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October 24, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Anticipating election day, Americans need to examine the pieces of the puzzle to see how they fit together. They might first look at a commander in chief without much personal credibility. Next, they could ponder a military without much institutional credibility. Finally, they must factor in the presidential election. The most startling news of last week was the apparent miscommunication about the precise sequence of events on Oct. 12, the day the U.S. warship Cole was blasted. If the ship was bombed when it first pulled into port at Aden, then responsibility for the loss of 17 sailors would go right to the top of the chain of command--to those who decided, as a matter of international power politics, to send the Cole to terrorist-teeming Yemen.
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NATIONAL
November 6, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - When is a pirate not a pirate? A federal court may provide an answer in a trial that opened in Washington this week of a Somali official who helped win release of a hijacked Danish cargo ship and crew for $1.7 million ransom, but who played no part in seizing the vessel or holding it for 71 days. U.S. courts have convicted dozens of Somali pirates in recent years, part of a vast multinational effort that has helped curtail the rampant hijacking of oil tankers, freighters, sailboats and other ships off the Horn of Africa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Anticipating election day, Americans need to examine the pieces of the puzzle to see how they fit together. They might first look at a commander in chief without much personal credibility. Next, they could ponder a military without much institutional credibility. Finally, they must factor in the presidential election. The most startling news of last week was the apparent miscommunication about the precise sequence of events on Oct. 12, the day the U.S. warship Cole was blasted. If the ship was bombed when it first pulled into port at Aden, then responsibility for the loss of 17 sailors would go right to the top of the chain of command--to those who decided, as a matter of international power politics, to send the Cole to terrorist-teeming Yemen.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Anticipating election day, Americans need to examine the pieces of the puzzle to see how they fit together. They might first look at a commander in chief without much personal credibility. Next, they could ponder a military without much institutional credibility. Finally, they must factor in the presidential election. The most startling news of last week was the apparent miscommunication about the precise sequence of events on Oct. 12, the day the U.S. warship Cole was blasted. If the ship was bombed when it first pulled into port at Aden, then responsibility for the loss of 17 sailors would go right to the top of the chain of command--to those who decided, as a matter of international power politics, to send the Cole to terrorist-teeming Yemen.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former U.S. Army sergeant charged in the 1998 bombings of two American embassies in Africa pleaded guilty Friday and said Saudi militant Osama bin Laden examined a photograph of the embassy in Kenya and pointed to the spot where a truck bomb could do the most damage. Ali Mohamed, a 48-year-old Egyptian-born U.S. citizen, told the court that in late 1993, four years after leaving the military, he was asked by Bin Laden to conduct surveillance of U.S.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
The warlord who controls northern Mogadishu on Saturday welcomed a proposal to send up to 30,000 American troops to Somalia to help relief workers fight the nation's famine. Ali Mahdi Mohamed approved the plan one day after his archenemy, the warlord who controls southern Mogadishu, gave it his blessing.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - When is a pirate not a pirate? A federal court may provide an answer in a trial that opened in Washington this week of a Somali official who helped win release of a hijacked Danish cargo ship and crew for $1.7 million ransom, but who played no part in seizing the vessel or holding it for 71 days. U.S. courts have convicted dozens of Somali pirates in recent years, part of a vast multinational effort that has helped curtail the rampant hijacking of oil tankers, freighters, sailboats and other ships off the Horn of Africa.
WORLD
September 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Mortar rounds and gunfire killed 30 people in Somalia's capital as insurgents battled government forces and their Ethiopian allies. "There is blood everywhere and human flesh on the walls," said Abshir Mohamed Ali, a shop owner at Mogadishu's Bakara market. The fighting began after Islamic insurgents fired mortar rounds at the main airport and at the presidential palace, said Ali Mohamed Siyad, who chairs a market traders' group. Government forces and their allies retaliated.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal jury in New York ended its third full day of deliberations in the case against four Osama bin Laden followers charged in a plot to kill Americans that included the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Bin Laden is believed to be the mastermind behind the Nairobi and Dar es Salaam bombings that killed 224 people. Before leaving for the day, jurors asked for evidence involving Ali Mohamed, a former U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Militiamen opposed to Somali warlord Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid claim to have captured a key airport, cutting the supply line to Aidid's troops in Mogadishu. Forces loyal to rival warlord Ali Mahdi Mohamed captured the airport at Balidogle, west of the capital, Ali Mahdi's radio reported. Witnesses said at least eight people were killed and more than 19 wounded during the 90-minute battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Anticipating election day, Americans need to examine the pieces of the puzzle to see how they fit together. They might first look at a commander in chief without much personal credibility. Next, they could ponder a military without much institutional credibility. Finally, they must factor in the presidential election. The most startling news of last week was the apparent miscommunication about the precise sequence of events on Oct. 12, the day the U.S. warship Cole was blasted. If the ship was bombed when it first pulled into port at Aden, then responsibility for the loss of 17 sailors would go right to the top of the chain of command--to those who decided, as a matter of international power politics, to send the Cole to terrorist-teeming Yemen.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former U.S. Army sergeant charged in the 1998 bombings of two American embassies in Africa pleaded guilty Friday and said Saudi militant Osama bin Laden examined a photograph of the embassy in Kenya and pointed to the spot where a truck bomb could do the most damage. Ali Mohamed, a 48-year-old Egyptian-born U.S. citizen, told the court that in late 1993, four years after leaving the military, he was asked by Bin Laden to conduct surveillance of U.S.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
The warlord who controls northern Mogadishu on Saturday welcomed a proposal to send up to 30,000 American troops to Somalia to help relief workers fight the nation's famine. Ali Mahdi Mohamed approved the plan one day after his archenemy, the warlord who controls southern Mogadishu, gave it his blessing.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 13 people were killed and 28 wounded in the first clan battle involving Somali faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid's forces since he took over after the death of his father, Mohammed Farah Aidid, at the start of the month. Witnesses said militiamen loyal to Aidid and his archenemy, north Mogadishu faction leader Ali Mahdi Mohamed, fought in a village about 30 miles southwest of the capital.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The International Red Cross pulled its expatriate staff out of northern Mogadishu after gunmen robbed its office there of $180,000. An Red Cross statement said two of its officials were held at gunpoint during the robbery Friday. It said staff in the northern sector of the city, which is dominated politically by the faction led by Ali Mahdi Mohamed, had been threatened with guns in a series of incidents in the last few weeks.
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