. 1, replacing Frank Zarb, a Wall Street veteran now at retirement age.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
The Nasdaq Stock Market, chastened by criticism that it failed to protect small investors, is out to tell 55 million investors that it's changed. With a 15-second television ad blitz and newspaper ad campaign in the next four months--as well as an enhanced World Wide Web site--the nation's second-largest stock market will be telling investors about the new rules the Securities and Exchange Commission approved last month.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1997
"It is important to remember that the fundamentals of the United States economy are strong and have been for the past several years. And the prospects for continued growth with low inflation and low unemployment are strong." --U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin * "I believe in the tuna fish theory of investing: If I told you that tuna fish was 25% off, you'd say, 'Back up the truck and unload.' Now that the market's down 25%, the same theorem should apply.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
The three leading U.S. stock markets say they are contributing a total of $520,000 to try to defeat a California ballot proposal that would make it easier for shareholders to sue companies for fraud. Nasdaq, the New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange say Proposition 211 would hamper companies' ability to raise capital by discouraging them from making financial forecasts and by increasing legal expenses.
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