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Alice Munro

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October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Alice Munro is the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in literature . The Canadian author was lauded for being "master of the short story" by Peter Englund, permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy. Munro, 82, is the rare author who has made a career of crafting short fiction instead of novels. "I can't do it yet. And believe me, I'm always trying. Between every book I think, 'Well now, it's time to get down to the serious stuff.' Sometimes I look at novels and see how short people can make them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the new movie "Hateship Loveship," Kristen Wiig's character, an introverted, thirtysomething housekeeper named Johannna practices kissing herself in the mirror. It's a moment of loneliness that Wiig and director Liza Johnson envisioned as a sad beat in the film. But at a screening last September at the Toronto International Film Festival, Wiig was shocked when audiences laughed at the scene. "I'm so surprised that comes across as funny," she said in a recent interview at a Los Feliz cafe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Alice Munro, who won the Nobel Prize for literature Thursday , is seen as a titan of the short story, thanks to collections including “Dance of the Happy Shades” and “The Beggar Maid.” She also has had an occasional - and recent--influence on film. Munro's 2001 story “Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage” was the basis of this year's Toronto International Film Festival debut “Hateship Loveship,” acquired by IFC for a likely release next year. The film features a personality one wouldn't necessarily associate with Munro or the Nobel: Kristen Wiig, who marks her dramatic debut in the lo-fi indie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
After accepting the Trillium Book Award in Toronto on Tuesday night for her story collection "Dear Life," Canadian writer Alice Munro sat down for a quick interview with the National Post, and revealed some surprising news: Her decision to retire from writing. "[Winning the award was] a little more special in that I'm probably not going to write anymore. And, so, it's nice to go out with a bang," Munro, who is 81, told interviewer Mark Medley. "I think you do get to a stage where you sort of think about your life in a different way. And perhaps, when you're my age, you don't wish to be alone as much as a writer has to be. It's like, at the wrong end of life, sort of becoming very sociable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Alice Munro, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday, lives a quiet life in a small town in Ontario, Canada. When the Los Angeles Times' Susan Salter Reynolds visited her in 2006, she explained that she was a "weird" teenager. "I was already deep into being a writer. I went to a dance. Nobody danced with me. This bewildered and annoyed me. I never went to a dance again. " Instead of going to dances, Munro honed her craft, publishing more than a dozen books, most collections of short fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Dear Life Stories Alice Munro Knopf: 336 pp., $26.95 Alice Munro's short stories are often said to resemble novels. It's not just the density of life she crams into them - it's also their length. Inching into novella territory, the long title stories of her last three collections, "Runaway" (2004), "The View from Castle Rock" (2006) and "Too Much Happiness" (2009), explored the exurbs of the short story form. The casually impeccable stories in her latest collection, "Dear Life," are somewhat more traditional in that they are largely focused on a defining episode of a character's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The Canadian writer Alice Munro just wasn't new and exciting enough. Not in the eyes of the editors at Alfred A. Knopf who rejected her work in the 1960s and '70s. “There's no question that the lady can write but it's also clear she is primarily a short story writer, ” wrote Knopf editor Judith Jones in 1971. Earlier this month, Munro won the Nobel Prize in literature . This week, the Harry Ransom Center, a library and archive at the University of Texas at Austin, showed Munro's rejections letters to a reporter at the Daily Texan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Alice Munro was my teacher. No, I've never actually met the Canadian writer, who was enshrined Thursday as a Nobel laureate for literature. I mean she was my "teacher" in that way we writers think about the great authors whose published works instruct us in what the art can be. Like many other writers, I turned to Munro for help with a certain essential element of the craft of literary fiction. She taught me to see the glories of the everyday, the epic inside the ordinary. An Alice Munro story is the antithesis of melodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
