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Alfredo Harp Helu

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
In the never-ending stream of revelations concerning the sometimes astonishing events that shook Mexico in 1994, we must now add this week's news about the ransom paid last year for the country's best-known kidnaping victim, banker Alfredo Harp Helu.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
In the never-ending stream of revelations concerning the sometimes astonishing events that shook Mexico in 1994, we must now add this week's news about the ransom paid last year for the country's best-known kidnaping victim, banker Alfredo Harp Helu.
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BUSINESS
June 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Banamex Official's Kidnapers Issue Ultimatum: In a message delivered to the Mexican news media Tuesday, the abductors said they would kill Alfredo Harp Helu, chairman of Grupo Financiero Banamex-Accival, within three days unless a ransom was paid. Harp was kidnaped three months ago near Mexico City. Included in the package sent to the media was a handwritten letter from Harp saying he was "pained and saddened" by the failure of his family and the bank to pay the ransom.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
Only minutes before a deadline, the family of one of Mexico's richest men went on nationwide television and agreed to pay a huge ransom to free him from kidnapers. The announcement on the television program "24 Hours"--as demanded by the kidnapers--came just before the 11:30 p.m. Thursday deadline they had set to kill Alfredo Harp Helu, 50, president of Mexico's largest financial company. He was kidnaped March 14.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
Only minutes before a deadline, the family of one of Mexico's richest men went on nationwide television and agreed to pay a huge ransom to free him from kidnapers. The announcement on the television program "24 Hours"--as demanded by the kidnapers--came just before the 11:30 p.m. Thursday deadline they had set to kill Alfredo Harp Helu, 50, president of Mexico's largest financial company. He was kidnaped March 14.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The apparent kidnaping of the chairman of Mexico's largest bank caused Mexican stock prices--which have been sliding since the New Year's Day rebellion in Southern Mexico--to tumble again Tuesday as investors questioned the nation's potential as a model for Third World reform.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
A leading Mexican banker abducted more than three months ago was released by his kidnapers after his family paid a cash ransom of about $30 million. Alfredo Harp Helu, 50, president and a major stockholder in the banking-financial firm of Banamex-Accival, was freed on the south side of Mexico City. "I don't have any details. But, yes, he has been freed and he is safe and sound," a highly placed law enforcement source said. Harp Helu was kidnaped March 14. The kidnapers have not been identified.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994
MEXICAN STOCKS * The market staged a modest rally Wednesday as kidnapers released banker Alfredo Harp Helu. The Bolsa index gained 38.20 points to 2,270.93. Harp, head of Banamex-Accival, was freed for a $30-million ransom. For now, investors are happier about his release than they are worried about the huge ransom, which could encourage more abductions.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | Associated Press
Kidnapers of financier Alfredo Harp Helu vowed in a published letter Thursday to execute the president of Mexico's biggest bank if a ransom is not paid quickly. "If you don't pay the ransom you will know you have made a mistake . . . when the body is in front of you," said the typed letter addressed to the board of directors of Banco Nacional de Mexico, known as Banamex. The letter did not say how much ransom was being demanded.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The director of the Mexico Stock Exchange and its operations chief, who has been in a coma since attempting suicide, have resigned after the disappearance of $7 million through what exchange officials have called "administrative irrregularities." The stock exchange, which announced the resignations Wednesday, has issued statements reassuring investors and rejecting persistent suggestions of fraud.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Banamex Official's Kidnapers Issue Ultimatum: In a message delivered to the Mexican news media Tuesday, the abductors said they would kill Alfredo Harp Helu, chairman of Grupo Financiero Banamex-Accival, within three days unless a ransom was paid. Harp was kidnaped three months ago near Mexico City. Included in the package sent to the media was a handwritten letter from Harp saying he was "pained and saddened" by the failure of his family and the bank to pay the ransom.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The apparent kidnaping of the chairman of Mexico's largest bank caused Mexican stock prices--which have been sliding since the New Year's Day rebellion in Southern Mexico--to tumble again Tuesday as investors questioned the nation's potential as a model for Third World reform.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1994 | From Reuters
The abduction Monday of a second wealthy Mexican in six weeks sent shivers through the Mexican business community Monday and deflated an early stock rally triggered by a stronger peso. The Bolsa index closed down 18.23 points at 2,191.08 after falling back from a session high of 2,289.60 points. The narrower INMEX index also closed lower, but advancing shares outnumbered declines 40 to 38 in the wider market.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official disclosures that Mexico's new ultra-leftist rebels are "urban terrorists" who may have financed an arsenal of modern assault weapons with tens of millions of dollars from a kidnapping ransom, the Mexican government wrestled Tuesday with a new setback in its effort to bring peace to the impoverished countryside.
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