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Alfred Dreyfus

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NEWS
June 9, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Honoring a delayed debt to a soldier it disgraced almost 100 years ago, France on Wednesday put up a controversial bronze statue of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus in the Tuileries Gardens of Paris. More than two years after the 12-foot-high statue was finished, a crane lifted it onto a pedestal in a clearing surrounded by luxuriant trees. The statue had been gathering dust in a foundry while politicians argued about where to put it. This controversy was looked on as no more than a mini-affair.
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NEWS
December 15, 2002 | Ian James, Associated Press Writer
Once there was no escape from Devil's Island. Now there is no access. The irony may be unintended, but visitors to what used to be the world's most infamous prison are warded off by a sign saying: "Access to Devil's Island is strictly forbidden." Year after year, from the 19th century and well into the 20th, inmates dreamed in vain of leaving the tiny island of palm trees and jagged volcanic stone and returning home to France.
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NEWS
February 18, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been a century since the French army framed Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish captain, on a charge of passing secrets to the Germans, convicted him in a closed-door court-martial and shipped him off to Devil's Island with a life prison sentence. Everyone involved in that shameful episode died long ago. Dreyfus himself was eventually exonerated and returned to active duty, fighting alongside his son in World War I and receiving the French Legion of Honor medal.
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been a century since the French army framed Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish captain, on a charge of passing secrets to the Germans, convicted him in a closed-door court-martial and shipped him off to Devil's Island with a life prison sentence. Everyone involved in that shameful episode died long ago. Dreyfus himself was eventually exonerated and returned to active duty, fighting alongside his son in World War I and receiving the French Legion of Honor medal.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dark, cavernous mixing studio on the Disney lot, Richard Dreyfuss stood before a sprawling movie screen, watching and listening to a cluster of children: Alfred Dreyfus, Alfred Dreyfus, Dirty Jew, dirty Jew, Safe on Devil's Island, safe on Devil's Island, Let him stew, let him stew. The children on screen were skipping rope in front of a Catholic church to the meter of a playground rhyme about Capt.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | United Press International
The court exploded in anger today as a lawyer for accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk compared the retired U.S. auto worker's trial to the notorious case of Alfred Dreyfus, a Jewish army officer in France falsely accused of treason in 1894. Defense attorney Paul Chumak made the analogy to the case that was laced with anti-Semitism in summations in the trial of Demjanjuk, 67, a native Ukrainian accused of being the sadistic Treblinka death camp guard "Ivan the Terrible."
NEWS
December 15, 2002 | Ian James, Associated Press Writer
Once there was no escape from Devil's Island. Now there is no access. The irony may be unintended, but visitors to what used to be the world's most infamous prison are warded off by a sign saying: "Access to Devil's Island is strictly forbidden." Year after year, from the 19th century and well into the 20th, inmates dreamed in vain of leaving the tiny island of palm trees and jagged volcanic stone and returning home to France.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1985 | Associated Press
The richest of the rich in America is worth $2.8 billion, while the poorest of the rich checks in at a mere $150 million. But who's counting? Forbes magazine, that's who, and its 1985 list of the nation's 400 richest people is topped by Sam Moore Walton of Bentonville, Ark., who has made $2.8 billion through his Wal-Mart discount stores. Walton, who danced a hula on Wall Street last year when profit goals were met, replaced Gordon Getty, the front-runner for the past two years.
NEWS
February 18, 1988
A judge in the Nazi war crimes trial of John Demjanjuk reprimanded a defense attorney for comparing the proceedings to France's "Dreyfus affair," in which a Jewish officer in the French army was falsely convicted of treason. Attorney Paul Chumak told the Jerusalem trial during closing arguments that "Capt. (Alfred) Dreyfus was convicted at the beginning of the century on the basis of false documents in a wave of anti-Semitism. Paralleling this with anti-Ukrainianism, this trial has all the earmarks of the Dreyfus trial."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1990
Bruce Fein ("Don't Make a Dreyfus of Oliver North," Commentary, July 22) and this writer rarely if ever agree. This time, however, he has, even for him, gone beyond reason to obfuscate an issue. There is no way that North can be compared to Alfred Dreyfus. Dreyfus was innocent and North from his own testimony is guilty. Dreyfus was persecuted because of religion. North was not persecuted, he was and is guilty of breaking laws. To claim exoneration for North because of the past misdeeds of others is a specious argument.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dark, cavernous mixing studio on the Disney lot, Richard Dreyfuss stood before a sprawling movie screen, watching and listening to a cluster of children: Alfred Dreyfus, Alfred Dreyfus, Dirty Jew, dirty Jew, Safe on Devil's Island, safe on Devil's Island, Let him stew, let him stew. The children on screen were skipping rope in front of a Catholic church to the meter of a playground rhyme about Capt.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Honoring a delayed debt to a soldier it disgraced almost 100 years ago, France on Wednesday put up a controversial bronze statue of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus in the Tuileries Gardens of Paris. More than two years after the 12-foot-high statue was finished, a crane lifted it onto a pedestal in a clearing surrounded by luxuriant trees. The statue had been gathering dust in a foundry while politicians argued about where to put it. This controversy was looked on as no more than a mini-affair.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | United Press International
The court exploded in anger today as a lawyer for accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk compared the retired U.S. auto worker's trial to the notorious case of Alfred Dreyfus, a Jewish army officer in France falsely accused of treason in 1894. Defense attorney Paul Chumak made the analogy to the case that was laced with anti-Semitism in summations in the trial of Demjanjuk, 67, a native Ukrainian accused of being the sadistic Treblinka death camp guard "Ivan the Terrible."
BOOKS
June 15, 1986 | Merle Rubin
ZOLA by Philip Walker (Routledge & Kegan Paul: $16.75; 257 pp.). Ambitious yet altruistic, publicity-seeking yet public-spirited, Emile Zola (1840-1902) was passionately determined to become what he in fact became: one of the central prophetic figures of his century. The brutal realism of such novels as "Therese Raquin," "L'Assommoir," "Nana," "Germinal," "La Terre" and "La Debacle" shocked the French reading public, outraged critics and assured his place in literary history.
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