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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989
When is a "green card" no longer a "green card" but still called one? According to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, it's when you're talking about the green card--officially known as the Alien Registration Receipt Card. Ernest Gustafson, the INS district director in Los Angeles, said Wednesday the so-called green card--named for the color introduced in the 1950s--will be rosy pink.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has proposed cutting levels of legal immigration to the United States, the numbers are falling even without official action--especially in California, where 20% fewer immigrants entered the state in 1995 than the year before, a new report shows. An analysis released Thursday by the Immigration and Naturalization Service shows that 720,461 legal immigrants were admitted into the country in fiscal 1995--a 10.4% drop from 1994 and 20.3% below 1993 levels.
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NEWS
December 23, 1988
These are the individuals involved in Thursday's ruling on federal immigration law: Khader Musa Hamide, 34. Federal authorities accused Hamide of being a "dominant leader" of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, but he has denied affiliation with the Marxist faction. A native of the Israeli-occupied West Bank city of Bethlehem, Hamide, who lives in Los Angeles, said he does not even know if the PFLP exists in the United States.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over and over, Roberto Hernandez's mother recalls the day her son left home: He tosses a small canvas bag over his broad shoulders and heads down a dusty Mexican road to catch a bus. Destination: California. Before he left, "I said to him, 'God Bless you, mijo (my son),' " says Socorro Lopez. "He hugged me so tightly." Roberto eschewed a tearful farewell. " 'Mama, stay here at the door. Don't go out into the street. I can't bear to see you cry.'
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
In the latest court decision extending the amnesty program for certain groups of immigrants, a federal judge in Los Angeles has cleared the way for the legalization of tens of thousands of aliens--including large numbers of Asians, Europeans and South Americans--who re-entered the country with legal visas.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has proposed cutting levels of legal immigration to the United States, the numbers are falling even without official action--especially in California, where 20% fewer immigrants entered the state in 1995 than the year before, a new report shows. An analysis released Thursday by the Immigration and Naturalization Service shows that 720,461 legal immigrants were admitted into the country in fiscal 1995--a 10.4% drop from 1994 and 20.3% below 1993 levels.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
In what civil rights lawyers hailed as a historic free speech decision, a federal judge ruled Thursday that alien residents have the same broad free speech rights as citizens and declared unconstitutional key provisions of the McCarthy-Era McCarran-Walter Act, which allow the government to deport aliens for their political views. U.S. District Judge Stephen V.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over and over, Roberto Hernandez's mother recalls the day her son left home: He tosses a small canvas bag over his broad shoulders and heads down a dusty Mexican road to catch a bus. Destination: California. Before he left, "I said to him, 'God Bless you, mijo (my son),' " says Socorro Lopez. "He hugged me so tightly." Roberto eschewed a tearful farewell. " 'Mama, stay here at the door. Don't go out into the street. I can't bear to see you cry.'
SPORTS
August 23, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE
Al Davis caused a commotion at Saratoga last Sunday. This wasn't the Raiders' Al Davis. It was a 4-year-old gelding with the same name, a horse named after the football executive. Al Davis, who earlier in the season had won a race at Saratoga by 10 lengths, was entered Sunday for a $45,000 claiming price. Frank (Pancho) Martin, who trains for Viola Sommer, put in a claim before the race for Al Davis. But the horse broke down during the running and had to be destroyed the next day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989
When is a "green card" no longer a "green card" but still called one? According to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, it's when you're talking about the green card--officially known as the Alien Registration Receipt Card. Ernest Gustafson, the INS district director in Los Angeles, said Wednesday the so-called green card--named for the color introduced in the 1950s--will be rosy pink.
NEWS
December 23, 1988
These are the individuals involved in Thursday's ruling on federal immigration law: Khader Musa Hamide, 34. Federal authorities accused Hamide of being a "dominant leader" of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, but he has denied affiliation with the Marxist faction. A native of the Israeli-occupied West Bank city of Bethlehem, Hamide, who lives in Los Angeles, said he does not even know if the PFLP exists in the United States.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
In what civil rights lawyers hailed as a historic free speech decision, a federal judge ruled Thursday that alien residents have the same broad free speech rights as citizens and declared unconstitutional key provisions of the McCarthy-Era McCarran-Walter Act, which allow the government to deport aliens for their political views. U.S. District Judge Stephen V.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
In the latest court decision extending the amnesty program for certain groups of immigrants, a federal judge in Los Angeles has cleared the way for the legalization of tens of thousands of aliens--including large numbers of Asians, Europeans and South Americans--who re-entered the country with legal visas.
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