2013 was a very good year for writers with many years behind them. When she was 81 years old, author Alice Munro published her 16th short story collection, "Dear Life," and told Canadian news outlets that she was done with writing. At 82, after she won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature, Munro admitted she might not be ready to quit after all. "I have promised to retire but now and then I get an idea," she told the Wall Street Journal. Writing is an art that, with persistent ideas and enduring talent, can be carried on for a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Thirty boxes of stuff -- the kind of thing a frustrated spouse might suggest be cleared out of the garage -- is being donated to the L.A. Public Library, which has accepted the lot with much enthusiasm. The boxes belong to Dr. Melvin Schrier, a retired optometrist who now lives in Palos Verdes. Schrier was born in Brooklyn and practiced on Park Avenue in Manhattan; when he started going out on the town, he began saving souvenirs. That was back in 1944, and he kept at it for the next sixty-some years, noting the date on each item.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The Canadian writer Alice Munro just wasn't new and exciting enough. Not in the eyes of the editors at Alfred A. Knopf who rejected her work in the 1960s and '70s. “There's no question that the lady can write but it's also clear she is primarily a short story writer, ” wrote Knopf editor Judith Jones in 1971. Earlier this month, Munro won the Nobel Prize in literature . This week, the Harry Ransom Center, a library and archive at the University of Texas at Austin, showed Munro's rejections letters to a reporter at the Daily Texan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
Before winning the Nobel Prize in Literature, Canadian short story master Alice Munro announced her retirement in an interview with Mark Medley of Canada's National Post. “When you're my age,” Munro said in June , “you don't wish to be alone as much as a writer has to be. It's like, at the wrong end of life, sort of becoming very sociable. A season, and a Nobel prize win , later, Munro may have changed her mind. “Every day I have mixed messages to myself over whether I will retire,” Munro told the Wall Street Journal, in one of her first interviews since her big win . “I have promised to retire but now and then I get an idea.” Munro's ideas famously arrive to her via her experiences in  small-town  southern Ontario, most notably her hometown Wingham, which is home to only 3,000 people but has enough stories for the whole world to take notice.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Alice Munro may not, as Carolyn Kellogg reported Sunday , be going to Stockholm in December to pick up her Nobel Prize in literature (“Her health is simply not good enough,” Swedish Academy permanent secretary Peter Englund explained. “All involved, including Mrs. Munro herself, regret this”). But she remains available in other ways. In the wake of the Nobel announcement, the New Yorker, where she has published many stories over the past three and a half decades, allowed free access to a dozen of her pieces on its website; this week, the magazine reprints her story “The Bear Came Over the Mountain,” which first appeared in December 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Alice Munro, who won the Nobel Prize for literature Thursday , is seen as a titan of the short story, thanks to collections including “Dance of the Happy Shades” and “The Beggar Maid.” She also has had an occasional - and recent--influence on film. Munro's 2001 story “Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage” was the basis of this year's Toronto International Film Festival debut “Hateship Loveship,” acquired by IFC for a likely release next year. The film features a personality one wouldn't necessarily associate with Munro or the Nobel: Kristen Wiig, who marks her dramatic debut in the lo-fi indie.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | KATE PHILLIPS
A Canadian writer, Munro has been publishing stories for almost 30 years; they have earned her massive acclaim. This new collection offers both a fine testament to the stories that have made Munro's reputation and a delightful opportunity for the reader to journey at length in Munro's fictional territory. Munro is above all else a realist. She seeks to evoke the mysteries of real life and she succeeds brilliantly. The important people in Munro's fiction are women.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When the Nobel Prize in Literature was announced Thursday morning, literary Twitter flowed in three general veins: congratulations for the much-admired Alice Munro, the new Nobel laureate; wry commentary on how the prize is talked about in Western media outlets; and warm jokes, including the inevitable twerking. The applause came from many quarters: Bestselling novelist @jodipicoult : Love, love, LOVE that #AliceMunro won the #Nobel. Booker Prize-winning novelist @SalmanRushdie : Many congrats to Alice Munro.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Alice Munro, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday, lives a quiet life in a small town in Ontario, Canada. When the Los Angeles Times' Susan Salter Reynolds visited her in 2006, she explained that she was a "weird" teenager. "I was already deep into being a writer. I went to a dance. Nobody danced with me. This bewildered and annoyed me. I never went to a dance again. " Instead of going to dances, Munro honed her craft, publishing more than a dozen books, most collections of short fiction.
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