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Alice

ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Literate, intelligent and a model of accomplished European filmmaking, "Unforgivable" showcases the kind of emotional complexity that is all but gone from the screen these days. The interplay between its characters is so intricate that the very nature of the film seems to change, more than once, as we watch it. Directed byFrance'sveteran André Téchiné and co-written by him from a novel by Philippe Dijan, "Unforgivable" starts as an adult romance but quickly becomes a thriller.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The Aussie import "Wish You Were Here" offers a distinctive, highly effective take on the vacation-from-hell thriller. First-time director Kieran Darcy-Smith, working from a powerful script he wrote with wife - and the film's co-star - Felicity Price, so consistently tightens the screws on the unfolding events you can practically hear the irrevocable twists. The story, told largely in the present but with slowly revealing, well-structured flashbacks, outwardly involves the disappearance of a Sydney, Australia, businessman, Jeremy (Antony Starr)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
When screenwriter Darren Lemke first proposed the idea of contemporizing the Jack and the Beanstalk fairy tale with CG technology, it was 2005. Tim Burton had not yet jumped into the rabbit hole with "Alice in Wonderland. " Amanda Seyfried had yet to don the cape for "Red Riding Hood. " Snow White had no Huntsman. But due to development delays and changing technology, Warner Bros. and its New Line division didn't start production on "Jack the Giant Slayer" until early 2011. By that time, Disney's PG-rated "Alice" had earned more than $1 billion at the box office and the once-novel idea for "Jack" had some huge expectations to fulfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1995
Q: What would happen to a man who fell into a hole through the center of the Earth? A: Assuming he was not burned to a crisp by the intense heat or crushed by the great pressure, and that there was no friction in the hole, he would oscillate back and forth through the center of the Earth like a pendulum with a period of 42 minutes. That is, 42 minutes after entering the hole, he would emerge on the opposite side of the Earth, and 42 minutes later, he would be back where he started.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992
The proposed golf club in Big Tujunga Wash is a matter of open space and the right for nature to exist versus short-term gain for a few people. People have the right to make money but not at the expense of rare species and the unique environment. My wife Alice and I wanted to get away from the over-built-up, man-made urban concrete, pollution-infested habitat. Alice and I take our two children, Amy and Becky, to the wash to walk and study nature. I like the character of our community now. My family believes in the interdependent web of all living things.
OPINION
June 29, 2007
Re "Reel life was his real love," Column One, June 27 It has been 27 years since I last sat in Jim Hosney's classroom, listened to the whirl of a 35-millimeter projector in his apartment or heard that laugh, but time has diminished neither my fondness nor gratitude. While my vocations are law and politics rather than film, the lessons learned from this master permeate much of my work. One of the greatest testaments to Hosney is that my legal briefs, press releases and speeches often contain references to such decidedly nontraditional sources as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Rashomon."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1993 | Steve Hochman
And the "Lollapalooza '93" winner is . . . Answer: None of the above. That's what Pop Eye found in a survey of 20 alternative-music insiders asked who will be the "breakout" act on the "Lollapalooza '93" tour, which begins Friday in Vancouver. More than half of the voters said they did not see any of the acts making a dramatic move to a new level of popularity because of the exposure on the tour.
SPORTS
April 28, 2001
The XFL just wrapped up its first season. I believe it was a successful venture. I know sportswriters and late-night comedians thought it was a big flop, but I don't see it that way. Maybe the TV ratings slipped because people were expecting something different, but it was nothing more than smash-mouth football. I enjoyed watching players from major college teams play for rent money. These players would try their hardest each game just to get a $2,000 bonus for winning. There were no million-dollar crybabies.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
Competition is often fierce in the dog-eat-dog world of politics, and this time the Democrats won. Alice, a Belgian shepherd owned by Rep. Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) was named "top dog" of Congress, beating canines owned by four Republican competitors in a special Capitol Hill version of a dog food company's Great American Dog contest. Alice's reward was a check for $2,500 and 1,000 pounds of dog food, which will be donated to the humane society. She won a new leash and engraved name tag also.
BOOKS
July 19, 1987 | Merle Rubin
Sometimes, the difference between freshness and cliche is no more than a hair's breadth. What, after all, is fresher--or more predictable--than youth; what experience as unique--or as common--as falling in love? Francoise Sagan, who rocketed to fame in 1954 with her novel, "Bonjour Tristesse," has continued to tread the fine line between triteness and truthfulness.
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