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Alice

NEWS
December 29, 1985
Natalie Gregory was great in "Alice in Wonderland." Roddy McDowall was the best supporting actor though he had very few lines. Carolyn J. Ranslem, Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2008 | Bob Baker, Special to The Times
Memo to: Tyler Perry Re: "The Family That Preys" Dude, what made you refuse to screen your film for critics before it opened Friday? I'm betting you would have received an earful of praise for your writing and directing. Praise for the sweet relationship between Alfre Woodard and Kathy Bates as mothers occasionally shamed by their children. Praise for making venality your dominant theme without falling into the ditch of soap opera. Praise for constructing characters whose yearning for more rings true.
FOOD
March 4, 1998
Today was a very happy day for me after reading Ruth Reichl's personal story, "Go Ask Alice" (Feb. 25). I was swept into someone else's life. It felt magical. Ms. Reichl's family history shows us how very much we need each other through the good times and the bad times. I only wish that I, too, could have dined with Aunt Birdie and Alice. NANCY TORRECILLAS Beverly Hills Ruth Reichl's article, "Go Ask Alice," was wonderful. The storytelling reminded me of M.F.K. Fisher (one of my favorite authors)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
To say that Sophie Lellouche, writer-director of the French rom-com "Paris-Manhattan," was inspired by the films of Woody Allen is not to suggest that her movie is inspired. A wan homage to l'oeuvre de Woody , the feature siphons off bits of "Play It Again, Sam," "Hannah and Her Sisters" and "Manhattan Murder Mystery" in its underwhelming tale of a thirtysomething Parisian's search for Mr. Right. For pharmacist Alice (Alice Taglioni), the search is far from urgent; why bother when she's already found the perfect guy in Allen?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010
"Alice in Wonderland" Alice returns to the whimsical world she first encountered as a young girl, to find her true destiny and to end the Red Queen's reign of terror. "Brooklyn's Finest" In the course of one chaotic week, the lives of three conflicted New York City police officers are dramatically transformed by their involvement in a massive drug operation. "Liverpool" A merchant sailor returns to his home in Tierra del Fuego after spending most of his life at sea. "Ran" A reissue of the 1985 Akira Kurosawa film about a warlord and his three sons, who find themselves struggling with greed and betrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"In my book, it's called 'Alice in Wonderland,' " a young audience member announced as Robin Scott's new play "Alice in Numberland" began at the California Museum of Science and Industry. Faithful to Carroll's classic and to his interest in numbers (he taught mathematics), Scott's play is a clever take-off aimed at demystifying math for elementary school-age children.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Leave it to the French to come up with a picture in which the bigamist is a woman instead of a man. Alice (Miou-Miou), the busy heroine of "My Other 'Husband' " (Cineplex), isn't technically a bigamist. That's because the man (Eddy Mitchell) who has fathered two of her children (Ingrid Lurienne, Vincent Barazzoni) and with whom she spends half of her time in the Normandy resort of Trouville doesn't believe in marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
After riding her trusty lavender Cannondale 10-speed from San Francisco to Los Angeles for the 2008 AIDS Ride, Fabiola Sanchez thought CicLAvia would be a breeze. She and her two children drove to Union Station from their home in Norwalk and started west before her tire blew out in front of the LAPD headquarters on 1st Street. "I went from one station to another," she joked, after trying two repair stands before ending up at DTLA Bikes store on Broadway. Lines of bicycles and their owners filled the shop's aisles where overwhelmed employees did their best to keep everyone moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The beauty of a well-told fable is typically in its airy brevity, with a moral sharp and bittersweet. Ramaa Mosley's feature debut, "The Brass Teapot," has Aesopian pretensions with its supernatural-themed story about the titular vessel's darkly magical effect on the lives of a young, financially strapped married couple, played by Juno Temple and Michael Angarano. But the conceit - the teapot fills with money when harm is inflicted in its presence - is treated less like a starting-off point for something wise to say about societal masochism than an opportunity to indulge in weakly cynical jokes and aggressively ouch-y humor.
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