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Alice

FOOD
March 4, 1998
Today was a very happy day for me after reading Ruth Reichl's personal story, "Go Ask Alice" (Feb. 25). I was swept into someone else's life. It felt magical. Ms. Reichl's family history shows us how very much we need each other through the good times and the bad times. I only wish that I, too, could have dined with Aunt Birdie and Alice. NANCY TORRECILLAS Beverly Hills Ruth Reichl's article, "Go Ask Alice," was wonderful. The storytelling reminded me of M.F.K. Fisher (one of my favorite authors)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010
"Alice in Wonderland" Alice returns to the whimsical world she first encountered as a young girl, to find her true destiny and to end the Red Queen's reign of terror. "Brooklyn's Finest" In the course of one chaotic week, the lives of three conflicted New York City police officers are dramatically transformed by their involvement in a massive drug operation. "Liverpool" A merchant sailor returns to his home in Tierra del Fuego after spending most of his life at sea. "Ran" A reissue of the 1985 Akira Kurosawa film about a warlord and his three sons, who find themselves struggling with greed and betrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
All dressed up with cool places to go, the pretty young things of "Lotus Eaters" are very rich and extravagantly bored. Alexandra McGuinness' first feature isn't quite as aimless as the millennial jet-setters it portrays, but it's at least as good-looking and stylish. And even though the handsome black-and-white lensing is no substitute for a compelling story, it helps, infusing the skin-deep sketches of emotional enervation with aesthetic energy - for a while. The movie's London clique partake of the usual sex, drugs and clubbing, the bathtubs full of bubbly, and, of course, accouter their pet lemurs with jeweled collars.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"In my book, it's called 'Alice in Wonderland,' " a young audience member announced as Robin Scott's new play "Alice in Numberland" began at the California Museum of Science and Industry. Faithful to Carroll's classic and to his interest in numbers (he taught mathematics), Scott's play is a clever take-off aimed at demystifying math for elementary school-age children.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2001 | ESTHER DYSON
I am spending most of my holiday season handling--reading, deleting, answering--about 3,500 e-mails, and right now I am about halfway through. As I read all these e-mails, I am thinking of lots of advice for the writers. Of course, I write from the position of someone who already has broken one of the cardinal tenets of e-mail: Answer your mail. So please take this column in the spirit intended: Someone far from perfect is trying to pass along some helpful advice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Literate, intelligent and a model of accomplished European filmmaking, "Unforgivable" showcases the kind of emotional complexity that is all but gone from the screen these days. The interplay between its characters is so intricate that the very nature of the film seems to change, more than once, as we watch it. Directed byFrance'sveteran André Téchiné and co-written by him from a novel by Philippe Dijan, "Unforgivable" starts as an adult romance but quickly becomes a thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The Aussie import "Wish You Were Here" offers a distinctive, highly effective take on the vacation-from-hell thriller. First-time director Kieran Darcy-Smith, working from a powerful script he wrote with wife - and the film's co-star - Felicity Price, so consistently tightens the screws on the unfolding events you can practically hear the irrevocable twists. The story, told largely in the present but with slowly revealing, well-structured flashbacks, outwardly involves the disappearance of a Sydney, Australia, businessman, Jeremy (Antony Starr)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1995
Q: What would happen to a man who fell into a hole through the center of the Earth? A: Assuming he was not burned to a crisp by the intense heat or crushed by the great pressure, and that there was no friction in the hole, he would oscillate back and forth through the center of the Earth like a pendulum with a period of 42 minutes. That is, 42 minutes after entering the hole, he would emerge on the opposite side of the Earth, and 42 minutes later, he would be back where he started.
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