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Algeria Elections

NEWS
December 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muslim fundamentalists Thursday began celebrating outside of polling places all over Algiers as early unofficial returns in some areas of the country showed them pulling ahead of Algeria's ruling National Liberation Front in the country's first free national elections since independence in 1962. Even as the polls closed in the city's teeming neighborhoods, members of the Islamic Salvation Front shouted "Allahu Akbar!" (God is Great!
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NEWS
July 4, 1989
Algerian legislators approved a law allowing opposition political parties, a move that will end the one-party rule existing in this North African state since its independence from France in 1962. Newspapers reported that 40 groups intend to form parties to challenge the political dominance of President Chadli Bendjedid's National Liberation Front. The law was passed after weeks of often-stormy debate.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Liamine Zeroual, battling an Islamic insurgency and economic woes, announced Friday that he will shorten his term and call an early election before March. Zeroual, 57, made his statement on nationwide television. He didn't give a date for his resignation, though presumably he will remain in office until a successor is elected. He was elected to the presidency in November 1995 for a five-year term.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Algeria on Friday proclaimed Liamine Zeroual, head of its military-backed government, the overwhelming winner of presidential elections. But his election, in a vote boycotted by most of his major opponents, only heightened pressure on the government to open dialogue with Islamic insurgents.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party formed this year to back Algerian President Liamine Zeroual trounced all rivals in municipal elections Friday as the regime cemented its plan to legitimize governing institutions to face an Islamic insurgency that has claimed more than 65,000 lives.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Algerian President Chadli Bendjedid announced Wednesday that the political reforms he promised to make in the wake of last week's anti-government riots will be put to a popular vote in two referendums starting next month. A three-point communique issued by Bendjedid's office said the first referendum, to be held Nov. 3, will ask Algerians to approve the appointment of a new premier who will be responsible before the People's National Assembly, Algeria's 295-seat Parliament.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | From Reuters
Dozens of people fainted or suffered slight injuries when thousands of expatriate Algerians crowded around their country's consulates in France on Saturday to vote in the Algerian presidential election, police said. The gates of the consulate at Nice on the Riviera were torn down, and riot police had to be called out in Marseilles, where about 8,000 people pressed into the narrow street outside the consulate.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
Algeria's presidential election was thrown into chaos Wednesday after six of the seven candidates announced they were withdrawing to protest fraud in early voting. The sole candidate left--Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who is widely believed to have the support of the military--said he would only accept the presidency if there was a high voter turnout and a large majority for him.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | JONATHAN C. RANDAL, THE WASHINGTON POST
Islamic fundamentalists ended a two-week general strike on Friday as they and the government backed away from further street violence of the kind that interrupted Algeria's experiment with multi-party democracy. Within hours of the announcement at Friday prayers by Abbasi Madani, leader of the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS), the removal of a water cannon, a bulldozer and hundreds of police from a key fundamentalist stronghold here showed an easing of tensions.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 7-year-old boy, his tiny head topped with a white skullcap, raised his reedy voice and exhorted the faithful to take over the country. As he screamed Allah's name, the voices of nearly 150,000 people in the stadium around him raised in song. Many began weeping. "No constitution," they sang. "No law. The only law is the law of God."
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