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Alfred Hitchcock

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
For fans of older films on bigger screens, Saturday night presents a real dilemma. Should you go the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and catch the last two films of the Jean Renoir retrospective, which just happen to be two of the best: the classic "The Rules of the Game" and the charming not-on-DVD "A Day in the Country"? Or should you go to UCLA's Royce Auditorium for an organ tribute to the partnership between composer Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock, including an improvised Herrmannesque organ score to Hitchcock's silent 1927 thriller, "The Lodger"?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2014 | By Susan King
Long-missing comedy shorts such as 1927's “Mickey's Circus,” featuring a 6-year-old Mickey Rooney in his first starring role, 1917's "Neptune's Naughty Daughter"; 1925's “Fifty Million Years Ago,” an animated introduction to the theory of evolution; and a 1924 industrial short, “The Last Word in Chickens,” are among the American silent films recently found at the EYE Filmmusem in Amsterdam. EYE and the San Francisco-based National Film Preservation Foundation have partnered to repatriate and preserve these films -- the majority either don't exist in the U.S. or only in inferior prints.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Think of it as a Hitchcock-a-palooza. It may be the summer of such blockbuster spectacles as "Man of Steel," "The Lone Ranger" and "World War Z," but it's also the summer of movies by a real-life legend: Alfred Hitchcock. His films are screening at several venues around L.A. in the coming weeks. Some of them will be familiar to audiences, others not. On Tuesday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is showing both the sound and silent versions of his 1929 thriller "Blackmail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Joan Fontaine, the coolly beautiful 1940s actress who won an Academy Award for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion" and who became almost as well-known for her lifelong feud with her famous older sister, Olivia de Havilland, died Sunday. She was 96. Fontaine died of natural causes at her home in Carmel, said her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer. In addition to winning an Academy Award as best actress for "Suspicion," Fontaine was also nominated as best actress for her role in Hitchcock's "Rebecca" (1940)
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Harrison, a major writer and producer for Alfred Hitchcock and once the only woman feature film producer in Hollywood, has died at the age of 83. Miss Harrison died Aug. 14 in London, her colleague and friend Norman Lloyd said Tuesday in Los Angeles. A native of England, Miss Harrison had lived in London for the past 20 years with her husband, novelist Eric Ambler.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1998
With more than a half-dozen remakes of Alfred Hitchcock movies due for release in theaters (and on TV) over the next couple of years, purists may carp that the film industry is once again strip-mining its past. But in the case of the master of suspense, what's more surprising is that it took Hollywood so long to raid his vault of treasured titles. "He's one of the classicists," says Bruce Berman, producer of a second remake of Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" and former Warner Bros.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for the Times Orange County Edition.
Most movie terror is built on a worry most of us share--that the ordinary can turn strange and dangerous in an instant. Bad filmmakers may blunder along, but the good ones massage us with hints of the unexpected, then come up with a move nobody saw coming. Alfred Hitchcock had some of the best moves in the business. His pictures were like smooth card tricks: You could see the ace heading that way, but damn if it didn't end up over there. Hitchcock could both tickle and thrill.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Much of the genius of Alfred Hitchcock, of course, is that he understood -- perhaps better than any other filmmaker -- that the power of any movie came from the psychological as much as the visual chords that could be played. Which is why, nearly 50 years after its release in 1960, the 45-second shower scene in "Psycho" is still terrifying and paralyzing. And if you think it's scary on cable, try it again in the dark of a theater, where you can join in the communal scream when . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though he had been scaring the wits out of moviegoers for nearly 30 years, Alfred Hitchcock, in his words, "brought murder back into the living room--where it belongs." He was host, executive producer and occasional director of the 1955-65 anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," which aired on CBS and then moved to NBC (in its last three years expanded to an hour, retitled "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour").
BOOKS
September 28, 2003 | John Boorman, John Boorman is the director of such films as "Deliverance," "Point Blank" and "Hope and Glory." His autobiography will be published in November.
