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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Bulgarian-born opera singer Nicolai Ghiaurov, one of the great basses of the post-World War II era who specialized in late 19th century works and did wonders with Russian roles, died Wednesday in central Italy. He was 74. Ghiaurov suffered a fatal heart attack at a private clinic near his home in the town of Modena, said Dr. Pasquale Maglieri of the Hesperia Hospital clinic. The singer had been in the facility almost three weeks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | DAVID STEVENS, Stevens writes for the International Herald Tribune in Paris. and
After years of strife over the new Opera Bastille and a fair amount of ridicule over its exterior appearance--its eight-story bulk in glass, steel and off-white stone likened by some to a huge, immobile ship and by others to a rhinoceros in a bathtub--it turns out that the Paris press, despite some quibbles, rather likes the place.
SPORTS
July 25, 1992 | JIM MURRAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish and artistic temperament, as stormy as the second act of "Carmen," erupted at a news conference for the operatic portion of the Olympic opening ceremony. On hand to signal their presence in the Games and the release of a recording of their part in them were Spain's most celebrated divas and tenors, including the internationally renowned, Spanish-born Placido Domingo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Offenbach's "Les Contes d'Hoffmann" has seen better days at the Metropolitan Opera. Otto Schenk's crisply fanciful staging scheme of 1982, now entrusted to Lesley Koenig, has lost some of its original focus and momentum. Gunther Schneider-Siemssen's lavish, ultra-clever sets are beginning to show signs of wear. Sylvain Cambreling, the new conductor, paces Offenbach's score with momentum that often exhilarates but sometimes invites frenzy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Donizetti's should-be charming, must-be stylish "L'Elisir d'Amore" has returned to the War Memorial Opera House after a seven-year absence in a revival that honors a lazy, laissez-faire tradition. San Francisco has poured a flat new elixir into a shabby old bottle. When this production was first seen, 25 years ago, it represented the first independent effort here by an extraordinarily resourceful stage director named Lotfi Mansouri.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1993 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Christa Ludwig is singing goodby. The beloved mezzo-soprano from Berlin via Vienna, now 69, still has a brief date at the Metropolitan Opera, where she is to impersonate Fricka in "Die Walkure" on April 3. Her schedule beyond that still promises valedictories in Salzburg, Paris, London, Munich and, of course, Vienna. Saturday night at Carnegie Hall, however, she observed a particularly sentimental milestone: her last recital in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
When the San Diego Opera is good, it is very good indeed. Remember "Rusalka" just last month. When the San Diego Opera is bad, it's provincial. Try to forget the revival of "Lucia di Lammermoor," Donizetti's very Italian translation of Sir Walter Scott's very Scottish novel, which opened Saturday night at the Civic Theatre. This was a rather crass, possibly even cynical demonstration of easy, old-fashioned, laissez-faire opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Expo '92, scheduled to take place in Seville, Spain, from April 20 to Oct. 12, 1992, will mount six famous operatic works set in Seville. The six operas--Mozart's "Don Giovanni" and "Le Nozze di Figaro," Rossini's "Il Barbiere di Siviglia," Beethoven's "Fidelio," Verdi's "La Forza del Destino" and Donizetti's "La Favorita"--will be performed in Seville's new opera house, the Maestranza Theater, which will open in the spring of 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1993 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Jules Massenet's "Werther," written in 1892, is a fragile little opera. The libretto--a superficial gloss on Goethe's sorrowful novel, "Die Leiden des jungen Werthers"--is mired in mushy Germanic sentiment. The score adds layer upon delicate layer of gently perfumed Gallic gush. It is all terribly pretty, terribly sad and terribly romantic in its unabashedly bourgeois-intimate manner. Also a bit gooey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
When Sesto Bruscantini says, "If a singer lives in a sane manner and has a good technique, it is very difficult for the voice to give out," he ought to know. The Italian baritone, Don Alfonso in L.A. Music Center Opera's "Cosi fan Tutte," opening tonight in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, made his operatic debut in 1946.
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