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January 19, 2002
So the 2,189th honoree on the Hollywood Walk of Fame doesn't want his star walked on ("In the Know," Jan. 14). If Muhammad Ali didn't want what the first 2,188 honorees got, they should not have made an exception for him. AL DAVIES Marina del Rey
April 11, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Touching the Wild" (PBS, Wednesday). "That deer was willing to see me as an individual, and he very clearly saw that I granted him his individuality," says naturalist Joe Hutto of the meeting that led to years spent becoming one with the mule deer of Wyoming. "I was not seeing something, I was seeing someone. " If any part of that sentence or this one -- "I don't mind going beyond science, and I try to walk a fine line between the science and the sentiment; this is about making contact with the wild" -- seems wrong to you, you will want to stay far from this lovely film, presented as an episode of "Nature," a companion to Hutto's book "Touching the Wild: Living With the Mule Deer of Deadman Gulch.
September 18, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Ken Norton Sr., a former heavyweight boxing champion who beat Muhammad Ali once - breaking his jaw - and fought him to two other extremely close decisions, died Wednesday at a care facility near Las Vegas. He was 70. Norton had been in poor health in recent years after a series of strokes, but the congestive heart failure he suffered Wednesday stunned those close to him, "like a sucker punch to us all," said Norton's close friend from Orange County, Patrick Tenore Sr. One of Norton's four children, former UCLA and NFL linebacker Ken Norton Jr., who is now a Seattle Seahawks assistant coach, confirmed his father's death to the Associated Press.
April 11, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Another spring, another college commencement speaker contoversy . In 1990, students at Wellesley College objected to First Lady Barbara Bush , who they felt was not sufficiently feminist as she had dropped out of Smith College in 1944 to get married. In 2006, Muslim students at Nova Southeastern University in Florida objected to author Salman Rushdie because they found parts of his novel “The Satanic Verses” offensive - never mind that he had been tormented for almost a decade by an edict from the religious leader of Iran calling for his execution.
January 31, 1992
Your article titled "Bright Angles" (Dianne Klein column, View, Jan. 7) addressed the topic of how a mother not only copes with a special child but finds "that lining" to keep the rain from falling all the time. Nancy Torbitt has another special child besides A.T. and I am sure that she knows it. It adds another dimension that I have observed as a neighbor and which I am sure others who know the Torbitts have also noticed. I first met Ali as a parent volunteer on a whale watching field trip for my son Michael's third-grade class.
May 5, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal judge ordered a Yemeni man released from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after seven years' detention. U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler said the U.S. should take all necessary diplomatic steps to release Alla Ali Bin Ali Ahmed. He was picked up seven years ago by Pakistani forces in a prayer house that the government said was run by a high-ranking Al Qaeda operative. The judge gave the government until June 15 to report on the status of his release.
October 12, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The barber's mirror hangs on tree limbs lashed together to make a vanity. His customers wait their turns sitting on cinder blocks. His floor is not black-and-white checkerboard linoleum, but a patch of dirt. A tarp suspended by branches keeps his clients from getting drenched during the monsoons. Call it a shave and a haircut, two bits ? Pakistani style. In this country, the barber, the masseuse, the moneychanger and the shoemaker often ply their trades wherever their bare, calloused feet take them.
December 16, 2001
I portrayed a ringside photographer in "Ali" and would like to point out that not once during the 20 days I was on set did Will Smith have a double do any of his boxing or take a punch for him ("A Fight That Went the Full 15 Rounds," by Patrick Goldstein, Dec. 9). Smith also taped his hands before boxing each day in a ritual to help him get into character, and his stamina was inspiring. Working on "Ali," while grueling, was a unique experience. I had ample time to observe the principals and get to know many of them, and discovered that they are typically gracious and not at all arrogant.
June 3, 1990 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a reporter for the San Diego edition of The Times.
EVERYBODY IN LA JOLLA knew the Brodericks. Daniel T. Broderick III and his wife, Betty, seemed to have a classic society-page marriage. Dan was a celebrity in local legal circles. Armed with degrees from both Harvard Law School and Cornell School of Medicine, the prominent malpractice attorney was aggressive, persuasive and cunning--a $1-million-a-year lawyer at the top of his game.
September 1, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
Hundreds of Shiite Muslim pilgrims participating in an annual religious commemoration in northern Baghdad were killed Wednesday in a stampede on a bridge apparently triggered by fears of an insurgent attack and exacerbated by tight security restrictions. At least 845 pilgrims, most of them women, children and the elderly, died. The Ministry of Health said the toll could rise to 1,000 or more. It was the highest death toll in any single incident in Iraq since well before the 2003 U.S.