Patrick McGilligan's "Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light" is a preemptive strike against anyone else planning a book on Hitch. Quoting freely from the Francois Truffaut interviews, John Russell Taylor's official biography, Donald Spoto's "The Dark Side of Genius" and dozens more books, hundreds of interviews, the testimony of Hitchcock scholars and minutiae unearthed from archives the world over -- it is magnificently exhaustive, absolutely definitive, marvelously magisterial.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Claire Noland
Ed Lauter, 74, a character actor who carved out a niche in the 1970s playing mostly heavies in movies and TV and kept up a busy schedule in recent years with appearances in Clint Eastwood's “Trouble With the Curve” and Oscar winner “The Artist,” died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles of mesothelioma, a form of cancer that affects tissue surrounding internal organs. Family spokesman Edward Lozzi announced his death. “A lot of people say, 'I know you,' but they don't know my name,” Lauter told The Times in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Susan King
In Robert Altman's acclaimed 2001 British mystery “Gosford Park,” Jeremy Northam played the famed singer-actor-composer Ivor Novello. The real Novello, who was born in Wales in 1913 and died in London in 1951, made two of Alfred Hitchcock's early silent films - the 1926 mystery-thriller “The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog” and 1927's “Downhill,” which was Hitch's first stab, so to speak, at the “wrong man” plot - a theme he...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Think of it as a Hitchcock-a-palooza. It may be the summer of such blockbuster spectacles as "Man of Steel," "The Lone Ranger" and "World War Z," but it's also the summer of movies by a real-life legend: Alfred Hitchcock. His films are screening at several venues around L.A. in the coming weeks. Some of them will be familiar to audiences, others not. On Tuesday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is showing both the sound and silent versions of his 1929 thriller "Blackmail.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
When, in her famous essay "A Room of One's Own," Virginia Woolf conjured the tragically compelling possibility of Shakespeare's sister, a new sort of narrative was born - the reclamation of female characters who previously lurked at the edges of epic tales. Queens and consorts, mothers and parlor maids have all gotten their due in retellings of famous works, from the Bible to the tales of Sherlock Holmes. And now here's Mama Bates. The mother of cinematic serial killer Norman Bates is among the most famous off-stage characters in dramatic history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
With his acute sense of irony and the macabre, Alfred Hitchcock would appreciate the fact that he's one of the hottest directors in the world even though he's been dead for 32 years. Fans and critics have always been fascinated with the Master of Suspense, who directed such seminal films as 1940's "Rebecca," 1945's "Spellbound," 1946's "Notorious," 1954's "Rear Window," 1960's "Psycho" and 1963's "The Birds. " But 2012 has been an exceptional year in the Hitchcock legacy. For decades, the British Film Institute's periodical Sight and Sound's poll of critics named Orson Welles' 1941 masterwork "Citizen Kane" the best movie ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's but one problem with welcoming Alfred Hitchcock back to the public eye: He's never really been away. But even if you grant that the director is a man for all of cinema's seasons, what is it about him that makes this moment in time so indisputably his? Within little more than a month, two dramatic films with Hitchcock as the protagonist will have graced screens: HBO's "The Girl" looks at the director (played by Toby Jones) during the making of "The Birds," while Fox Searchlight's "Hitchcock" goes back a few years earlier to examine the creation of "Psycho" with Anthony Hopkins in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE
"Blackmail," a thriller directed by then-unknown filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock, made history as Britain's very first "talkie" in 1929. Now, more than 60 years later, the film is again making history: Charles Bennett, 91, has been signed to co-write the screenplay for a remake. The deal with 20th Century Fox makes Bennett the oldest screenwriter on assignment for a studio. It also brings Bennett's career full circle.
BOOKS
January 1, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
The collaboration of director Alfred Hitchcock and producer David O. Selznick forged such remarkable films as "Rebecca," "Spellbound" and "Notorious." Yet a more unlikely pairing would be difficult to find, even in the movie industry. The deliberate Hitchcock, whom Selznick would call "the slowest director we have had," told Life magazine to characterize him as "a fundamentally lazy man." Selznick, on the other hand, worked excessively, "ruled his studio . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Los Angeles Times
Polisse MPI, $24.98 Inspired by real child protection unit cases that French writer-director-actress Maïwenn either observed or researched, the docudrama follows a group of cops who investigate child abusers and molesters. The subject matter is bleak, but Maïwenn's approach to the material is smart and sensitive, showing how these officers, men and women, work diligently and carefully, trying to exact the truth about crimes when the victims often can't adequately explain what happened to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There are two Alfred Hitchcock biopics being released this fall. "Hitchcock," coming in November, is a big-screen affair, set during the filming of "Psycho," with Anthony Hopkins as the portly master of suspense, Helen Mirren as wife and consultant Alma Reville and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh. "The Girl", which premieres Saturday on HBO, focuses on the relationship between Hitchcock and actress Tippi Hedren during the making of "The Birds" and "Marnie. " It stars Toby Jones, Imelda Staunton and Sienna Miller, as Hitch, Alma and Tippi, with Cape Town, South Africa, in the role of Hollywood, U.S.A.
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