April 8, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Shot putter Amir Ali Patterson of Crespi failed on Tuesday to convince a judge to issue an injunction that would have allowed him to compete for the Celts this season, ending his high school career. Patterson had run out of athletic eligibility but sought a hardship waiver from the Southern Section. It was denied. He finished second last season at the state championships and has signed with UCLA.  
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Ali Ahmad Razihi, accused of being a former bodyguard to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, hopes someday to leave the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay and return to Yemen, where he plans to marry and help his family in their fruit and vegetable farm. At a hearing Thursday to decide whether he should get his wish, U.S. military lawyers said they couldn't say with certainty whether he remained a threat to this country. Razihi appeared at the Pentagon's latest Periodic Review Board hearing, becoming only the third Guantanamo detainee to do so. The hearings, begun by the Obama administration as a way to gradually empty and close the prison in Cuba, are giving half of the roughly 150 prisoners a chance to be moved to a list of detainees eligible for release.
January 31, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
The high school track and field career for UCLA-bound shot putter Amir Ali Patterson of Encino Crespi is over. The second-place finisher in last year's state championships as a junior was ruled ineligible for this season because he had run out of sports eligibility. It was discovered that that he had started attending another school in ninth grade, then went back to eighth grade. That started his eight semesters of high school sports eligibility. Athletic Director Russell White said Patterson filed a hardship waiver appeal but it was denied.
January 24, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
  Shot putter Amir Ali Patterson of Encino Crespi has committed to UCLA. Patterson is expected to be one of the top track and field performers in the state this spring. He finished second at the state championships last season as a junior. Nebraska also was a contender in the recruiting battle. "I was treated with respect and dignity and had the chance to be invited to visit some amazing programs hosted by an impressive list of universities and coaches," Patterson said in an email statement.
January 21, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Legendary boxer Muhammad Ali is having a TV renaissance. HBO last year premiered "Muhammad Ali's Greatest Fight," a docudrama centered on the legal battle in 1967 that erupted when the heavyweight champion and newly converted Muslim refused to be drafted into the Vietnam War and was stripped of his title. That film, directed by Stephen Frears, focused primarlily on the U.S. Supreme Court taking up the case. Ali is seen in a few film clips but is largely absent from the film. But the athlete is front and center in "The Trials of Muhammad Ail," a documentary that will premiere April 14 on PBS' "Independent Lens.
January 12, 2014 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: Saturday's Art of Elysium "Heaven" Gala brought together a galaxy of stars on the eve of the Golden Globe Awards.  Designed by songwriter Linda Perry, according to her vision of heaven, the black-tie gala benefited Elysium organization and honored comedian Hayes MacArthur and actress Ali Larter of “Heroes” and “Final Destination.” The crowd: Art of Elysium, which brings the creative arts to hospitalized children, is...
More than 120 investigators and prosecutors looking into workers' compensation fraud in Southern California served search warrants Wednesday at 31 sites, including the homes and offices of a string of doctors and lawyers suspected of paying illicit kickbacks. The investigation is one of several major workers' compensation fraud probes launched by authorities in the region since the beginning of last year.
December 3, 1996
When Muhammad Ali arrived in Watts to attend a photo exhibit, the usual mob of photographers huddled around him. But for once, they took pictures of his photographer: Howard Bingham. "Look this way, Howard!" they shouted. Bingham, for more then 30 years the personal photographer of "the Greatest," was being honored at the premiere of his exhibition, "A 30-Year Journey." The display of his pictures of Ali runs daily through Feb. 28 at the Watts Labor Community Action Committee Center, 10950 S.
November 6, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - When is a pirate not a pirate? A federal court may provide an answer in a trial that opened in Washington this week of a Somali official who helped win release of a hijacked Danish cargo ship and crew for $1.7 million ransom, but who played no part in seizing the vessel or holding it for 71 days. U.S. courts have convicted dozens of Somali pirates in recent years, part of a vast multinational effort that has helped curtail the rampant hijacking of oil tankers, freighters, sailboats and other ships off the Horn of Africa.
November 1, 2013 | By Scott Collins
The man behind Borat is getting ready to make sexy time with FX. Sacha Baron Cohen, British star of "Borat" and "Da Ali G Show," has clinched a first-look deal with the production arm of the cable network through his company Four by Two, FX announced Friday.  In addition, FXX - the sister network of FX - will start airing "Ali G: Rezurection," which includes every episode of the popular comedy series along with new episodes and some material never...
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